ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Food & Equipment Reviews › Cooking Knife Reviews › Would an electric Sharpener Ruin The knife?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Would an electric Sharpener Ruin The knife? - Page 2

post #31 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benuser View Post

Only solution would be to have the heat treatment repeated.

 

Generally no.

 

You have to first disassemble the knife to remove the handle, then any unevenness in the grind of the knife will cause the blade to twist, bend and warp.

 

The very fine edge and thick spine of the blade results in severe differential shrinkage of the metal during hardening and often cause the blade to spontaneously crack.

 

dcarch 

post #32 of 41

I say yes, sorry. if you learn how to use a steel you will have the best sharpener in the world, your hands!

post #33 of 41

I guess the next question would be what are the "preferred" methods of sharpening?

There are multiples kinds of stones,

there are honing tools,

And then I've seen leather straps too (forgot the name I saw, started with an 'S').


Thoughts?


Sorry to thread hi-jack, figured it would be good info for all!

post #34 of 41
Were any of you guys ever in the "Boy Scouts"?!? I remember learning how to sharpen knives. If you do it correctly ... good for you. You have a good working knife. If you do it wrong ... too bad. After a while you either get another knife or you stop playing with knives.

Electric sharpeners can ruin knives if you do it wrong. You know what ... stones, even very good stones ... can also ruin knives if you do it wrong.

Learn how to do things correctly and you don't ruin your equipment.



(duh)

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #35 of 41

Depends on the type of machine. If your talking the kind purchased in dept. stores  forget it. If the old fashioned grinding wheel like the guys in the trucks use, if you know how to do it.   OK.

CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by ED BUCHANAN View Post
 

Depends on the type of machine. If your talking the kind purchased in dept. stores  forget it. If the old fashioned grinding wheel like the guys in the trucks use, if you know how to do it.   OK.

 

Those machines use water as coolant.

 

dcarch

post #37 of 41

The electric sharpener probably uses a motor to turn a grinding wheel. Putting a knife on a wheel will burn the carbon out of it, making the edge last only a few cuts instead of a few weeks. You need to sharpen metals slowly to avoid burning the metal so the carbon is retained and the blade's hardness isn't affected. You can do this by using a hand sharpening method of some sort, OR you can get one of those grinders with a wheel that turns really slow and is dipped in water to keep the metal cool all the time. You will have to set the angles on the tool rest as closely as possible and have a steady hand to do it, but it can be done. These grinders are sold for grinding woodworking chisels and run around 100 bucks or so. Use a fine grit wheel turning in water for good results and a good tool rest that doesn't move to assure the angle doesn't change. The finer the wheel, the longer the edge will last if you take care of your knife .

post #38 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by pcrcrepaira View Post
 

The electric sharpener probably uses a motor to turn a grinding wheel. Putting a knife on a wheel will burn the carbon out of it, making the edge last only a few cuts instead of a few weeks.  .

 

Um, no. The carbon doesn't really burn out of it. You can mess with the temper certainly. But it's not really about using a motor alone. If you have good technique, a motorized tool will work fine. Keep the knife moving so it can't build up enough heat to mess with the temper, it works fine.  A skilled worker at a slack belt on a belt grinder can produce an amazing edge.  A buffing wheel with some Black Magic Compound will make it scary sharp. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #39 of 41

I would say yes but it just mostly depends on the person who's doing it. just my 2c

post #40 of 41

First I'd like to thank everyone that has contributed to this topic.  Previous to reading this thread I had used a Chef's Choice for sharpening my kitchen knives.  I know for a fact that I never got great results.  Between the guide magnets grabbing at the blade while drawing it through, the inconsistent speed (my fault), and variable pressure on the knife I generally ended up with a blade that stayed sharp for a few uses at most.

 

After reading all of this and some other resources online (such as http://www.jayfisher.com/Knife_Care.htm#What_about_powered_sharpeners_and_systems), I started looking for a way to easily sharpen with stones that didn't require the learning curve.  I stumbled on this (http://www.thetoolreport.com/top-rated-knife-sharpeners/) which actually discusses a good bit of what has been said here.  I settled on a Edge Pro Apex system and I must say I have been very happy with it.  Manual operation with stones and no heat. 

post #41 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by bottomofbachelo View Post

I settled on a Edge Pro Apex system and I must say I have been very happy with it.  Manual operation with stones and no heat. 

And removes much less metal
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cooking Knife Reviews
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Food & Equipment Reviews › Cooking Knife Reviews › Would an electric Sharpener Ruin The knife?