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Commercial Gas Rice Cooker; water/rice ratio

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hello everyone!

 

I wasn't sure which section to post this question in.. hope this is the right one.

 

I just started a hot food booth at a farmer's market stand and am having a lot of minor problems here and there that I am having a hard time figuring out.

 

Priority number one though is the rice. It sucks. The rice was melded together at bottom of the pot, almost like rice cake, and all around the middle to top sections in the pot were half-raw.

 

So, I bought a Rinnai commercial propane 100 cup rice cooker to cook sticky rice (Korean/Japanese style short/medium grain rice; the newest bag I have is Calrose rice and the other one I used is in Korean and I don't know how to translate that in English). I've cooked rice at home on the stovetop many times so I'm okay with small quantities but I don't think the water/rice ratio is the same for making 50 cups of rice. I soaked about 50 cups of rice, I think, I'm totally guessing because I just poured the bag of rice in the pot and stopped where it's marked 25, which turns out from reading the manual is the line that you pour the water in after measuring out (using the measuring cup that came with) 25 cups of rice. Anyways, I put enough water in the pot to come up about 2 inches above the rice level. It soaked for about an hour and by then the water was completely soaked up. I poured in more water and I used the flat hand method which is placing my hand flat on the surface of the rice and putting only enough water so it was about and inch or so above my major knuckles (see major knuckle = http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knuckle).

 

I pressed cook, waited then let it "simmer" for about 10 - 15 minutes or so. Opened up the lid to find the entire top portion of rice was semi-raw. I fluffed it as best as I could -it was a LOT of rice and I was barely able to properly "fluff" it- and covered the pot and pressed cook again. Checked the rice to find that it was still somewhat raw on top, fluffed again, poured some water on top, pressed cook again.. think I did this a few more times but at this point the cook button wouldn't stay down.

 

Sorry for the long story. So yeah, the rice was really bad. I was thinking about doing a test run this week before I open up the booth at the market but not sure if that's a good idea if I'm not even sure what I'm doing.

 

For those that read this far.. thank you for reading. PLEASE HELP ME!!!!!!!

 

THANK YOU :cry:

post #2 of 7

Tuna, I think you might get better answers in the  cooking section----I'll ask the MOD staff if they agree.--Mike----

post #3 of 7

tuna...when I get a new appliance the first few outings the instructions are followed religiously.

This gives me the chance to kick the tires and send it back if it is not up to snuff.

You really don't know if your problem is the unit the rice or operator failure.

Naughty.

 

mimi

post #4 of 7

The Asian rice cup is 6oz. You are probably measuring using an 8oz cup.  Do not use the knuckle method for a large pot.  Use the ratio of rice to water provided on the bag.  If you want to make 50 standard cups, then you got to add water up to the 66.7 mark in the pot.

post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by tunasandwich View Post
 

I pressed cook, waited then let it "simmer" for about 10 - 15 minutes or so. Opened up the lid to find the entire top portion of rice was semi-raw.

 

In my experience with rice cookers, both home and commercial units. After it signals that the rice is cooked, leave it alone for at least 5 minutes. Do not raise the lid. Actually 10-15 minutes is better depending upon size of batch. Then raise the lid and fluff. If you buy a rice cooker to cook rice, trust it to do it's job. Resist the temptation to check on it.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #6 of 7

We cook medium grain rice with the ratio of 1:1. Every time we make rice we make a batch of 6 quarts of rice with 6 quarts of water. Comes out perpect every time. DO NOT open the lid while rick cooker is doing its job because the heat would escape.

post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

 

In my experience with rice cookers, both home and commercial units. After it signals that the rice is cooked, leave it alone for at least 5 minutes. Do not raise the lid. Actually 10-15 minutes is better depending upon size of batch. Then raise the lid and fluff. If you buy a rice cooker to cook rice, trust it to do it's job. Resist the temptation to check on it.


I use a 60 cup rice cooker, and when it signals cooked, I leave if for 15-20mins.

 

For measuring water, I use the old finger measuring technique.

 

If the top of the rice is 1in from the bottom of the pot, the water should be 1 in from the top of the uncooked rice. Just google
"measure rice with finger"

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