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Watermelon Shebet

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hello everyone! 

I'm going to make a watermelon sherbet. Is it tasty? 

post #2 of 12

Of course if you make it tasty then it will be tasty.

post #3 of 12

I make watermelon granita.Just process the watermelon flesh in a food processor with some sugar and some lime juice, freeze and break down the ice crystals with a fork every 1/2hr or so for a couple hours. It's delicious. 


Edited by French Fries - 10/21/13 at 5:19pm
post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

I make watermelon granita.Just process the watermelon flesh in a food processor with some sugar and some lime juice, freeze and break down the ice crystals with a fork every 1/2hr or so for a couple hours. It's delicious. 

And yes I know, to taste.  But I need a starting point.  The proportions:  watermelon to lime juice to sugar and I'm assuming granulated sugar.

For I'm one of those who will always need a solid starting point.  A solid recipe as it were.  Thank you Mssr. Ruhlman for your basic tarte recipe/proportion as a given 3:2:1.


Edited by kokopuffs - 10/21/13 at 7:21pm

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #5 of 12
I don't use a recipe, I just taste. Some watermelons are sweeter than others, so if you used the same ratio every time, you'd end up with inconsistent results.
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

I don't use a recipe, I just taste. Some watermelons are sweeter than others, so if you used the same ratio every time, you'd end up with inconsistent results.

Some of us need a starting point.  People learn in one of three ways:  reading, observing, or doing.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #7 of 12

I don't know, kokopuffs, it's not even a recipe really, I mean, when you prepare sliced tomatoes with salt, olive oil and basil, you don't need a recipe or ratio, even as a starting point, right? The tomatoes are your starting point, you just add some salt, some basil etc...

 

Here, the watermelon is my starting point.

 

Start with just watermelon. Taste. Does it need sugar? Add sugar. Does it need an acid to perk up the flavor? Add lime, or lemon. Some watermelons will be just perfect and you may not need to add anything. Usually when I make this, it's because I feel like the watermelon isn't very good to eat on its own, so usually a bit of sugar with a bit of lime juice...

 

It also depends on how sweet you like your granita to be: for all we know, you may not like the one I make, because I don't like things to be too sweet. So you'll have to make it for your taste. 

 

Also when tasting keep in mind that things appear a little less sweet once frozen, so make the unfrozen mixture a bit sweeter than what you'd like the resulting frozen granita to be. 

 

Or if you absolutely need a starting point, just start with something arbitrary, like say 4 cups of watermelon flesh for 2 TB of sugar for 2 TB lime juice, see how you like it, take notes etc... personally I try to not work like that, but maybe that'll work better for you. 

 

If you try it, let us know how it turned out! :) 

post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

I don't know, kokopuffs, it's not even a recipe really, Here, the watermelon is my starting point.

 

...Or if you absolutely need a starting point, just start with something arbitrary, like say 4 cups of watermelon flesh for 2 TB of sugar for 2 TB lime juice, see how you like it, take notes etc... personally I try to not work like that, but maybe that'll work better for you. 

 

If you try it, let us know how it turned out! :) 

That's what I'm looking for.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #9 of 12

Here's a starting point that might help: http://frenchfood.about.com/od/sorbetrecipes/r/melonsorbet.htm

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #10 of 12
Bobbycooks, I assume that you mean sorbet when you write "shebet"?

I love to make that in high summer with much smaller Cavaillon melons which have orangy flesh and are quite sweet when ripe and more dense than water melon. I would also rather make a granita with a watermelon like FF suggests instead of a sorbet. Other choices of melon; use "cantaloupe" types like Cavaillon or Charantais. Or Galia melon from Israel or those yellow Honey melons.

Let's assume that you can find a good sweet melon as mentioned. Making a sorbet is so easy;
- peel and deseed the melon
- cut in chunks and put in a food processor to purée
Use around 250 grams of that melon purée.
- boil 100 grams water with 85 grams of sugar until the sugar has dissolved. I always add a squeeze of fresh lemon juice to boost the flavor.
- let that syrup cool and mix in the melon purée
- let it turn in an icecream maker or if you don't have one; put in the freezer and remove every 40 minutes (for the next 2-3 hours) to stir with a fork (to break the ice crystals).

You need to add that syrupy water to make a sorbet or the ice-cream machine will not be able to make a nice smooth sorbet.
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post
 

Of course if you make it tasty then it will be tasty.

:):):) I'll try!

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post
 

Here's a starting point that might help: http://frenchfood.about.com/od/sorbetrecipes/r/melonsorbet.htm

Oh! Thanks!

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