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Flat Iron Steak

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Actually I plan to roast a chicken for dinner tomorrow, but thought that the flat iron steak discussion should be pulled out of that thread.  Here's one I picked up today at the local Kroger affiliate, packed by Tyson according to the label.  Will try the low and slow approach on this one:

 

 

 

It was the smallest one in the bin, at about a pound.  But wow, 7 bucks a pound for chuck?  I guess flat iron is following in the footsteps of other less desirable cuts that suffer from bursts of popularity.  It wasn't long ago a packer cut brisket could be had for about $1.50 a pound, last I looked it was about $4.  Sheesh.  Flank steak, tri tip, chicken wings - sigh.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #2 of 18

Was the meat flavor injected?????     Otherwise it looks as if your getting fat free piece of meat which could be good in a way or two.  READ YOUR LABEL to see if it's been flavor injected - with phosphates which aid in water retention.  Do you want to purchase water along with your meat????

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 

While I am generally suspicious of products from major corporations like Tyson, the label on this piece says nothing about "flavor enhanced", "moist and tender" etc. so I assume it has not been subjected to "deep marinating" as the industry likes to call it.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #4 of 18

I was thinking about this low/slow method.  Though I'm not sure I can get a hold of a flat iron steak, I do use this technique on an eye round now that I think about it.  I know I've even described the technique here and it works.  One of the things I like to do for parties is to use a cheap cut of meat as the centerpiece.  Let others put out their legs of lamb and prime rib roasts.  When you come to my house I'm going to serve you a pork butt, a lamb shoulder, or an eye round.  Surprisingly enough it's not because I'm cheap, I put all my money into organic fresh local produce, I'll travel to one market to buy the most delicious potatoes and head to the market across town for the city's best leeks.  With a piece like lamb shoulder or pork butt it's a piece of cake, just stick it in the oven covered for a few hours and you're golden.  But with eye round you have to do something special to it to make it into something otherwise it's a chewy mess.

 

So I saw a technique on America's Test Kitchen which was brilliant.  Using 4tbsp of salt I rub it all over the roast and then park it in the fridge for 18-24 hrs.  Then I rinse off the excess salt, pat it really dry.  Sear on all sides and then brush it with mustard and season with pepper, garlic, herbs etc.  Place in a low oven 325 for about half hour and then turn off the oven and let it sit in there for another half hour.  Rest it and slice it thin and it's delicious!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #5 of 18
While i have never braised a flat iron steak i have grilled it to use in fajitas. We have a grilled flatiron steak on our menu served with a chimichurri sauce and a tomato chipotle jam. It takes no time to grill, which is just one of the reasons we like to serve it.....it's an inexpensive cut to buy which the customers enjoy as well as it being tasty We sell A LOT of them. I cut a 10 oz steak and marinate it very briefly(more like a quick dip) in worcestershire, salt & pepper, grill and plate. At home i just rub with oil and s&p. the ones i get are pure beef, no additives with no more noticeable shrinkage than any other steak i grill....

joey
Edited by durangojo - 11/1/13 at 10:04am

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #6 of 18

I suppose you could low/slow a flat iron, but like Teres Major (don't know the consumer name for that muscle, if any exists yet) it is "intended" to be grilled like a rib eye, sirloin, or tenderloin.

post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
 

I suppose you could low/slow a flat iron, but like Teres Major (don't know the consumer name for that muscle, if any exists yet) it is "intended" to be grilled like a rib eye, sirloin, or tenderloin.


Being a former chiro, it appears that the Teres Major muscle would be part of what's called the Seven Bone Roast, which is actually a huge slice of "boston butt" from the beef.  The name Seven Bone comes from the fact that when the shoulder blade (scapula) is sliced, its cross section resembles a "7".  And nope, there aren't seven bones in that roast.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #8 of 18

whee.  glad you chimed in on this thread.  the only reference I could find was to the human body.... wondering how one would put that on the menu....grain fed homosapien teres major, rarely used, done with a . . .

post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dillbert View Post
 

whee.  glad you chimed in on this thread.  the only reference I could find was to the human body.... wondering how one would put that on the menu....grain fed homosapien teres major, rarely used, done with a . . .


...and some out there would put us down.   The following is THE anatomy book concerning muscles, their origins and insertions, and actions that I know of.  I used to know it backwards and forwards as will any scientifically orientated chiropractor.  And you can probably get a cheap copy at AbeBooks.com.  The Germans are the pre-eminent anatomists hands down.

 

Locomotor System by Platzer

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #10 of 18

The Teres Major muscle originates on the inferolatero part of the scapula and inserts on the anterior tubercle of the humerus (humeral head).  It's action is medial rotation of the humerus and adductor of same.  See here.  THIS is the kind of stuff we chiropractors study:  origins, insertions and actions in order to determine treatment applied to the musculoskeletal system...not meaning to hijack stuff.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #11 of 18

Are you folks cannibals?  I'm talking about a muscle on a cow:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoulder_tender

 

http://www.buedelmeatup.com/tag/teres-major-steak/

post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
 

Are you folks cannibals?  I'm talking about a muscle on a cow:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoulder_tender

 

http://www.buedelmeatup.com/tag/teres-major-steak/

Are we talkin' "shoulder meat" or meat from the lumbar (ribless) region "aka loin" from just above the pelvic region????  Big difference there.  And that teres major looks totally outrageous from Buedelmeatup.com.  Mmmmmmmm.    Teres major versus loin.  Learn your anatomy.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #13 of 18

Yes, shoulder -- chuck.  Who's talking about pelvic loins?  It does look yummy, doesn't it!

post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
 

Yes, shoulder -- chuck.  Who's talking about pelvic loins?  It does look yummy, doesn't it!

I wanted to avoid confusion.  Loins are from the lumbar region, in between the ribs and the pelvis.  :D

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #15 of 18
I passed by a butcher in the city and saw a flat iron. I didn't it because I already have a culinary plan for the next few days but I will keep it in mind for when I want to try this technique.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #16 of 18

I intensely dislike freezing meats.

 

I have two exceptions - because I have experienced no bad side effects of these cuts....

 

pork tenderloins - these I de-cryo, trim, de-silverskin, cut in half, wrap in h.d. alum foil

 

flat iron steaks - these come 'one in a cryo pkg' - which I freeze "as is"

 

the pork tenderloins are oft on sale - two for one, etc - so I'm apt to have 4-10 "halves" in the freezer time to time.

I always keep a / one flat iron frozen - only recently tripped over a good deal - so I stocked up on 3x.

(I have a computer "shopping list" program" which has the option to "keep" stuff on the list until manually deleted - so when we it the last, flat iron goes on the shopping list in "keep" status until I can stock up or get so desperate I buy one "full retail")

post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dillbert View Post
 

I intensely dislike freezing meats.

Me too. I decided a few years ago to completely stop freezing or using frozen meats. 

 

I have two exceptions: chicken bones for stock, and bacon that I dice before I freeze it so I always have some at hand. 

post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

Me too. I decided a few years ago to completely stop freezing or using frozen meats. 

 

I have two exceptions: chicken bones for stock, and bacon that I dice before I freeze it so I always have some at hand. 

 

I dislike freezing red meat, a lot!  My MIL is constantly serving us frozen beef and I always eat it in wonderment, it's impossible to comprehend how an entire cow can lack so much flavor on its own and then be served completely unseasoned.  It's curious.

 

I do freeze chicken breasts because I eat them so often.  And I freeze hot dogs and bacon all the time too.  

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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