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What to get for a new kitchen?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Just purchased a 50's modern house, closing in a month. Part of this project involves a total kitchen redo, removing some walls to make everything open to the family room, getting rid of the formal dining room. Architect says I'll have enough room to do what I want. No set budget. It will mostly be my wife and I, with the kids visiting from college for holidays and breaks. 

Initially was was considering a 36" induction cooktop from Miele or Wolf with wall ovens. We stayed in an apartment in Barcelona this summer that had induction and I loved the speed. Part of the interest has to do with the lower blower requirements allowing for a more sleek looking hood. 

I do have some concerns about Wok cooking though, I used to do some when I had an old Thermador. Seems limited on an induction stove. 

I've also considered some of the newer type ovens like steam, combi or speed ovens, but question how much I'd use them. We currently have dual 27" ovens, one with convection and find the size to be adequate. I do have some concerns about using 24" ovens, too small for Thanksgiving?  

It seems like a range could get me most of what I want in a smaller footprint and slightly lower cost. 

Now considering the new Bluestar Platinum series. Good choice? I like the idea of the open burners, seems more efficient and easier to really clean thoroughly when needed. Not sure about how good the griddle set up is on that one. 

What else should I be looking at?  Bluestar repair network seems good in this area, spoke to one of the authorized repair guys yesterday and he really like their products. 

A very helpful salesman was steering me more towards Wolf E series or Miele, but of course he doesn't sell Bluestar. 

Would like a griddle, don't really need a grill since it's warm most of the year here and I do that outside. 

Thanks

post #2 of 7

Induction and woks work well together if you have a flat bottomed carbon steel wok. In fact, the heat response is amazing compared to the gas burners in a common home stove. 

 

There are custom induction wok stoves available as well if that's something you want to focus on. Gas too of course. And this lets you keep the round bottom wok cooking that is so important to the technique. 

 

When I replace my current gas cook top, I'm planning to go induction. I love my free standing induction burner that much, especially with my flat bottomed wok. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 


Thanks so much for your reply. The new zoneless units from Thermador and Gaggenau look like an interesting concept. Any experience with them? They are very expensive, but seems like a great idea. I especially like the idea of being able to use a griddle and the ability to place pots wherever you want. I understand you can only use 4 at once, so less than the standard 5 hob 36" units, but I would rarely use 5 at once. 

post #4 of 7

No, I've not used them. It makes a lot of sense though and gives you good flexibility. Price will come down with that in time as will being able to control more areas on the same surface. 

 

There's also tech out there to induce eddy currents in non-magnetic pans, like aluminum and copper,, and then they become induction compatible. That's not on the market yet though. 

 

For a flat bottom wok, you'll need to focus on something like an 6-8 inch burner size and get the most watts you can into that size. Most of the high wattage burners are 8-10 inches, but that might not sense your wok, nor would the heating likely be ideal. You'll need to experiment, if you can, to make sure you get a good match to your wok. 

 

If nothing else, see if you can boil water in a large pan/pot  and see what kind of boiling pattern you see. 

 

I have a concave induction burner for woks, just 1500 watts. It boils a 6 inch donut of water.

 

It's a reasonable compromise for the layout, but I'd really have liked an element at the bottom as well for a more even heat. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 7

doc-

I've been using a Max Burton 1800-watt induction hot plate for several years and I am really impressed with induction cooking.  Wish the technology had been on the market when I built my dream kitchen 10 or so years ago. I use the Burton with an enameled, cast-iron flat-bottom wok and it works great. With the greater power in your cooktop, you should be in terrific shape for stir-fry!

 

When we completely renovated our three-bedroom, two-bath condo over a span of eight months (we weren't living in it so it was really top-to-bottom,) we spent half the budget in the 8' x 13' kitchen. I love the kitchen, just wish it was a little bigger but that was not an option.

 

Do a  lot of planning, and have fun!

 

Mike  :thumb:

travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thanks, especially with how hot it gets here most of the year, I think induction will be a good way to go. Now need to pick out ovens. It's nice to have two. Will have to make up a trip to see Gaggs offerings, the plumbed in steam oven looks appealing. Expensive, but I wonder if our builder can get discounts. 

Ideally I'd like to have the Gagg zoneless induction cooktop with two of their ovens, but it may be cost prohibitive. The Thermador version of the cooktop looks very similar and supposedly has the same guts, but I don't know about the Thermador wall ovens. I know they've had some reliability problems in the recent past. I wonder how the Thermador cooktop would look with Miele or Wolf ovens, or perhaps some other brand. I hear Bluestar is coming out with electric ovens shortly. 

post #7 of 7

doc-

 

We bought a KitchenAid double electric wall oven about 14 years ago and have been quite happy with it. We took it to the remodeled condo; everything else including the furnace and a/c was new.

 

We had an appliance insurance policy at the house - about $450 per year with a $50 deductible.  My sensible wife suggested we set up a kitty against future appliance problems, since everything was new except the oven.  We opened another account, with a $40/mo automatic transfer.  We've had a few problems, but there's now $1000 sitting there  and growing, ready to lessen the sting of any difficulty.

 

Speaking of difficulty, we sprang for the German Grohe plumbing fittings: very stylish and very expensive. We've had a lot more problems with them that I think we should have. My son has had the same experience with his Grohes.If I were to do it again, I'd probably go back to my simple, tried-and-true Delta. They're pretty stylish themselves these days, though I have no experience with the recent stuff.

 

One more suggestion- if you're putting a washing machine on an upper floor, put a drain pan under it. It's not if it will leak, but when. From many years of real estate experience, I can assure you that any water leak happens at the highest possible point in the building.

 

Trust me. :mad:

 

Mike

travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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