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Oil Stones and 501 BlueJeans

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

All said and done, if you gotta' old stained carbon steel knife.  Once honed on a fine india  and followed by drawing thru cardboard, wipe with an alcohol soaked rag.  Dry.  And then reverse-strop on the thighs of your 501s.  That'll true it.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #2 of 12
Sure, but in most cases you will have to perform a serious thinning before.
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

Henckels yes, old Sabatiers, NO!

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #4 of 12
Do you have unused old carbons in mind, perhaps?
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benuser View Post

Do you have unused old carbons in mind, perhaps?

 

All of my old carbons are used!   :look:

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #6 of 12
And none of the Sabatiers has ever been thinned??
Edited by Benuser - 10/8/13 at 7:13am
post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 

To my knowledge, no as I've been the only one who has sharpened them.  However they've been re-beveled a time or two in the past.  It's my thicker Forschners that require thinning or re-beveling bigtime.


Edited by kokopuffs - 10/8/13 at 8:10am

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

Here's a couple of links to good Sabatier Carbon steel knives:

 

  1. Theirs-Issard at The Best Things
     
  2. K Sabatier Outlet Store

 

I don't know which is which but if I needed another carbon steel blade, I'd order one each from both distributors and then make the comparison.


Edited by kokopuffs - 10/8/13 at 5:44pm

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #9 of 12
With their risen prices I don't know if I may advice a Nogent, excepted for one who's interested in cutlery history and wants to have the same kind of knife Escoffier used. But the rat tail has it disadvantages as well, and the steel is still very soft. Technically a Fujiwara FKH or a Masahiro are much better knives, and, with a little money added, the Misono Swedish and Hiromoto AS.
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benuser View Post

...But the rat tail has it disadvantages as well, and the steel is still very soft....

 

The scandinavians have been using knives with rat-tail tangs for over a millenia.  It seems to work for them.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #11 of 12
Nothing wrong with the rat tail. An elegant light weight construction, allowing an easy straightening and eventual replacement of the handle. But the ebony is very thin near the ferrule and tends to crack. Not exactly a problem in days when good ebony was plenty available and affordable. Having it rehandled today won't be that simple anymore.
post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

I own two Sabatier four star elephant pariing knives purchased in the late 70's with a similar ferrule, encased in a metal band.  Made with a plastique handle, they've held up quite well.  Dunno' if they're Nogents or what.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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