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Picnic Sandwich Question

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I'm grasping at straws here.

I once saw a cooking show (might not have been on the cooking network) where they made picnic sandwiches.

They involved french bread, and you made the sandwich and let it sit overnight for the flavors to really intensify.

I can't remember the ingredients but was interested in makign something similar for this weekend.

I believe the one I saw had meat, I'd need one without it.

Do you know what these are called, or any recipes for them?

~~Shimmer~~
"There are few hours in life more agreeable than the hour dedicated to the ceremony known as afternoon tea"
- Henry James
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"There are few hours in life more agreeable than the hour dedicated to the ceremony known as afternoon tea"
- Henry James
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post #2 of 21
Sounds kind of like a Muffaletta. Here are a couple of recipe links in case this is what you're looking for.
http://www.recipesource.com/main-dis...1/rec0124.html

http://www.chefrick.com/html/muffalettasandwich.html
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post #3 of 21
Not sure if this has ever been on a show, but while on a trip to Paris we were amazed at the people walking around everywhere eating jambon sandwiches at all hours. By the time we got to our third one we started taking them apart to 'cipher the appeal.

Basically top-notch crusty small diameter french loafs, slathered in butter (butter alone made the trip worthwhile.....) with a light assortment of cured hams and cheese. Some had light hit of dijon. Simple, light and delicious.

The cool thing about this for picnics, which I had never considered until seeing your post, is the butter avoids any issues of spoilage associated with mayo, etc. Assuming you don't take them on a 5 day camping trip.........:eek:

As an aside - they also had an "American" sandwich, which was piled high with all sorts of stuff. Pretty funny, and emphasized the difference in our eating styles!
post #4 of 21
This type of sandwich is also know as a Pain Bagat. You most likely saw Julia and Jaques cooking show.

It is pretty much a bagat with sliced meats and greens with a red wine vinaigrette. It is made ahead of time and weighted down. I would use grilled vegetables if you want to avoid meat.
Thanks,

Nicko 
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Thanks,

Nicko 
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post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 
So without the meat, help me think of combos.

First you scoop out some of the bread.

Drizzle with red wine vinaigrette?

Then what?

Doesn't the drizzle make it soggy?

Can I include some kind of cheese?

~~Shimmer~~
"There are few hours in life more agreeable than the hour dedicated to the ceremony known as afternoon tea"
- Henry James
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"There are few hours in life more agreeable than the hour dedicated to the ceremony known as afternoon tea"
- Henry James
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post #6 of 21
Thread Starter 

This one sounds good.. do you think it'll work?

Sort of a Hero Sandwich

Serves 8
To transport this sandwich, place it on a round board or flat plate, and wrap tightly in plastic. Unwrap and slice just before serving.

1 large round loaf bread
6 large portobello mushrooms, stems trimmed to 1/2 inch
Olive oil, for brushing
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 large fennel bulb, thinly sliced
7 medium tomatoes, cored and sliced
1 small red onion(4 ounces), peeled, thinly sliced, and rings separated
2 large yellow peppers, roasted, peeled, and cut lengthwise into thick slices
6 cups fresh basil leaves, washed
Creamy Tomato Dressing

1. Cut bread in half horizontally. Using a short serrated knife, carve out insides of bread, in whole pieces if possible. Using a long serrated knife, thinly slice inside pieces. Cover; set aside. Pull out any remaining bread from crusts, leaving 1/4-inch bread border. Cover crusts; set aside.

2. Thinly slice mushrooms. Heat a grill to medium hot, or place a grill pan over high heat. Brush mushrooms with olive oil; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Grill until tender, 2 to 3 minutes per side.

3. Brush fennel with oil; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Grill until tender, 3 to 4 minutes per side.

4. Arrange filling in bottom of bread: First, cover with half the tomatoes, then half the onions. Sprinkle with salt and pepper; drizzle with 3 tablespoons dressing. Cover with 1 cup basil, and top with a layer of sliced bread. The second layer is made up of half the mushrooms, then salt and pepper, dressing, basil, and bread. The third layer is peppers, salt and pepper, dressing, basil, and bread. The fourth layer is the remaining mushrooms, salt and pepper, dressing, basil, and bread. The fifth layer is fennel, salt and pepper, dressing, basil, and bread. The last layer is the remaining tomatoes, onions, salt and pepper, dressing, and basil.

5. Place top of bread on bottom half, enclosing vegetables. Wrap with plastic; weight with heavy books. Let stand 45 minutes.

6. Unwrap sandwich. Using a large serrated knife, cut into eight wedges.

(from Martha Stewart.com)
"There are few hours in life more agreeable than the hour dedicated to the ceremony known as afternoon tea"
- Henry James
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"There are few hours in life more agreeable than the hour dedicated to the ceremony known as afternoon tea"
- Henry James
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post #7 of 21
Sounds perfect!
Thanks,

Nicko 
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All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
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Thanks,

Nicko 
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All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
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post #8 of 21
Hi Shimmer,

For this time of the year... I would recommend that one side of the bread you use a basil pesto and the otherside a tappanade
For the ingredients I would grill eggplant, zuchinni,red and yellow peppers and some kind of mushroom,if you remove the gills from the bortobello and grill them,they would work nicely.Possibly a few drops of a good balsamic on the grilled veg will give a nice balance with the tapanade and pesto. A good goat cheese or possibly something a little stronger to help hold the sandwich togethetAnd don't forget the salt(sea salt) and cracked black pepper.

And I would use a long loaf and cut into individual sandwiches laterI normally get about 8.

Hope this helps
Keeping it simple,is the best recipe.
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Keeping it simple,is the best recipe.
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post #9 of 21
Hi Shimmer,

I remember the same sort of thing, but thought it was one of the Martha Stewart programs. After looking on her site I found the following recipe which is supposed to stand for 45 minutes:

Sort of a Hero Sandwich

Serves 8
To transport this sandwich, place it on a round board or flat plate, and wrap tightly in plastic. Unwrap and slice just before serving.

1 large round loaf bread
6 large portobello mushrooms, stems trimmed to 1/2 inch
Olive oil, for brushing
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 large fennel bulb, thinly sliced
7 medium tomatoes, cored and sliced
1 small red onion(4 ounces), peeled, thinly sliced, and rings separated
2 large yellow peppers, roasted, peeled, and cut lengthwise into thick slices
6 cups fresh basil leaves, washed
Creamy Tomato Dressing

1. Cut bread in half horizontally. Using a short serrated knife, carve out insides of bread, in whole pieces if possible. Using a long serrated knife, thinly slice inside pieces. Cover; set aside. Pull out any remaining bread from crusts, leaving 1/4-inch bread border. Cover crusts; set aside.

2. Thinly slice mushrooms. Heat a grill to medium hot, or place a grill pan over high heat. Brush mushrooms with olive oil; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Grill until tender, 2 to 3 minutes per side.

3. Brush fennel with oil; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Grill until tender, 3 to 4 minutes per side.

4. Arrange filling in bottom of bread: First, cover with half the tomatoes, then half the onions. Sprinkle with salt and pepper; drizzle with 3 tablespoons dressing. Cover with 1 cup basil, and top with a layer of sliced bread. The second layer is made up of half the mushrooms, then salt and pepper, dressing, basil, and bread. The third layer is peppers, salt and pepper, dressing, basil, and bread. The fourth layer is the remaining mushrooms, salt and pepper, dressing, basil, and bread. The fifth layer is fennel, salt and pepper, dressing, basil, and bread. The last layer is the remaining tomatoes, onions, salt and pepper, dressing, and basil.

5. Place top of bread on bottom half, enclosing vegetables. Wrap with plastic; weight with heavy books. Let stand 45 minutes.

6. Unwrap sandwich. Using a large serrated knife, cut into eight wedges.

----

But there isn't any meat in it. Then there's her version of a Pan Bagnat:

Pan Bagnat

Makes 4
In the south of France, bakers make rolls specifically for this street-food favorite. Any large, crusty roll with a soft interior is suitable.

1/4 pound young string beans or haricots verts
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
1/2 bulb fennel, thinly sliced
1 pint cherry tomatoes, quartered
1/2 red bell pepper, seeded and cut into strips
1/2 cup black oil-cured or Niçoise olives, pitted and halved
2 tablespoons capers
2 six-and-one-half ounce cans tuna, drained
1 bunch watercress, stems trimmed
Watercress Vinaigrette
Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
4 large, crusty rolls
2 hard-boiled eggs, sliced

1. In a bowl, combine beans, onion, fennel, tomatoes, pepper, olives, capers, tuna, and watercress with 3/4 cup of the vinaigrette. Season with salt and pepper.

2. Slice open rolls, and scoop out some of the top halves. Brush remaining vinaigrette on insides of rolls. Pile salad mixture on bottom pieces, and top with egg slices. Cover with tops of rolls; serve.

----

You could probably do step 1 the night before and let everything stand in the vinaigrette and assemble the sandwiches quickly just before serving.
She doesn't specify, but the ones I've had use tuna packed in olive oil (the water-packed stuff wouldn't taste nearly as good).
Emily

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Emily

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post #10 of 21
Nicko was close: it's Pan Bagnat -- foods layered on a big round loaf that gets wrapped and pressed. It's late now, but in the morning I'll look it up and post more. :p
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post #11 of 21
Shimmer I've made veg. sandwiches for mushroom forays....
about 100....

I used sheets of herb fougasse cut in half lengthwise
Kalamata tapenade
coursely chopped canned artichokes
grilled squash
grilled red onions
grilled portabellos
grilled/peeled red peppers
feta (I use french sheeps milk)
Then I take coursely chopped tomatoes and mix with basalmic, basil, salt and pepper
They were great 24 hours later.....in the woods after hiking....

I've made wraps with
large tortillas
hummos
thinnly sliced cabbage,red peppers
baked portabellos mixed with a dijon mustard sauce
crumbles of feta)


You can take cans of tuna and add them to your nicoise.

Brian Menzel made a great potato sandwich at the market....

fougasse
Chevre mixed with dried tomatoes, garlic and rosemary
boiled sliced and sauteed potatoes
greens mixed with basalmic viniagrette
It was wonderful!!!


Watch any protein going out without refrigeration.....eggs, tuna, mayo, etc....
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post #12 of 21
How about a sandwich either in pita pocket bread, with hummus, feta, lettuce, olive tapanade, and a chopped tomato/onion/cucumber 'relish' with oil/vinegar, oregano, s/p. Sometimes I do this in a wrap, too.

Or a black bean/corn salad with monteray jack and pickled jalapenos in a seasoned wrap.
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post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 
These are all great ideas, thanks so much.

Now lets say I found some Alaskan smoked salmon I forgot we had been given, and wanted to somehow incorporate that. What would you suggest then?

~~Shimmer~~
"There are few hours in life more agreeable than the hour dedicated to the ceremony known as afternoon tea"
- Henry James
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"There are few hours in life more agreeable than the hour dedicated to the ceremony known as afternoon tea"
- Henry James
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post #14 of 21
First of all, Shimmer, I want to come on that picnic! Or any picnic with the rest of you. These sandwhiches look incredible. :lips:
Second, sorry I repeated the Martha Stewart hero you'd already included. I could have sworn it wasn't there when I wrote my reply--those brain cells die faster every day.

As for the smoked salmon, most of the recipes here look like they'd work really well with it. Maybe replace the tuna in the pan bagnat with the salmon.
Emily

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Emily

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post #15 of 21
smoked salmon....cucumbers,asparagus, maybe some pickled Japanese radish, (dillweed garlic mayo held cold separately)
I had sushi handrolls for dinner can you tell?

Now that your adding protein watch the temp closely.
cooking with all your senses.....
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post #16 of 21
No doubt!! Especially with the dress suggested.

I have a B.I.L. who's an attorney if anyone needs help for the deceased.......... kidding:p
post #17 of 21
Here is one of my favorite sandwiches to make for a picnic. It is kind of a cross between a Pan Bagnat and a Muffeletta.

-1 large round rusty loaf of bread (the crustier the better)
-1 1/2# variety of Italian meats, sliced thinly, or smoked turkey breast
-8 slices provolone or Mozz
-1 vine ripe tomato, sliced thinly
-8 slices of very thinly sliced onion (as thin as you can possibly slice by hand)
-balsamic vinegar
-that hot italian pickled veg. (Gardinara ?)
-a mix of olives

Pit and roughly chop the olives. Split open the bread. Starting with the bottom add, in order: a good drizzle of balsamic vinegar, a sprinkling of olives, the cheese, the tomato, the meat, the onion, more olives and the pickled veg. Drizzle the top part of the loaf with more balsamic vinegar, and some of the oil from the pickled veg. Place on top, and mash it down. Wrap very tightly in plastic, trying to keep the whole thing mashed down. Place in the fridge with a nice heavy weight on top (I often use a brick), and allow to sit over night. The bread softens up quite a bit, and the inside gets kind of soggy, but not too much. I cut this into 8 wedges to feed 4 people.
post #18 of 21
Here in Genova we are pretty familiar with the Pan Bagnat you can have in Cote D'Azur, which is, basically, a Salade Nicoise packed into a sandwich (so, if you like them, you can add to the ingredients of Phoebe's recipe some salted anchovies!). I have never heard about a Pan bagnat calling for other ingredients, if different types exist could you tell me more about them?

BTW: Pete, the correct name of those Italian pickled mixed vegetables you mentioned (which can be hot or not) is "GIARDINIERA" :)

Pongi
post #19 of 21
Pongi, I think that putting other ingredients into a pan bagnet is an 'American' thing; you know, take one thing and see how many spins you can put on it!!!
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post #20 of 21
Pongi,

Does this sound like the one you saw? (Just leave out the meat.)

PRESSED PICNIC SANDWICH
Serves 10

This sandwich can be made one day ahead of time; instead of adding the vinaigrette in step three, add it just before you pack the sandwich, or one hour before serving.

3 medium red bell peppers
1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 loaf rustic Italian bread, such as ciabatta
1/2 cup prepared black-olive paste
8 ounces fresh goat cheese
8 ounces marinated artichoke hearts
6 ounces prosciutto, thinly sliced
1/4 pound peppered salami, thinly sliced
2 1/4 cups loosely packed mixed fresh herbs, such as basil, cilantro, or parsley

1.Heat a grill or grill pan to hot; or heat broiler. Cook peppers until completely charred, turning frequently so all sides cook evenly, 8 to 10 minutes. Remove from heat. Place peppers in a deep bowl, and cover bowl with plastic wrap. Set bowl aside until the skins loosen and the peppers are cool enough to handle. Using your hands, rub off the charred skin, rinsing your hands frequently under cold running water. Slice peppers in half, and remove the seeds and stems. Cut flesh into 1-inch-wide strips.
Ê
2.In a medium bowl, combine the mustard and vinegar. Gradually whisk in the olive oil. Whisk in 2 tablespoons warm water. Whisk in salt and pepper to taste, and set the vinaigrette aside.
Ê
3.Slice loaf of bread lengthwise, and remove soft crumb; reserve crumb for another use. Spread olive paste on the bottom crust, and add the pepper strips. Crumble the goat cheese on top of peppers. Arrange artichoke hearts over goat cheese. Drizzle half of the reserved vinaigrette on top. Arrange prosciutto and salami over artichoke hearts. Drizzle with the remaining vinaigrette. Scatter herbs over meats. Place the top crust on sandwich.
Ê
4.Wrap the sandwich tightly with plastic wrap. Set a weight, such as a brick or large cast-iron skillet on top for at least 1 hour. When ready to serve, slice sandwich into 10 pieces.
post #21 of 21
Thanks for the spelling Pongi. I was too lazy, last night, to walk my butt down to the fridge and check the correct spelling. My spelling, in English, sucks pretty badly, let alone a foreign language!!!!:D :D :D
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