or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › A Week of Groceries In Different Countries [Pictures]
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

A Week of Groceries In Different Countries [Pictures]

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

Thought it was interesting 

 

http://realitypod.com/2013/05/a-week-of-groceries-in-different-countries-pictures/

 

Really says something about culture and society today...

post #2 of 28

The poorer the country, the healthier the food. 

post #3 of 28

I was always shocked, going back to the states, to find that 70% of people's refrigerator space was dedicated to soft drinks, usually with saccharine and other crap in them, and that they gave this stuff to kids. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #4 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post
 

I was always shocked, going back to the states, to find that 70% of people's refrigerator space was dedicated to soft drinks, usually with saccharine and other crap in them, and that they gave this stuff to kids. 

You don't know how many time I've heard "But it's diet coke, so it's healthy!". :rolleyes:

post #5 of 28
It is amazing to see the difference in  regards to fresh produce.
So much processed food.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #6 of 28

Mexico = lots of fruit but i was surpised by 10 liters of coke

Autralia = Lots of meat

USA = they bought even freaking boxed pizza XD they had packages food up to the ceiling. 

 

 

But i wont lie the most appealing groceries to me were the Japanese and the Guatamela...

 

As said the poorer the countries the more natural the food seems to be. 

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

Reply

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

Reply
post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

The poorer the country, the healthier the food. 


Yes yes yes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  The best natural food I ever ate was from either Senegal or Algeria!  Or even France.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #8 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

You don't know how many time I've heard "But it's diet coke, so it's healthy!". :rolleyes:


that opens a whole other topic, "healthy" food.  When people say "i want some recipes for healthy xxx" or " i want to make my yyys healthier" - you never know what they mean.  Often they mean no sugar but plenty of chemicals, or no real food, but plenty of highly processed "light" products ("light" cheddar).  And then there is also the question of who is it healthier for.  If i have diabetes, high blood pressure, low blood pressure, peanut allergies, overweight or underweight, or am deficient in some substance, or whatever, will make a difference what is healthier for me  . 

 

I wonder how many people realize how highly oversweetened "diet" drinks are.   They don't just hurt you by filling you with bad stuff, but they raise your sweetness tolerance level (besides educating a palate not to distinguish sweet from chemical taste - the taste is horrible, the aftertaste is worse!). 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #9 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post
 

I was always shocked, going back to the states, to find that 70% of people's refrigerator space was dedicated to soft drinks, usually with saccharine and other crap in them, and that they gave this stuff to kids. 

 

 The Huge Chill. Why Are American Refrigerators So Big?

post #10 of 28

Our fridges are so huge to accomodate high volumes of food - since in most american areas don't have local, neighborhood by neighborhood, independent vendors of meats and produce.  It's all been corporatized into supermarkets.  Big boxes rule in this country.  F*** corporated amerika and its big boxes.  Sorry for the foul language.  ....No....I'm not sorry.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #11 of 28

Well, most people in north america live far from stores.  I could get everything i need here in Rome without ever stepping on a bus, never mind a car, and in the early times i was here, i shopped every day at local stores and street markets, as there are in every neighborhood.  I wasn't working outside the home then, or only a couple of hours a week. 

Italy is primarily urban, even in small centers, while americans always spread out widely, and there are NO local stores.  So i can understand the large fridges - what is so strange is that they seem to contain mostly junk.  Mine are packed with vegetables (i have two smaller fridges, since i shop once a week here, but much of it is vegetables).  The rest of my shopping is paper products, detergents, milk, and then meat (we eat it maybe 4 or 5 times a week) and pasta, rice, flour, eggs, oil, and other staples.

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #12 of 28

@siduri:  same here, packed with veggies, condiments, herbs and spices, Budweiser, vino, dairy(liquids) and cheeses. Here in amerika the very few sodas that I purchase are made in Mexico, made with cane sugar instead of the high fructose stuff.  You'll never see more that three or four twelve-ounce bottles of soda in my fridge at a time.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #13 of 28

I always thought Turkish people ate dolmas, almonds,  tahini sauces and chickpeas all day. I never thought they ate so much bread.

post #14 of 28

I do not live far from stores.  I'm used to just getting fresh stuff for the next day or two, but have canned beans, tomato sauce and such stashed away for when needed.

 

I recently posted this on Facebook:

 

 

A lovely early autumn day here in the Salt Lake valley. Just walked up to the store to get some chicken parts to grill for dinner. That's one aspect I really like about living here in this house. There are 2 major chain groceries within walking distance. Two Asian specialty markets, one of which has roast duck and char sui ready to go on weekends. I took a picture of the whole ducks hanging in the warmer, need to take another suitable for posting.

There is also LIberty Park, Salt Lake's biggest, just a couple blocks down the street ( I do live on Park Street ) the Wasatch Community Garden's Grateful tomato garden is right around the corner. There are also 2 nice coffee shops, an Ace Hardware, Trader Joe's, Desert Edge Pub Brewery and some decent restaurants all within strolling radius.

What I don't like is that this increased level of physical activity was intended to reduce the lower back and hip pain I get when walking, not make it worse. Sigh.

 

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SonecaC View Post
 

I always thought Turkish people ate dolmas, almonds,  tahini sauces and chickpeas all day. I never thought they ate so much bread.

 

What we call pizza is actually a variation on Turkish (and other middle eastern countries) flatbread onto which is placed veggies.  It ain't some Italian invention.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #16 of 28

The Southeast Asia Market is probably my favorite asian store in the valley. Ocean Mart on 90th has more variety if I need something less mainstream but the drive adds some cost.  The Japanese one by you is expensive.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #17 of 28

Periodically I make a trip to the bigger city about an hour's drive away.  There, after having lunch at the [Asian] Indian restaurant for some tandoori chicken and other stuff, I drop by the Pakistani and Korean markets for foodstuffs.  What a visual and olefactory feast!!!!!!!    :lips: 

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SonecaC View Post
 

I always thought Turkish people ate dolmas, almonds,  tahini sauces and chickpeas all day. I never thought they ate so much bread.

 

You can bet that every country's cuisine is mainly based on some grain staple in the form of bread, porridge, boiled grain, soup, whatever or other starchy ingredient lke potatoes.  The idea of a meal without bread (or rice, or polenta, or potatoes etc) is inconceivable in most countries, most cultures.  The idea of a meal of just a salad, or just meat and vegetables, without bread (or rice or...) is weird.  The idea of a meal based on almost exclusively the staple grain or root is not weird.  My parents used to tell the story of the poor people who would have a salt cod hanging over the kitchen table where they ate their polenta, and to get some taste on it would slap a slab of polenta onto the cod and then eat it.   Laborers in Italy, construction workers, marble cutters, etc,  would bring their lunch, a gigantic half pagnotta (big bread loaf) and onions. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post
 

 

What we call pizza is actually a variation on Turkish (and other middle eastern countries) flatbread onto which is placed veggies.  It ain't some Italian invention.

Well, to think of pizza as an invention of any one country doesn't make sense.  What does it take to mix flour and water that's been left out and fermented and bake it on a hot stone?  It's like saying soup was invented in some place or other, or pasta, or roasted meat.  It probably arose all over the world and probably long before the iron age.  Not an italian invention, not a turkish invention, but probably the stone age ancestors of all of us invented it. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post
 

Periodically I make a trip to the bigger city about an hour's drive away.  There, after having lunch at the [Asian] Indian restaurant for some tandoori chicken and other stuff, I drop by the Pakistani and Korean markets for foodstuffs.  What a visual and olefactory feast!!!!!!!    :lips: 

we're really lucky in Rome to have had a flood of immigration from all of the poorer countries in the last 20 years, and the international area is in walking distance of my house.  The large  traditional outdoor market that used to be mainly Italian (it was the poorest neighborhood in central rome) has gradually been taken over by immigrants, and you can see a delight of rich spice colors in open containers - Indians next to Pakistanis, North African Halal meat next to Polish pork butchers! 

Make food, not war.  :) 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #19 of 28

As my profile says, I am from Bavaria. Right now, I am living in a small town, just a couple of thousand inhabitants. On a rough count, I have 5 butchers, 3 greengrocers, 2 cheese shops, a fishmonger, and I don't want to start counting the bakeries withing 15 minutes cycling or light rail distance. That and a weekly farmer's market. Fresh and local stuff.

 

This absolutely stunned me when I moved to the US a couple of years ago for a 6 month research project. Butchers? Bakeries? Ehm... not really. Just a couple of supermarkets with a rather marginal produce section. Meat packed in styrofoam and foil?? I did experience a bit of a culture shock back then. 

 

Supermarkets are encroaching on the small businesses here, too, I fear. But so far, they hold out, in particular by providing superior quality.

post #20 of 28

What amazes me most is how many beverages people buy aside from water.  We don't drink any juice at all (it's all sugar minus the fiber), milk for our coffee and the baby and that's it. Hubby keeps a small stash of beer (which I wish he'd get rid of!!!) but that's it.  I like fizzy water so I have one of those soda streams where I can fizz up my water every day, but I don't put any flavorings in it.

 

Diet pepsi is a one-in-a-while treat that I'll only have outside of the house if I'm eating something junky like burgers but it never comes into my home!  Does anyone else have beverages in their home?

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by siduri View Post
 

Well, most people in north america live far from stores.  I could get everything i need here in Rome without ever stepping on a bus, never mind a car, and in the early times i was here, i shopped every day at local stores and street markets, as there are in every neighborhood.  I wasn't working outside the home then, or only a couple of hours a week. 

Italy is primarily urban, even in small centers, while americans always spread out widely, and there are NO local stores.  So i can understand the large fridges - what is so strange is that they seem to contain mostly junk.  Mine are packed with vegetables (i have two smaller fridges, since i shop once a week here, but much of it is vegetables).  The rest of my shopping is paper products, detergents, milk, and then meat (we eat it maybe 4 or 5 times a week) and pasta, rice, flour, eggs, oil, and other staples.

 

That's what's great about living in NYC, you never technically have to go further than walking distance to buy groceries.  As a matter of fact it's kind of a rule in our house not to stock our fridge.  Instead I walk to the market every single day to buy that day's food.  It's a little more costly to live like this, because most of the food is fresh but it's worth it.  Within 2 blocks of me I have supermarkets, fish monger, butcher, organic shops, coffee specialty stores, mediterranean specialty stores, juice bar, pharmacy, bank, restaurants, etc.  I technically never have to leave but every month I do go to Costco to stock up on paper goods and on Saturdays I drive to a nearby farmer's market.  

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #21 of 28

I, too, have a soda stream, Koukou.  I love bubbly water, and the city water of rome is great - tastes better than the bottled-in-plastic stuff, so we now make our own. 

I have an occasional coke outside too (not diet, though, it makes me sick) when it's in a party or reception or something.  I used to drink a lot of it till one day i realized it was SOO sweet it disgusted me.  I would actually love for cocacola to make an adult coke, not with saccharine but with simply half the amount of sugar.  I do like the taste.  Watering it down is not the same, because also the taste is watered down. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #22 of 28

I don't know how much cultural meaning to give to those pictures.

 

Most of the groceries are for a month, not a week for the size of the families.

 

Mexicans are vegetarians?

 

The black family represents a black family’s diet, which is a small minority, not USA diet for the whole population.

 

Baguettes for a family in China? Not a sign of any Chinese vegetable?

 

Bhutan, not much food for a family of 12 for a week. I don’t think the people there are all vegetarians.

 

 

dcarch

post #23 of 28

Most of the people in the world are vegetarians, i'd guess, just that it's not by choice. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #24 of 28

Even in the same country and same city, I always find it fascinating to look at other people's grocery carts at the supermarket. Sometimes it gives me ideas! 

post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcarch View Post
 

Baguettes for a family in China? Not a sign of any Chinese vegetable?

 

I thought those were the "crullers", a fried bread often eaten with breakfast. Not a baguette. And there are the oddball squash/melon things it looks like to me. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #26 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcarch View Post
 

I don't know how much cultural meaning to give to those pictures.

 

Culture : 

 

the beliefs, customs, arts, etc., of a particular society, group, place, or time

: a particular society that has its own beliefs, ways of life, art, etc.

: a way of thinking, behaving, or working that exists in a place or organization (such as a business)

 

I'd say it has a lot of cultural meaning. 

post #27 of 28

This may be heading a bit off topic, but not really that far.  And it may take some time to explain.  Bear with me.

 

One of my favorite episodes of M.A.S.H. involved Christmas.  Folks were getting packages from home with all sorts of goodies in them.  They shared what they had and put on a big Christmas feast.  Except for Charles.  He, too, received boxes of goodies, but he didn't share with the other members of camp.  What he got was boxes of high end, handmade chocolates from back in Boston.  It was a family tradition for them to secretly leave these treats on the doorsteps of local orphanages back home, so he did the same thing - slipped over to the local orphanage and left the chocolates, anonymously.

 

So Charles is sitting in the mess tent and one of the motor pool guys starts eating one of these very unique candies.  Charles recognizes it as one destined for the orphans and gets very irate, finding out the candies went on the black market instead of into children's mouths.  He ends up going to see the priest heading the orphanage and rants and roars about depriving the children of a Christmas pleasure.  The priest responds with an explanation that yes, the chocolates would have given the children a moment or two of pleasure.  But with the money he got by selling them he could provide the children with rice and cabbage for months, something they needed far more than a bite of candy.

 

I often think about that episode as I sit with my family at a table heavily laden with holiday goodies, a bountiful feast of flavors.  Not everyone on the planet gets to do that.

 

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #28 of 28

In every case, it appears that as a country rises out of abject poverty, they can't wait to start buying packaged, processed food.  I don't see this as detrimental to those folk's health though.  Food prep becomes less of an all day chore, and more like a necessary task that has to be fitted in with a busy schedule.

Another factor to consider, is what percentage of a family's income is required for food.  There is a huge difference there, between say, Mali and Canada.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › A Week of Groceries In Different Countries [Pictures]