or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Saving an "over-garlicked" dish?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Saving an "over-garlicked" dish?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

So, the day before yesterday, I made some scalloped butternut squash gratin, flavored with Parmagiano-Reggiano, thyme, garlic, onion, and a dash of nutmeg. I used raw garlic powder and way too much of it, which lead to a dish that didn't taste like butternut squash, cheese, thyme, garlic, or nutmeg - it tasted like one big platter of garlic. Not unbearable per se, but the garlic flavor was a bit overwhelming.

I decided to leave it in the oven a little longer (since garlic is much milder when fully cooked) and save it in the refrigerator for another day (thinking the refrigeration might cut the bite a little).

That day has come and I've been considering other ways to further mellow the flavor of the garlic. Maybe adding a cup or two of cream/milk (to the already cooked gratin) would make the garlic less overwhelming (it's for myself, so I don't care how the dish looks)? I would like to figure out a way to salvage this dish, because I hate throwing out food, especially when that food took a lot of effort to prepare (if I doused a baked potato with mounds of garlic powder, I'd just throw it out - but after spending literally an hour slicing squash without even using a mandoline, sauteeing onions, chopping fresh thyme leaves, etc. I hate to just throw out a completed dish).

post #2 of 8

Make a second batch without garlic, then combine. Freeze so you can spread out the eating of so much of the same thing.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post
 

Make a second batch without garlic, then combine. Freeze so you can spread out the eating of so much of the same thing.

Dilution is clearly one of the most obvious choices, but I'd rather not just add more of the same thing because it's never going to be as good as a properly prepared dish (besides, it's not one of those dishes like say mashed potatoes or soup that you can just mix together). I mean, what's better? Eating one portion of good scalloped butternut squash au gratin and one portion of bad butternut squash au gratin or two portions of not-that-good-but-not-really-that-bad scalloped butternut squash gratin? I'd honestly like to try and find a way to fix this without adding a lot more food to it.

post #4 of 8

Serve it on a healthy bed of arugula pesto and top it with a good size dollop of ricotta.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #5 of 8
You can always purée it with more boiled sweets/sugar/cream. Chinois that sucker and use it for a sauce, fritter, etc
post #6 of 8

Cut it into portions and freeze.  Use one portion to mix with eggs for a quiche, another portion to mix with mashed potatoes, add it to a soup, you get the idea.  Use a little bit of it to use as a flavoring/texture agent for something else.  

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #7 of 8

Is there such a thing as to much garlic?

post #8 of 8

You can also freeze it (make sure it is double sealed) because freezing reduces garlic flavor significantly.

 

If you can use dairy, for each cup gratin add a generous tablespoon of sour cream - this is a "trick" I learned decades ago from a chef friend.  It saved me having to re-do a vat of broccoli-cheddar soup.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Saving an "over-garlicked" dish?