or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Recipes › Request: Scalllops over Pumpkin Puree w Apple/Rasin Chutney
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Request: Scalllops over Pumpkin Puree w Apple/Rasin Chutney

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

We were out this weekend at The Oceanaire in Minneapolis for my wifes birthday, my first time being there.  (First post here as a member, long time lurker, and I do the cooking in our home)

 

I had this dish which was Scallops over a Pumpkin Puree which was absolutely amazing, I would put this dish in my top 5 ever.

 

Since then, I have not been able to get it out of my head/mouth, and using my google skills has yet to come up with something that I feel would recreate the flavors well enough.

 

I am fairly confident I can get the chutney close enough to where it needs to be, but the puree has me boggled.

 

While not terribly appealing to the eye, it packed such a punch of flavor, I had everyone at the table try, all were equally shocked.  It was SWEET!  Way sweeter than I would have ever thought you could get away with.  (We also split a side of maple sweet pots which were coined to be "sweet enough to be a desert" and they paled in comparison)  Back on track to the description:

- I would say this rivals the sweetness of pumpkin pie (have a hard time beleiving pre-canned would be used)

- The spices in it gave it a full body, enough to take away from the sweetness.  Cinnamon, nutmeg, (allspice?, ginger?, mace?, clove?)

 

That being said, I am fishing for some thoughts on how to recreate this.  To throw in another wrench... I would love to try and do this dairy free if possible (wife has an allergy) We can get by with coconut or almond milk(I know this may change flavoring or texture, but im just looking to get close)

 

Any insight would be appreciated, thanks in advance for the wealth of knowledge already gathered!

post #2 of 9

At low heat simmer your pumpkin to soft.  Then run it thru a food mill like this one

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #3 of 9

be aware that pumpkins grown for 'jack-o-lanterns' are different than pumpkins used for culinary purposes.

 

it's not an absolute / exclusive thing, but research "sugar pumpkins" or "pie pumpkins" for info - some markets stock them, some not.

post #4 of 9

Damn, never knew that!

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post
 

Damn, never knew that!


one learns right quick after cooking up 30-40 pounds of "the wrong pumpkin". . . .

 

moi?  did I implicate moi?.....

post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dillbert View Post
 


one learns right quick after cooking up 30-40 pounds of "the wrong pumpkin". . . .

 

moi?  did I implicate moi?.....


Nope never knew this stufff....

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Would be sure to use the pie pumpkin or baking pumpkin, just was not sure how much and what else someone may have added in to get it to that sweetness/richness
post #8 of 9

Well, after all, I really like my food mill for food processing.  Apple butters, herbspuree, and alll.....

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #9 of 9
jvanistri, just a few days ago, I posted a pumpkin gnocchi recipe in the "What's for dinner" thread; http://www.cheftalk.com/t/69652/what-did-you-have-for-dinner/2340#post_446501

I strongly suggest to use a Hokkaido pumpkin if you want a rather sweet one. Alternative suggestion would be a butternut squash. Both are very firm pumpkins and are best roasted before using them in gnocchi, soups, purées. Cut them in wedges, peel them and put them in a 180°C/350°F oven for an hour. Rub in olive oil before they go in the oven and add any spices or herbs you like. Roasting these pumpkins really gives them a concentrated flavor that you will certainly like! When using them with scallops, my suggestion would be "less is more" when adding spices, but I can read you like bold flavors. As always; so you're the cook, it's your decision which spices to use. I'll give away a little secret; just before mixing into purée, grate a little zeste from an orange over them...

After being roasted, you can simply mix them into a fine purée. I used a food mill to purée the pumpkin with the potato. There's no starch in pumpkins, so you can safely use an electric device to make the purée as smooth as you want, even from 100% pumpkin. I wouldn't add any other liquid at all. If necessary, add a bit of good butter!

This is how Hokkaido pumpkin looks like. In the second picture you can see left-over roasted wedges (lots of dried thyme used when roasting them) that will be used for a soup;

Pumpkin & potato gnocchi 1 Pumpkin & potato gnocchi 2
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Recipes
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Recipes › Request: Scalllops over Pumpkin Puree w Apple/Rasin Chutney