or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Food & Equipment Reviews › Cooking Equipment Reviews › Is ceramic the best cookware to buy?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Is ceramic the best cookware to buy?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I am a stay at home mom and get a lot of my cooking info from tv shows, magazines and books. I recently heard a celebrity chef say which type of pan was the best to buy but I cannot remember what he said. I believe he said ceramic, but with children in the house I may have heard incorrectly. Any thoughts on this subject?
post #2 of 10

There are two categories of ceramic they may have referred to. Ceramic coated cast iron and/or non-stick ceramics.  I suspect they were talking about the ceramic coated cast iron. Or they were shilling a sponsors over-priced non-stick ceramic brand. 

 

For the kinds of things I interpret you to be cooking, I think you'd be fine with inexpensive non-stick (teflon) coated aluminum fry pans. Don't go expensive here. It's not worth it. I think it's worth the extra versatility for these pans to have all metal handles so they can go in the oven under the broiler. Stay cool handles aren't worth the limitations they impose. These will last you 2-4 years most likely, then need replacing. Keep your eye open for good cheap replacements at all times so you have a replacement pan in storage ready to take over when one of these cheapies fails. A 12" non-stick pan shouldn't exceed $25.00 right now that meets my criteria. 

 

For saucepans and pots, stainless with a heavy disk bottom will work great and they're not expensive.  You want the least amount of pan sticking out past the disk as possible. Lots of really cheap cookware has fairly exposed edges that will scorch your food so watch out for that. Sizes are sort of determined by how many you cook for. I'm fond of 2 and 4 quart sauce pans. 1 quart saucepans aren't really that useful imho.  12 quart is the generally recommended stock pot size and I agree. But you might feel that's too big. A 6 quart-ish dutch oven style is also handy for braises, stews, soups and such. 

 

I would add a quality tri-ply clad 12" saute pan as well. There are some things that just need to develop fond and be non-reactive and this is the way to do it. These don't have to be expensive. Tramontina makes a good one you can get on-line at walmart.com for about $50.00. Or Calphalon on sale and such. 

 

Generally, sets are not recommended. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #3 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post
 

There are two categories of ceramic they may have referred to. 

There's another category: pure ceramic, that's not non-stick. http://www.emilehenryusa.com/Flame-Top-Braiser-3-4-qt-Red-plu614593.html

post #4 of 10

That's true. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #5 of 10

I agree with phatch about keeping inexpensive pans in stock as replacements, UNLESS, of course, you don't feel like replacing your pans every year or two.  I personally use Le Creuset enameled cast iron for my pots.  I totally get it that people don't want such heavy cookware (including my wife), or such a heavy price tag, but it's lasted for a REALLY long time now.  I bought some of the Simply Calphalon Ceramic Nonstick pans for my wife about a year and a half ago, and to be honest, they are pretty amazing.  They heat well and cook evenly, and they are lightweight.  You can get a set of two at Bed, Bath and Beyond for around $50, and eighteen months into them, they are holding up well.

post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thank you all. Buying good pans can be scary especially reading all of the different reviews online. Not sure all are truthful
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrssee23 View Post

Thank you all. Buying good pans can be scary especially reading all of the different reviews online. Not sure all are truthful

Advice you'll often see on forums such as this one is to go to a professional restaurant supply store (or visit one of their online counterpart). They usually have very good quality basic equipment without costing an arm and a leg. You won't see the all new shiny bright polished $220 All clad pan there, but you'll find a solid $65 alternative that is a bit less shiny but performs just as well. 

post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

Advice you'll often see on forums such as this one is to go to a professional restaurant supply store (or visit one of their online counterpart). They usually have very good quality basic equipment without costing an arm and a leg. You won't see the all new shiny bright polished $220 All clad pan there, but you'll find a solid $65 alternative that is a bit less shiny but performs just as well. 


Soooooo true!

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #9 of 10

WHAT? Recommending inexpensive Teflon?? NOOOO! Teflon has been proven to be unsafe for your health, and especially the inexpensive stuff! I would NEVER EVER buy or even use any Teflon! The best cookware IMHO and is what I use every day, is cast iron

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by TOMVOELL View Post

WHAT? Recommending inexpensive Teflon?? NOOOO! Teflon has been proven to be unsafe for your health, and especially the inexpensive stuff! I would NEVER EVER buy or even use any Teflon! The best cookware IMHO and is what I use every day, is cast iron

Normally I wouldn't do this, but nothing has been "proven". Please read this, from one rather authoritative source:

http://m.cancer.org/cancer/cancercauses/othercarcinogens/athome/teflon-and-perfluorooctanoic-acid--pfoa

And this:

https://www.google.com/amp/www.goodhousekeeping.com/cooking-tools/cookware-reviews/amp17426/nonstick-cookware-safety-facts/?client=safari

Be educated; not scared!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cooking Equipment Reviews
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Food & Equipment Reviews › Cooking Equipment Reviews › Is ceramic the best cookware to buy?