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What your Coffee says about you - Page 2

post #31 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

Here's my technique, called "System D" in France. wink.gif



Vive la revolution!! FF that's truly great...

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #32 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post
 

French Press, Chris?  isn't that Le Monde, Le Nouvelle Observateur, L'Humanite', Le Figaro....

Oh yes, that's clever, and I forgot about those too...  lol!!

 

I have to ask, you as an Italian, do you use one of these? When my daughter studied and lived on her own, she had one of these Italian coffee makers. I don't even know how they call these things. Italian home espresso maker? I do remember my daughter insisted on making me a coffee more than once when I visited her. It was like a shot of kryptonite but then straight in a vein.

post #33 of 52

That's a "moka" Chris.  And believe it or not, Chris, pretty much EVERYBODY makes coffee that way here.  There are far fewer home espresso machines than there are Mokas.  

 

Yes, we have three of them, one cup, three cup and 6 cup, though now both my husband (Who is actually Italian) and I rarely use them unless we have italian guests for dinner and one wants an after dinner coffee.  We used to use them for caffe-latte in the morning before it was possible to find any sort of filter or cafetiere or percolater machine here and before anyone sold lightly roasted coffee).  Heat the milk in a pot, pour it into your cup, add some coffee from the Moka. 

 

Inside it is a little funnel like thing that you put the coffee into that sits into the base, where the water goes.  There is a filter in the base of the screw-on top (aluminum with tiny holes) and the water boils up and passes partly in steam up the funnel, through the grinds, and into the top which has a pipe sticking up inside and the coffee comes out into the top part.  There's a valve on the side for safety, but sometimes it blocks and people have had the whole thing explode with coffee all over the ceiling. 

 

I hope the three illustrations go through - i keep editing and it keeps eliminating two of them


 

 

The older type of coffeepot here is called the "Napoletana" which looks like this:

 


 

these are its components"

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTLMZB6rGWj1ZVqI6mkhRExRdVXu7sI9Jh-FsDh3WNg6Bf4V5KEpQ
 

you put water into the part with the handle without the spout, put the coffee in the right hand side of the part lying down, and screw the cover with the tiny holes onto it.  You insert the lying down part into the base without bthe spout, and then put the part with the spout upside down over that.  Put it on the fire. 

It has a tiny hole on the side of the water-holding part which when the water boils it sputters out to tell you that it's boiling.  Then, trying not to burn your hands considering the shortness of the handles and the fact that the top and bottom aren't screwed together (only the coffee grind part is screwed in) and you turn the two over all at once. 

The coffee drips through the grinds into the bottom.  You remove that part and you're left with a little pitcher to pour the coffee out with. 

Drip coffee, the old fashioned way. 

These are almost always beat up aluminum, though they make some fancier ones in stainless. 

 

a little note of interest. 

Do not ever wash a coffeepot in front of an italian.  Moka or Napoletana, they never wash them, only rinse.  They think it makes bad coffee.  I think it's stupid, and always washed mine.  But old superstitions die hard.  Coffee is oily and the rancidity of an accumulation of old coffee can't be good. 

 

Anyway, the coffee of the napoletana is less strong, since it's not steam that's passing through it.  I actually like it. 


Edited by siduri - 10/11/13 at 4:59am
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #34 of 52
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #35 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisBelgium View Post
 

Oh yes, that's clever, and I forgot about those too...  lol!!

 

I have to ask, you as an Italian, do you use one of these? When my daughter studied and lived on her own, she had one of these Italian coffee makers. I don't even know how they call these things. Italian home espresso maker? I do remember my daughter insisted on making me a coffee more than once when I visited her. It was like a shot of kryptonite but then straight in a vein.

 

It's called a Moka Pot made by Bialetti and you can find them at Amazon and ebay.


Edited by kokopuffs - 10/11/13 at 9:46am

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #36 of 52
Here are Siduri's pics:



... two(2) of them anyway.
post #37 of 52

OK, ice man, you have to show me how you did that.  How come i could get only one of the three, and then if i changed the spacing around (sometimes pictures overlap and they cancel each other out) i got another picture instead of the one the first time. 

 

However, weirdly, the first one you put is not the one i had posted, or at least, not the one i thought.  The one i thought is a diagram of the insides of the moka.   I presume you clicked on the link.  sorry everyone, but i will try again to post this, even though it brings us off topic.  I've posted multiple pictures before, why can't i do it now!

 

500px-Moka_steam.svg.png
 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #38 of 52

ok, this time it worked.  One computer expert told me when things go wrong with computers, everyone thinks it's some electronic or logical or scientific explanation that must be behind it.  But in fact, he said, it's simply that inside the computer there are tiny little creatures, little men if you will, who like to play tricks.  I think that's the most elegant scientific explanation, occam's razor and all that.

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #39 of 52

expresso all the way for me I am moving to dominican republic and can't wait to have a nice expresso watching the sunset is so beautiful and relaxing after a long day in the kitchen

post #40 of 52

Despite all of the verbage and B.S., I really like my moka pots by Bialetti.   The best espresso maker I ever owned was hand made by Salvatore and you won't do any better than Salvatore of California.  Like the Harley, it real American-made quality.  You won't do any better than Salvatore.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #41 of 52

yes, yes, yes -- regular coffee (no funky dunky flavours) with a bit of cream on the side in a thick mug.  now that's what I call a good thing :-)

post #42 of 52

what do u americans call a regular "flat white" ? a shot of coffee in a cup topped up with warm milk and a small cremer froth.. not a cappacino tho

post #43 of 52

FrenchFries -

 

That's a hilarious post!

 

I know what "systeme D" means   :roll:

 

and your lashup certainly exemplifies it.

 

Mike

travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #44 of 52

I used to French Press my coffee. Then one summer I decided to go with iced coffee, which I cold brewed.

 When the weather got cold I tried the french press again and couldn't tolerate the off flavors. The screen needed replacing again and there always seems some grounds make it into the cup that foul the flavor as they steep. 

 I tried the Aeropress http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AeroPress  and it works great. Since I saw no mention of here I thought it might be worth mentioning. 

 I've also heard good reviews for the Clever Dripper. http://www.sweetmarias.com/clevercoffeedripperpictorial.php

Both of these have the advantage giving the coffee some time to steep before going in the cup. And both use filters that prevent grounds from getting in the cup.

 

 

post #45 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisBelgium View Post
 

Speaking of drip-coffee, the following picture was taken some 10 years ago. I didn't have a digital camera then, so this picture is scanned from my pictures.

It is taken in the home of a Dominican family, in the neighborhood of Sosua. That's how this lady made us great cup of coffee! The whole ambiance made it an unforgettable experience.

I do remember my grand-mother and my own mother making coffee exactly the same way; pouring boiling hot water -bit by bit- on coffee in a handmade small bag that was attached to a metal ring which hung in the coffee-pot. The bag was then rinsed and used over and over again!

The weird thing is that this method is back in many professional coffee-shops over here, many times called... slow coffee!


This is the method of making coffee I grew up with, the coffee sock. We used to use a wire hanger to twist the liquid out of the sock. We had an outdoor kitchen like that once too when we were really poor in the mountains of Vega Baja, PR. Same color, corrugated steel and everything.

 

 

I like my coffee medium strong, with soy and no sugar.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #46 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pollopicu View Post
 

I like my coffee medium strong, with soy and no sugar.

LOL, I am kinda slow, it took me a while to figure out that you meant soy milk. I kept saying soy?, soy?, soy? because I was thinking soy sauce. Too funny!

 

I use a coffee sock on a daily basis. As a matter of fact, I just ordered a 6 pack of coffee socks on line. It is my favorite coffee brewing method by far. Boil water. Pour over freshly ground coffee. Steep 3-4 minutes. Strain through sock.

 

Best part is that I just went on vacation for a month and my coffee maker was easy to pack along.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #47 of 52

I think I'll get a sock for cold brewing. Seems like it would work well.

 

For my morning cup of hot joe the Aeropress works best for me.

post #48 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

LOL, I am kinda slow, it took me a while to figure out that you meant soy milk. I kept saying soy?, soy?, soy? because I was thinking soy sauce. Too funny!

 

I use a coffee sock on a daily basis. As a matter of fact, I just ordered a 6 pack of coffee socks on line. It is my favorite coffee brewing method by far. Boil water. Pour over freshly ground coffee. Steep 3-4 minutes. Strain through sock.

 

Best part is that I just went on vacation for a month and my coffee maker was easy to pack along.


Interesting combination, coffee and soy sauce. lol

 

talking about weird things in coffee...in Puerto Rico we used to put a chunk of cheese in our coffee, or crumble tons of Export crackers into it until it became a mush and you had to eat your "coffee" with a spoon.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #49 of 52

Speaking (typing) of weird things, coffee with butter seems to be all the rage.  

post #50 of 52

Lol coffee says nothing about us except we can't deal with the day without our caffine fix, i honestly need at least 1 cup a day to feel awake, i don't drink it when i get up though i usually have one before tea if it's late or we order a takeaway or later on, i love cappuccinos or a cup of coffee as long as they are made adequate enough, the most branded coffee places make terrible coffee though as same for airports and train stations, usually the best coffee is from the less popular cafés  or takeaways they add the right amount of instant coffee, sugar and milk but the branded places make it so strong i can't stand to drink it. I love white coffee with a tea spoon and a half of sugar but i rarely have coffee out i make instant coffee here in my house.

post #51 of 52

Looking through a Puerto Rican pinterest board, I came upon this pic of the coffee sock.

http://media-cache-cd0.pinimg.com/originals/6b/9e/18/6b9e18ee419d92ab25d097ad6571747f.jpg

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #52 of 52

 

New coffee maker as a Christmas gift, Mister K~girl begged me for it!

He likes to get all sorts of different K-Cups and try a different flavor of 'cuppa joe' through the day

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