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Bangers and Mash

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

Dearest Brits, Irelandese, and yes, you too Aussies,

What exactly is the method to making bangers and mash?

I spent a few months in London quite a few years back and never indulged in the typical pub fare. I was a poor college student and I spent all my spare cash on beer and chips. Now I want to put bangers and mash on my pub menu, but I'm not quite sure what the gravy consists of. There's lots of videos to watch, and they all sound appropriate, but really... what is the standard sauce for bangers and mash?

 

I've got Irish bangers from a local butcher (pork, bread, black pepper) and they're pretty tasty yet neutral; good texture. But I'm stuck on the sauce/gravy. I mean, I can make a sauce for them with onions that will taste great, that's not a problem. But I'd like for a national to order it expecting the worst, but getting something close to home. Know what I mean? A bit of authenticity. Is there a standard? What would you expect if you ordered it in a pub? Does every pub have their own take on it?

 

FWIW, I'm cooking the sausages in advance. They will be browned in a pan and onion gravy will be added. Served with mashed Yukons and mushed peas. Sorry, but it's a ticket time issue; we can't cook them from raw in a pan. High volume, health department on our back.

post #2 of 24
Hey, I love bangers and mash and have made it many times before. My favorite gravy/sauce recipe you can find here: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/recipes/4223330/Onion-gravy-recipe.html
Really good.
Also, you could even try poaching the sausages beforehand, say the night before, and simply finish in the pan, which gives nice uniform cooking inside, but allows good color on the outside. See what works for you...

J
post #3 of 24
Best quality snorkers, pork only. Something like a Cumberland or Lincolnshire. No fancy flavours or chili type spicing. smile.gif

Cook sausages until well caramelised. Make wonderfully creamy, buttery mash.

I make an onion and carrot gravy. Good, thick, homemade beef stock, just-cooked sliced onions and carrots ( boiled but still with a little bite) added. If necessary, thicken with a little slaked cornflour.

Great dollop of mash on plate, top with three snorkers, smother in gravy. biggrin.gif
post #4 of 24

Haha, you said snorkers.  That's my new favorite word.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #5 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel View Post
 ...three snorkers...

See? I've already screwed it up by only serving two to a plate.

Also, I avoided their "English Bangers" because I thought they were too spicy/garlicky; like a brat or kielbasa.

It's on, and we did a handful of onions sauteed, splash of demi, splash of cooking liquid, reduced. I knew it was going to fly, but ...wow... everyone ordered it!

Got good responses too. Going to get some pork bones in and make a stock for gravy in the future.

Opinions are still appreciated.

It's a work in progress.

post #6 of 24

This thread is making me hungry - That's it. Now I just have to make bangers and mash with onion gravy!! The biggest problem will be to find bangers in L.A. I guess....

post #7 of 24
UK bangers are much less spicy than most European style sausages. Mostly they are flavoured with subtle herbs and spices like sage, mace, nutmeg, ground pepper. NOT chilis or paprika etc.

Bangers and mash are comfort foods,
Not 'in your face' flavours. wink.gif
Edited by Ishbel - 11/17/13 at 11:05am
post #8 of 24

Maybe I should just try a local English pub. There are a few around, and they're usually fun places... :)

post #9 of 24
Be careful, we have plenty of bland, rusk-filled fatty snorkers available to many of our own pubs here, never mind 'British'-style pubs in foreign climes! Quality of the bangers is key! biggrin.gif
post #10 of 24

I may have to try my hand at making some bangers.  From my understanding a bit of rusk ( a special type of breadcrumbs, basically ) is needed, but as it is no doubt cheaper than pork I am sure it is often used as filler, not flavor.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #11 of 24

I have them every March 17 (St Pats day) I love them.(Don't like Corned Beef)  And used to sell 100s of orders with carrot and pea puree, sauteed onionson top of mashed bangers on top of that then spinach one side carrot other  YUM YUM

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #12 of 24

Spent  4 years in the UK in the 50s, and I always thought the rusk was to soak the fat and thus you have flavor?  Not sure though. My wife was from Ipswich and we have tried to duplicate Lincolnshire sausage without much success with some recipes from the web.

post #13 of 24
The rusk is there as filler. All sausages need some.... Just not too much, or you end up with a 'bready', bland sausage.
post #14 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel View Post

Be careful, we have plenty of bland, rusk-filled fatty snorkers available to many of our own pubs here, never mind 'British'-style pubs in foreign climes! Quality of the bangers is key! biggrin.gif

Wow ok good to know. So far I've found a pub not too far from where I live... and apparently the serve deep fried bangers (pic of their bangers below). That reminds me of my early trips to the U.K. as a teenager, when we would eat at fish and chips shacks and order butter-fried burger patties and chips with vinegar, served in a piece of newspaper IIRC. Oh the memories. :crazy: 

 

post #15 of 24

Hahaha this is so funny Ishbel, as I read through the menus of those pubs, there are dishes where I can't understand a SINGLE word. 

 

Haggis, Champit Totties, & Bashed Neeps ..... huh? Say what? I would have never guessed that this was English language, even less that it described some kind of food. :eek: :lol:

post #16 of 24
That's because it's not Inglis, but Lallans, one of the Scots languages!

Neeps is turnips, aka rutabaga in various parts of the world, swede in England.. The orange ones, not the smaller, white ones.

The word is chappit, which means mashed in this context, one can also chappit on a door... ie knock. Bashed is mashed, too.

Totties is the weegie way of saying tatties, ie potatoes.

Battered sausage is standard chip shop fare. Blech!
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel View Post

That's because it's not Inglis, but Lallans, one of the Scots languages!

 

HAH. That would explain it. 

 

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ishbel View Post

Battered sausage is standard chip shop fare. Blech!
 

Hahaha ok, maybe I won't visit that one pub then... moving on. I've found some few sources to get english bangers, I'll try!! I'm sure my kids will love this meal. 

post #18 of 24
If you can get good quality pork snorkers, you'll find all kids love the meal!
post #19 of 24

Man... Deep fried sausages that looks very tasty but totally unhealthy. If only fried foods were not so bad for us. 

Thanks,

Nicko 
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
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post #20 of 24
Battered, chip shop sausages are deep fried, the bangers for mash are shallow fried. Not healthy, but slightly less naughty.

Toad in the hole porkers are just browned in a shallow frying pan and then transferred to an oven proof dish and Yorkshire pudding batter poured in and cooked until the pudding is risen, light and golden?

In fact, that's what we're having for dinner this evening, with a carrot and onion gravy. biggrin.gif
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel View Post

Toad in the hole porkers are just browned in a shallow frying pan and then transferred to an oven proof dish and Yorkshire pudding batter poured in and cooked until the pudding is risen, light and golden?

In fact, that's what we're having for dinner this evening, with a carrot and onion gravy. biggrin.gif

OOoooh that sounds delicious too. I tried my hand at yorkshire pudding a while ago and it was a huge success!

post #22 of 24
Try it, you won't be disappointed!
post #23 of 24

Now, I've heard that they're called "bangers" because they go "bang" when they burst.  Well, I've never heard a sausage go "bang".  (And please try, just try, to keep this discussion on topic.  :roll:)

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #24 of 24
That's the legend. The skin of Cheaper bangers would often split in the pan, but with typical British understatement, this became a bang, hence bangers. I don't believe a wordof it. biggrin.gif
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