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Chicken stock

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
About to make my first batch of chicken stock. The recipes and videos say to use bone. I bought a two pack of whole chicken at costco and was wondering if I could make an equally good stock if I were to boil the chicken after cutting it up.

Would I have to clean the meat off the bones first or would it be okay to keep it on?

I do intend on skinning the bird first.

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post #2 of 23

It's an efficiency thing more than anything. Using the meat for other purposes gives you that use, then the bones for the stock giving you that use. Boiling up meat to discard makes for a pretty expensive stock. The flavor is somewhat different as well. 

 

Debone the carcass and cook it whole. It's a good technique, but a little tricky the first few times you do it. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post
 

Debone the carcass and cook it whole.

Why? 

post #4 of 23

Well, the OP wants the bones for the stock. This gives you the bones separate from the meat more easily than disjointing the bird and then deboning those pieces, at least in my opinion.  You can still separate it into individual boneless cuts from here, but this preserves the most options for what you can do with the chicken from that point. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post
 

This gives you the bones separate from the meat more easily than disjointing the bird and then deboning those pieces, at least in my opinion.  

Thanks Phatch. 

post #6 of 23

The only time that I make stock is if I have cooked a bird, be it chicken or turkey and first served the roasted meat as a meal.  I roast the carcass or the bones with any bits of meat clinging to them, along with the airomatics the next day.  Once done, I chuck the lot into my stock pot to simmer with just barely enough water to cover along with some garlic cloves,

parsley stems (I save those when I bring home a bunch), thyme, rosemary, black peppercorns and bay leaves

(or in fancy-pants-chef-talk a bouquet grani  ;)  ).  Strain, cool and package up for the freezer.

               

post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by calcmandan View Post

About to make my first batch of chicken stock. The recipes and videos say to use bone. I bought a two pack of whole chicken at costco and was wondering if I could make an equally good stock if I were to boil the chicken after cutting it up.

Would I have to clean the meat off the bones first or would it be okay to keep it on?

I do intend on skinning the bird first.
 

 

Please, use a whole chicken and do NOT cut it and do NOT remove the skin!!

 

Here's how to make a fantastic stock:

- put the whole chicken in a large cooking pot and cover with COLD water.

- bring to a boil and let boil vividly for 2-3 minutes.

- drain the cooking liquid that will now be full of impurities. Wash the chicken under cold running water and rub with your hand. All of this will guarantee you a nice clear stock. If you don't do this, the stock will be cloudy.

- start again; put the chicken in the pot, cover with COLD water and bing to a boil.

- reduce the fire and let simmer.

- add aromatics like onion, celery, leek, mushrooms, pepper corns, all spice, bay leaf, thyme...

- let simmer for no longer than 45 minutes. At this stage the chicken meat will be cooked perfectly.

- remove all the meat and set aside. Put the bones and skin back in the pot and let simmer for another 30 minutes.

- sieve and refrigerate overnight. All fat will now be on top of the stock. Remove that.

- you now have a very tasty chicken stock

 

This is not necessary, but you can reduce that stock to about half and you will be left with a gelatinous concentrated stock like this;

 

What to do with the cooked chicken meat?

- Warm dish; make a roux with butter and flour. Add some of the chicken stock and a little cream. Add cooked chicken meat and sautéed mushrooms. Let warm through.

 

- Cold dish; make a mayo, add curry powder to taste and mix well. Add cold cooked chicken meat. Put on a crunchy baguette. Yummm!

post #8 of 23

One chicken can bring you many meals.  My method is similar to ChrisBelgium's but not quite.

 

Use a whole chicken, do not remove the skin!  Wash it really well and remove any little feathers off it. Remove the innards, but keep the neck and throw that in the stock pot too! Place the chicken and neck in a pot with just enough cold water to to cover it.  And then,

 

1. Bring to a very soft simmer, as soon as you see white foam come to the top remove with a spoon or a skimmer.  Continue to do this as the chicken slowly simmers until there is no more foam to remove.  Never allow it to boil otherwise the foam and impurities will go right back to the bottom of the stock.

2. Once you've removed all the impurities you can now add your aromatics.  This is what I put in: 2 onions, 2 carrots, a whole lot of celery, 1-2 garlic cloves, 2 bay leaves, 1 tsp tomato paste, whole peppercorns, salt.

3. Put the lid on and turn the heat to the lowest possible setting.  As long-time member we haven't seen around here in a long time BDL used to say, stock needs steep like tea - so never ever boil or even simmer!  The water should not be moving at all, it should just be really hot for a long time and that will ensure a nice clear stock.

4. At the one hour mark the meat is cooked.  I remove the chicken carcass and pull off the meat which is pretty easy to do with a fork and a pair of tongs.  I dump the bone/carcass/skin back into the pot as I go.  

5. At this point I have my chef's treat which is warm poached chicken meat sprinkled with a little salt, there's nothing better in this world than fresh poached chicken!  The rest of the chicken meat is saved!

6. Continue cooking the stock with bones another 2hrs and then drain and voila!  

 

What to do with the meat?  I chop some of it up and put it in the soup, or I make chicken salad, or quesadillas with it, and I always always always use whatever is left the next day to make chicken pot pie.  Yummo!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #9 of 23

(edited for clarity)


Edited by Dillbert - 10/15/13 at 12:16pm
post #10 of 23
Who said they throw out the meat??

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #11 of 23

What? throw out the meat? where was that, did I miss something? why would you do such a thing in this economy?  I'm trying to make very penny scream 'uncle' !

AND did everyone hear of this thing called chicken schmaltz?  It's a very good thing and imparts a ton of flavor.

post #12 of 23

If you threw away the meat in a restaurant setting, the  boss would throw you out.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #13 of 23

If you cook the meat for the full stock time, it's overcooked, of poor texture and flavor. If you pull the meat early and keep up with the bones, the meat can be used well. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

 

 

... What to do with the meat?  I chop some of it up...  and I always always always use whatever is left the next day to make chicken pot pie.  Yummo!

 

    

 

It's just about that time of the year for comfy foods ... YUM-O-LICIOUS!!!

post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post
 

If you cook the meat for the full stock time, it's overcooked, of poor texture and flavor. If you pull the meat early and keep up with the bones, the meat can be used well.

Very true. That's why I suggest to cook the chicken no longer than 45 minutes. Nothing very strict about it; 45-60 minutes is fine; it all depends, like on the size of the bird or whatever factor like cooking temperature and what not.

However, in the old days even more than now, people used old hens that stopped laying eggs to make this kind of stock.Of course you need a longer cooking time then; just test with the tip of a knife from time to time; the knife has to go in easily.  Problem is that you will not find these older birds easily. Even then, that meat was so full of flavor and even more fit for using it to make things like a classic vol-au-vent and other preparations. A modern pedestrian supermarket chicken tastes nowhere near to an older hen! Maybe we forgot that stock is merely a by-product of cooking tough meat for a longer time to make it consumable, be it chicken, beef or other meat. The meat was eaten, the stock was used to make a sauce; I even remember feast meals where an enormous ox-tongue was cooked like that and served in a "Madeira" sauce, based on the stock it was swimming in for hours. Picture of what we call vol-au-vent, even without the puff pastry shell;

 


Edited by ChrisBelgium - 10/16/13 at 3:31am
post #16 of 23

Not many remember that ChefTalk has been around since 2000. As a result we have tons of "gold" in the archives. Here is a how-to article from a fantastic chef.

 

How To Make White Stock (Aka chicken stock)

http://www.cheftalk.com/a/how-to-make-white-stock

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post

It's an efficiency thing more than anything. Using the meat for other purposes gives you that use, then the bones for the stock giving you that use. Boiling up meat to discard makes for a pretty expensive stock. The flavor is somewhat different as well. 

 

Debone the carcass and cook it whole. It's a good technique, but a little tricky the first few times you do it. 


I followed your advice last weekend. There was a delay since I caught the flu. I made a good 3 gallons of chicken stock following your process and it's all in the freezer thank you very much.

I used tongs to get all the meat off and boy was it easy. Since then I've used that poached meat to make tacos and lasagna and could not believe how tender the meat was.

Thanks again for all the great responses.

Sent from my non-iPhone.
post #18 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

One chicken can bring you many meals.  My method is similar to ChrisBelgium's but not quite.

 

Use a whole chicken, do not remove the skin!  Wash it really well and remove any little feathers off it. Remove the innards, but keep the neck and throw that in the stock pot too! Place the chicken and neck in a pot with just enough cold water to to cover it.  And then,

 

1. Bring to a very soft simmer, as soon as you see white foam come to the top remove with a spoon or a skimmer.  Continue to do this as the chicken slowly simmers until there is no more foam to remove.  Never allow it to boil otherwise the foam and impurities will go right back to the bottom of the stock.

2. Once you've removed all the impurities you can now add your aromatics.  This is what I put in: 2 onions, 2 carrots, a whole lot of celery, 1-2 garlic cloves, 2 bay leaves, 1 tsp tomato paste, whole peppercorns, salt.

3. Put the lid on and turn the heat to the lowest possible setting.  As long-time member we haven't seen around here in a long time BDL used to say, stock needs steep like tea - so never ever boil or even simmer!  The water should not be moving at all, it should just be really hot for a long time and that will ensure a nice clear stock.

4. At the one hour mark the meat is cooked.  I remove the chicken carcass and pull off the meat which is pretty easy to do with a fork and a pair of tongs.  I dump the bone/carcass/skin back into the pot as I go.  

5. At this point I have my chef's treat which is warm poached chicken meat sprinkled with a little salt, there's nothing better in this world than fresh poached chicken!  The rest of the chicken meat is saved!

6. Continue cooking the stock with bones another 2hrs and then drain and voila!  

 

What to do with the meat?  I chop some of it up and put it in the soup, or I make chicken salad, or quesadillas with it, and I always always always use whatever is left the next day to make chicken pot pie.  Yummo!


I meant to quote you. I followed your advice. Thank you

Sent from my non-iPhone.
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by calcmandan View Post


I meant to quote you. I followed your advice. Thank you

Sent from my non-iPhone.

 

Me? Me?  I'm honored and so glad it worked out.  I just made some stock too and used half of it to make an avgolemono soup which was perfect for this brisk weather we're having.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #20 of 23

I too made chicken stock this week, but I used the bones from a rotisserie chicken I picked up commercially.  I deboned the roasted chicken. Made stock. Made pot pies the first night with some gravy from the stock. Last night, I made a savory chinese steamed egg custard with some of the stock with a sauce and topping from some of the chicken and stock. Debated a chicken salad filling with the remains of the chicken today, but didn't. Not sure where the last of the chicken and stock will appear in the week's menu just yet. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #21 of 23

RARELY discard bones from any kinda chicken without making some stock.  WHole chicken, pieces (roasted/grilled)... there's  sone pretty much FREE stock in there.  Bones, water, celery/onion/carrots and a simmer.  No real WORK involved and if I get 3-4 cups... that's great!  From frozen, can go into about ANYTHING that needs more liquid... AND flavor.

 

Wish I had $$ & room for a MASSIVE freezer... would have nice neat shelves with stock ready to go.  I PRESSURE can stocks sometimes... MEAT involved and LOW acid requires pressure canning... unless ya wanna make yourself SICK!?!

 

Bought a "bargain" ham a while back... NOT the best I've had, but did make some decent ham salad and croquettes??  Made "ham-ade" from the bone... nice for cooking veggies in instead of plain water.

post #22 of 23

I'm going to make chicken stock from raw chicken pieces. Will there be any adverse affects on flavor or clarify if I also throw in my stash of cooked rotisserie chicken leftover bones and pieces? The ultimate stock will not be used for anything "fancy", but I would want it to be flavorful and - if possible - clear and gelatinous.

post #23 of 23

Shouldn't affect clarity. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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