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Stove on an island

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

We're looking at moving to a bigger house (bunch of kids). 90% of the houses I see built after 1990 have the stove or cooktop placed in the kitchen island. This island usually faces some other living space and has bar seating across from the kitchen side. So you have a stove out on the middle of the room and ether have downdraft ventilation or a vent hood in the middle of the kitchen interfering with your eye line as you look across the kitchen. I'm seeing this in new houses as well. 


I can't see a reason that a building or kitchen designer would ever put a stove or cooktop in this location. Besides making it hard to find a house I want to buy or committing to a kitchen remodel, I can't figure out why this is done. 

 

This is so prevalent, there must be a reason for it. Is there some advantage I'm not seeing? Would be happy to be educated on this and have my opinion overturned. 

post #2 of 9

I think it has to do with "being modern" -  a fad? - just to be different?  the in thing?

 

done "right" it can of course contribute in a positive way to the "kitchen flow" - not done right, well, not done right can put it anywhere and make a disaster,

 

the overhead vent hoods can be "raised" for eye line clearance. 

 

be aware, the side draft / down draft arrangements are nominally effective to "a total waste"

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

I hear you. I had a downdraft vent once. Not very useful and it sucks too much heat away from the flames.

 

I don't see how this configuration could be useful. Why would I want to cook on a stove with people sitting right in front of me? Am I running my own cooking show? A home version of Benihana? 

post #4 of 9

>>I don't see how this configuration could be useful. Why would I want to cook on a stove with people sitting right in front of me? Am I running my own cooking show?

 

HEE-HEE!  is that the purpose of "the island design?"  perhaps - goes with the Martha Steward School of Home Entertaining....  it's the whole "open space" concept - so you can engage in witty conversation while whirr-thinning the crepes....

 

the problem I'd have with it is the grease spatter/film that seems to eventually coat everything . . .  it's enough 'maintenance' with a cooktop in a 'confined width' - open to the point where it can float into the basement, makes my haid hurt...

post #5 of 9

I think that it makes for more main counter and upper cabinet space. Also allows one to have a double oven.

post #6 of 9

I can see it especially with breakfast. Pancakes fresh from the pan to the plate, or omelettes.  It lets you be more involved in the family space instead of staring at a backsplash while cooking. Similarly, it's a good way to keep an eye on the kids while they do homework and you're prepping dinner or some such. 

 

From a design perspective, it can provide a sort of dramatic structure depending on the hood systems, and certainly not just the down draft. It was something I talked about with my kitchen remodeler when i redid my kitchen and he quickly killed the idea because of my home layout. He was right. 

 

The free standing glass hoods can be quite sculptural. 

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=glass+stove+hoods&safe=off&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=ZZReUvDeAoWWyAGxwoCADw&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1305&bih=948

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by carpenter View Post
 

I think that it makes for more main counter and upper cabinet space. Also allows one to have a double oven.

Why would a double oven be easier if the cooktop is in an island rather than on a wall? 

 

Good point on the counters. My preference is for more island space. 

post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post
 

I can see it especially with breakfast. Pancakes fresh from the pan to the plate, or omelettes.  It lets you be more involved in the family space instead of staring at a backsplash while cooking. Similarly, it's a good way to keep an eye on the kids while they do homework and you're prepping dinner or some such. 

 

From a design perspective, it can provide a sort of dramatic structure depending on the hood systems, and certainly not just the down draft. It was something I talked about with my kitchen remodeler when i redid my kitchen and he quickly killed the idea because of my home layout. He was right. 

 

The free standing glass hoods can be quite sculptural. 

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=glass+stove+hoods&safe=off&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=ZZReUvDeAoWWyAGxwoCADw&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1305&bih=948

 

That's a point I had not considered (watching the kids while cooking). This suddenly makes sense. I don't like it, but can now see why others would. (I dislike not getting why something would be done in a way that makes no sense to me). Thanks for the explanation. 

 

My style is different - I prefer to be able to engage people while doing prep work and to use my kitchen island as a place for people to chat and congregate while I'm cooking. I get that it means my back is to them while I'm at the stove. 

 

My experience is that people migrate toward the kitchen when I'm entertaining. Having an island for them to sit down and have some appetizers while I'm cooking is my preference. 

post #9 of 9

I can tell you that with my family, every get together turns into a kitchen gathering.  All conversations are held there and everyone congregates there.  I think this may be the case with a lot of people so designers decided to have the whole living area as an extension of the kitchen.  That being said, the design messes up the flow and the functionality (for me anyway).

I have an older house without that particular frill. Of course that meant remodeling the rest of the house.:(  That was okay though, I have a very large functional kitchen that we can all stand around and chat in while cooking.

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