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Making a perfect hard boiled egg

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Can someone here help with what I might be doing wrong when making hard boiled eggs?  I cover the eggs in cold water bring to a boil, simmer uncovered for 9 minutes, and then zap them in cold ice water.  They peel fine and the egg is cooked through but the outside isnt perfectly smooth.  Does it have something to do with the freshness of the egg or am I doing something wrong?  If anyone can help me out that would be great because I have to make a perfect hard boiled egg for part of my final this semster.

post #2 of 19

Do you have a picture of one of your finished eggs that you could post? It would make it a little easier to dispense advice if there was a visual starting point. I think I know what you mean by not perfectly smooth, but would like to be sure.

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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 

Yeah sure next time I make one i'll post a picture. I guess jagged would kind of be a good way to describe it if that helps any.

post #4 of 19

Do not salt the water. Add a bit of vinegar to the water. After the eggs are drained, roll them around in the pot to crack the shells. Peel them under running water to help loosen the shell. 

post #5 of 19

I'm having very reliable results steam cooking the eggs for 10'.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #6 of 19

I transfer mine to a cool pot, crack the shells and cool with cold tap water - a couple of changes if necessary.  They peel easily and I never get green yolks.  If I know I'm making something with hard cooked eggs I'll buy them a couple of weeks in advance. 

post #7 of 19

the chill shock - I'm an ice water fan as well - helps enormously.

I start them in boiling water, only because I find the timing is more consistent - but I doubt that has a major impact on the peeling.

 

that said and as Mike alluded, fresh eggs are known to be more difficult to peel.  so sayeth even the egg industry.

 

depending on the distribution chain, distances, etc - eggs in the carton could be as little as 2-3 "old"; not typical I'd say, but possible.

 

they'll keep for 30 days easy in the fridge - so I'd buy a batch and keep them a week.

post #8 of 19

Old eggs boil better... or at least they peel better.  Your eggs were probably a bit too fresh.

post #9 of 19

Are you starting with cold eggs or room temp?

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #10 of 19

Slightly older eggs peel better, do you know how to tell how fresh an egg is? Also as soon as your eggs are done, crack gently. Put them under cool running water and as soon as you can handle them comfortably, peel them under the running water.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefwriter View Post
 

Do not salt the water. Add a bit of vinegar to the water. After the eggs are drained, roll them around in the pot to crack the shells. Peel them under running water to help loosen the shell. 

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Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

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post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

Are you starting with cold eggs or room temp?

 

mjb.

I start with cold eggs from the fridge.

post #13 of 19

I should probably do a side by side test, but it seems to me that eggs that that are room temp when they go in the water seem to be easier to peel.

 

I did about a dozen a week or two ago, 10 peeled very easily, one not so easy, and was was just a pain, turned out quite a mess.  So I had to eat that one, rather than serve it to our guests as a deviled egg with crab.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 
This is what I was talking about with the egg not being perfectly smooth it's a little hard to see but hopefully this will give people a better idea of what I was talking about.
post #15 of 19

Old eggs? Air cavity? 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #16 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post
 

Old eggs? Air cavity? 

So would that mean the egg may just look like that due to age and not because of me doing something wrong?

post #17 of 19

Could be. It doesn't look so bad anyway.

Try steaming. It has some benefits: eggs lie horizontally; there's no dangerous simmering, which move the eggs; precise timing.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #18 of 19

Im thinking air cavity , thus there is nothing you can do about it. 

It in the eggs nature. 

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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post #19 of 19

. . . . I'm still trying to see what's wrong with this picture . . .

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