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Perfect Roast Chicken - Page 2

post #31 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

 

I want my chicken as juicy as possible.

 

OK I admit I was a little self-absorbed in making that statement, it's true that not everybody wants a full-bodied wine either.

 

Rick

post #32 of 55

Here's my slow-roasted chicken! :)

 

post #33 of 55
Sweet! Throw me a spud!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #34 of 55

aaahhh, the sweet roast of success (g)

post #35 of 55

Nice chicken FF! And succulent potatoes.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #36 of 55

Thanks guys. :)

post #37 of 55

now that the light side of 'low&slow' has won you over,,,,,

 

flat iron steak; salt/pepper/oil; allow to stand to room temp

(you need the oil to keep it from surface drying)

options: garlic/onion salt; celery seed; herbs your choice....

 

then 1-1.5 hrs at 250'F - thermometer recommended to achieve your doneness desire.

slice thin on the bias cross grain.

 

better than flat iron done anyway anywhere else I've experienced.....

post #38 of 55

Aside from the already stated caveat that there are a thousand ways to roast a chicken, here's mine.

 

I cut out the backbone and butterfly the chicken. This gets more skin facing up which means more crispy skin. I dry it as well as possible with a paper towel to aide the skin in crisping. From there, its just a matter of seasoning. I do either wet rubs or dry rubs. A dry rub is self explanatory. A wet rub might be made of chopped rosemary and thyme, lemon zest, minced garlic, cracked pepper and kosher salt, wetted with enough olive oil to give the mixture a "paste"-like texture. Then, its rubbed on the top and bottom of the chicken which then goes on a rack to roast. I roast at 325 in a convection oven or 350 in non-convection for about 1 hr 10 mins, depending on the size of the chicken. Its cooks fairly quickly since it's butterflied.

 

The secret to any great chicken is having the ability to know when its done but not overdone by looking at it and touching it. You can make really juicy chicken with just about any cooking method if you don't overcook it.

Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

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Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

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post #39 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dillbert View Post
 

now that the light side of 'low&slow' has won you over,,,,,

 

flat iron steak; salt/pepper/oil; allow to stand to room temp

(you need the oil to keep it from surface drying)

options: garlic/onion salt; celery seed; herbs your choice....

 

then 1-1.5 hrs at 250'F - thermometer recommended to achieve your doneness desire.

slice thin on the bias cross grain.

 

better than flat iron done anyway anywhere else I've experienced.....

 

This goes COMPLETELY AGAINST what I've learned over the past few decades. Which only means: I HAVE to try it!!!! :lol: Thanks a lot for sharing the idea. 

 

PS: Do you have to sear at the end or no? I picture a gray steak coming out of the oven....??

post #40 of 55

The steak technique is usually seared at the end of the low roast. Google Reverse Sear and you'll find quite a bit about it. 

 

Not to say that Dillbert is reverse searing as he's the sort who would have mentioned it if he was. 

 

I don't know if you saw my thread on an oil poached pork tenderloin, but it's sort of the same idea. A low heat flavorful liquid to cook the meat slowly.  http://www.cheftalk.com/t/76226/oil-poaching-chinese-style  I painted the tenderloin in soy to give it some exterior color. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #41 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post
 

I don't know if you saw my thread on an oil poached pork tenderloin, but it's sort of the same idea. A low heat flavorful liquid to cook the meat slowly.  http://www.cheftalk.com/t/76226/oil-poaching-chinese-style  I painted the tenderloin in soy to give it some exterior color. 

Wow, that looks incredible too! So many new techniques to try! :) Thanks Phatch. 

post #42 of 55

. . . no sear, not grey.  just-jummy-jummy....

applies in my experience only to flat iron steak.

 

when the snow is up to the window sills,,,,, I'll very hot sear a ribeye in cast iron thence into a low oven still-in-the-hot-pan to finish.

it's not lump charcoal grilled, but you have to close your eyes and imagine to tell the diff.

 

have tried the steak approach "Sears&Roebuck" after the oven - got the -buck part; not my pot of tea - mucho go with sear first.

post #43 of 55

Thank you Dillbert, I definitely will try this. I have, on the other hand, no idea what "Sears&Roebuck" means, or if it's a play on words or the name of a restaurant....?

post #44 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

This goes COMPLETELY AGAINST what I've learned over the past few decades. Which only means: I HAVE to try it!!!! lol.gif  Thanks a lot for sharing the idea. 

PS: Do you have to sear at the end or no? I picture a gray steak coming out of the oven....??
I want to try it too. What's a flat iron?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #45 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

I want to try it too. What's a flat iron?
It's a steak cut from the chuck.
post #46 of 55

Yes, as I recall it is a variation of top blade steak from the chuck.  Tasty stuff, one of the more tender chunks of chuck.  I've always grilled it fast and hot to the rare side of mid rare.  I can imagine the slow cook method would be quite tasty will try soon.

 

The ones I've seen are about 1.5 - 2 pounds, about an inch thick, a few inches wide and maybe 8 - 9 inches long.  They look similar to flank steaks, but the grain structure isn't quite as pronounced.

 

mjb.

 

Dug up some info:  http://confessionsofabutcher.blogspot.com/2005/12/flat-iron-steak-hype-or-heart.html

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #47 of 55

Darn, I doubt any of my local butchers know anything about this, they're pretty inept.  They can't even butterfly a pork butt.  Is there a different cut this can be done with?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #48 of 55

I'm not an expert on "cuts" other than to know a lot of the same thing goes by different names....

 

"flat iron steak" has achieved the (TV) fame of "shanks" (think osso bucco and "Emeril Live" - long time passing . . .) - used to be very inexpensive, now promoted to top-dollar status. 

“shanks” – which used to be in the half a $1/lb range are now $5-8/lb; more like $20/lb if you discount the weight of the bone….

flat iron steak is running essentially same cost/lb as rib eye in our area.

 

“similar” cuts from different areas get labeled “plate” / “flank” / “skirt” and even brisket.

You can also try for a “top blade” cut.

 

"steaks" are typically cuts that run across the grain; whereas "filet" (think fish) are cuts more pronounced "along" the grain.

 

which not does explain terms / names like "filet mignon" – the beef tenderloin cut across the grain into “chunks” – wrapped in bacon and sold only in exchange for gold ingots….

or ‘flat iron steak’ – as the grain of the meat runs lengthwise similar to tenderloin.

 

which methinks also could explain why “searing” is “different” in this case.  The surface of a long grain cut does not exude proteins/liquids in the same manner as the surface of a cross grain cut.

 

Although the reference link speaks to how well flat iron takes to a marinade, I never go there – salt/pepper/oiled at oven time – low&slow – we enjoy the stellar flavor of the beef “undoctored”  it’s not that I don’t like soy/Woozie/A1/etc sauces – it’s just a case of “dang good meat” - with none of that.

 

“chuck” is loosely a ‘tougher’ cut – noted for flavor, trait often attributed to ‘included fat’ aka ‘marbling’ – but because the ‘flat iron’ grain runs along the length of the “chunk of meat” not a lot of the ‘fat’ immediately renders out and drips off as it is cooked.  The ‘flat iron steaks’ I find (cyro-vac packed) appear at preparation to be fairly lean - I'm thinking the 'fat' is very finely 'en-grained' / distributed in the meat.....

post #49 of 55

Did some roast chicken for dinner tonight.  Spatchcocked, laid on celery ribs, salt, pepper, thyme and olive oil.

 

 

I plated a leg and a thigh for Karen, after removing the skin from the thigh.  Karen grabs the drumstick, skin on, and says "You're a bad influence on me.  I used to not eat the skin, but you make it so tasty!"

 

Another small milestone.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #50 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post
 

The steak technique is usually seared at the end of the low roast. Google Reverse Sear and you'll find quite a bit about it. 

 

Not to say that Dillbert is reverse searing as he's the sort who would have mentioned it if he was. 

 

I don't know if you saw my thread on an oil poached pork tenderloin, but it's sort of the same idea. A low heat flavorful liquid to cook the meat slowly.  http://www.cheftalk.com/t/76226/oil-poaching-chinese-style  I painted the tenderloin in soy to give it some exterior color. 

 

Seems like a lot of fine dining restaurants use this technique now. They vac-seal the cut, cook to temp in an immersion circulator, place in a hold-a-mat, then pull out and sear it when fired. It produces very good results but I still prefer pan searing in a cast iron or carbon steel pan and then finishing in the oven on a wire rack at 300 degrees convection.

 

As for chicken. Dry the chicken, tie the feet, rub with salt and pepper, and drizzle with olive oil. Roast on a wire rack over a sheet pan at 325 degrees convection till done.

 

I did an interesting chicken at one place I worked that we baked in a large pyrex, We put fresh hay in the bottom slathered the chicken with butter salt and pepper, then put a roll of bread dough around the rim jamming the lid on. Once baked the bread sealed the lid shut. When it was done you cracked open the bread seal, the smell when you opened it was amazing. Juiciest chicken I've ever had but no crispy skin.

post #51 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by beastmasterflex View Post
 

 

Seems like a lot of fine dining restaurants use this technique now. They vac-seal the cut, cook to temp in an immersion circulator, place in a hold-a-mat, then pull out and sear it when fired. It produces very good results but I still prefer pan searing in a cast iron or carbon steel pan and then finishing in the oven on a wire rack at 300 degrees convection.

 

As for chicken. Dry the chicken, tie the feet, rub with salt and pepper, and drizzle with olive oil. Roast on a wire rack over a sheet pan at 325 degrees convection till done.

 

I did an interesting chicken at one place I worked that we baked in a large pyrex, We put fresh hay in the bottom slathered the chicken with butter salt and pepper, then put a roll of bread dough around the rim jamming the lid on. Once baked the bread sealed the lid shut. When it was done you cracked open the bread seal, the smell when you opened it was amazing. Juiciest

chicken I've ever had but no crispy skin.

There was an Iron Chef episode where an actual Frenchman French Chef did a chicken like this, no seasoning other than what the hay imparted.  He buttered the chicken after cooking and the judges complained it a bad move.  He did another chicken where he seared the skin by rolling the chick around in an enameled dutch oven, then coated it with a course almond paste, I don't recall how the cooking was finished.  The latter was the judges favorite of the comp, but they gave the win to there luntsman Sekai.  Well blood's thicker than water I guess.  In a followup comp the judges were French and you can guess which nationality won that one.

 

Rick

post #52 of 55

As a former waiter at Zuni Cafe in San Francisco, I am partial to Judy Rodgers' roasted chicken.  However, just tried a roasted chicken in milk (Jamie Oliver) and it was/is fantastic!  Using the leftovers for chicken and ricotta manicotti...shall be delish for sure and am doubling the recipe!

post #53 of 55

no one ever uses fennel? Onion, fennel, carrots, potatoes, and stuff the cavity of bird with halved lemons.  Delicious moist chicken and wonderful veggies to boot!

post #54 of 55

Flank or London Broil works well

post #55 of 55
Quote:

 Dilbert

>>WARNIG!

>>You must use my exact numbers for the first 28:17 of cooking or court absolute disaster.

 

or one could just start low & slow and crisp up the skin at the end.  which curiously does not court absolute disaster.....

 

Quote:

Rick

I will have to first check the numbers on that. ;-)~

 

Actually I already knew the numbers here.  You can crisp at the end if you have a pro-grade gas oven, but I think consumer ovens in general, or at least electrics like I have in particular, just take a little too long to get to temperature, in mine the bird would be dust before it even got to crisping temps.  With mine you'd have to pull the chicken out and wait  10-15 min to get it up toward or at 500F.

 

Rick

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