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Fall = soup, What is your favorite recipe?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

My favorite is a delicious butternut squash soup with a touch of apple.  It is warming but the apple really brightens up the soup so it doesn't taste too squashy.

 

Butternut Squash Soup with Apple Cider Creme Fraiche

Servings: 4

Amount Ingredients

1 cup Apple cider, cooked down to 2 Tbs

1/2 cup Creme fraiche

1/2 cup Onion, small dice

1/2 cup Leek, small dice

1/4 cup Celery, small dice

1/4 cup Carrot, small dice

1 cup Granny Smith apples, large dice

1/2 cup Fuji apples, large dice

3 cups Butternut squash, large dice

1 qt Chicken stock

1 ea Lemon, juiced

2 ea Bay leaf, fresh

1/4 cup Heavy cream

4 Tbs Butter, unsalted

 

Method

1. In a medium stock pot, melt the butter and add the onion, leek, celery, and carrot to

the pot and sweat the vegetables until tender.

2. Add your apples and cook for 4 minutes allowing the apples to get soft.

3. Add your squash and cook for 2 minutes stirring constantly.

4. Cover the vegetables with stock and add your bay leaf.

5. Simmer soup for 30 minutes of until the squash is tender.

6. To finish the soup take out the bay leaf and blend soup with a blender or hand blender.

7. Stir in heavy cream and season with lemon juice, salt, and pepper to taste.

8. For the creme fraiche, mix the reduced apple cider with the creme fraiche and stir

until smooth. Top soup with desired amount.

A traditional fall favorite with a twist. This soup is garnished with a sweet and tangy

apple cider creme fraiche that will make those fall flavors pop in your mouth.

Bananas

 

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post #2 of 25

Look's wonderful, Robbie.  I love soup.  I recently had a beet soup that was beautifully made...My wife makes a delicious split pea and ham bone that I could eat every day of my life. 

post #3 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DevelopingTaste View Post
 

Look's wonderful, Robbie.  I love soup.  I recently had a beet soup that was beautifully made...My wife makes a delicious split pea and ham bone that I could eat every day of my life. 

Thank you.  Hmm....beet soup?  That sounds interesting, I do not think I can say that I have, had, seen, or made beet soup.  What was it like?  Oh, split pea and ham, that was my dad's all time favorite.  We just did the Campbells condensed thing, but it was still good.  I bet your wife's is delicious, I might have to go make some now, I kind of forgot about split pea soup.

 

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post #4 of 25

Oxtail soup. I love one loaded with lots of vegetables (tomato, carrot, onion, cabbage, celery) as well as a consomme.

post #5 of 25

Karen and I like this one:

 

http://wasatchfoodies.com/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=8

 

And this as well:

 

 

http://wasatchfoodies.com/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=38

 

 

I'll have to write up my sweet onion soup, which I like but she doesn't really care for it.

 

mjb.

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post #6 of 25

This time of the year, I like soups made from butternut or Hokkaido pumpkins. Ovenroast pumpkin wedges, a whole onion and a few whole large potatoes for one hour. Peel everything, cut in chunks, add to a cooking pot, cover with stock of your choice and let simmer for 20 minutes, then mix well. Incredible!

post #7 of 25

Baby tiger, I love oxtail. don't find it much in the supermarkets by me, but it's one of my favorite things to eat. A place I used to go to served the tastiest oxtail stew, and I used to go wild for it.

 

 

My fav soup right now is NE clam chowder. I can just eat bowls and bowls of it.

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post #8 of 25

This may sound odd, but an interesting new combo for me, is French Onion & Perogy Soup (w/ melted Swiss, & crusty bread).  I used Campbell's, but I'd like to make it from scratch next time.

 

http://www.pierogies.com/retail/recipes/recipe.aspx?id=105

post #9 of 25

Cauliflower soup.  

Cream of mushroom.

Leek and potato 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robbie Rensel View Post
 

Thank you.  Hmm....beet soup?  That sounds interesting, I do not think I can say that I have, had, seen, or made beet soup.  What was it like?  Oh, split pea and ham, that was my dad's all time favorite.  We just did the Campbells condensed thing, but it was still good.  I bet your wife's is delicious, I might have to go make some now, I kind of forgot about split pea soup.


The beet soup was delicious,  I hope our friend doesn't mind me posting his recipe........I'd asked for it after tasting:

 

'Spicy Borscht' (neon beet soup) 

 

Ingredients:

onion (not sweet) chopped

lb of beets

cooking pear or apple chopped

2 celery stalks, chopped

1/2 red bell pepper or 1 small one chopped

1/2 cup chopped mushrooms

2 Tbls butter

3 Tbls oil

8 cups vegetable stock

1 tsp cumin seeds (yum)

pinch dried thyme

1 bay leaf

2 Tbls lemon juice

salt/pepper to taste

cream and fresh dill to garnish

 

Cooking:

Preheat 350.  Place beets on baking sheet, drizzle with 1 tblesp oil and salt and pepper.  Cover with foil.  Bake for about an hour or till tender when pierced.  When beets cool to handle, peel and chop.  Wear gloves.  Place all chopped vegetables in a large sauce pan with butter and 2 tbls oil.  Add 3 tbls stock.  Cover and cook on med low for 15 min., swirl/shake pan occasionally.  Stir in cumin seeds, cook 1-2 min.  Add rest of stock, thyme, bay leaf, lemon juice and salt pepper.  Bring to boil, cover and simmer for 30 min.  Strain and reserve liquid.  Remove bay leaf.  Place strained vegetable mix in food processor or blender, mix until smooth and creamy.  Return processed vegetables and cooking liquid to pan and reheat.  check seasoning.  Serve warm or chilled.  Garnish with cream (I think that is sour cream he means?) and fresh dill.

 

 

It's spicy and yummy.  I, who hate beets, love this soup.  As for the split pea soup, my wife uses dried peas, chunks of carrots and onion, and ham bone, and that's all I know (she's out of town, so I can't ask).


Edited by DevelopingTaste - 11/16/13 at 7:25am
post #11 of 25

Aside from the usual chicken XD. 

I would have to say Tomatoe , Carrot ( i make a godly spices carrot soup ) , and Potato , i can eat a bowl of any of these soups. 

 

Spiced Cream of Carrot Soup 

 

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post #12 of 25

Carrot is one I've been wanting to try.  Another is one I saw Chef Ramsey doing once, a broccoli soup which looked yum.

post #13 of 25

In Petersen's "Splendid Soups" book there is a recipe for chicken tomatillo soup.  It is quite good, like a bowl of enchiladas.

 

mjb.

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post #14 of 25

Beef or bison vegetable barley soup. Lots of fall root veg, onions, garlic... whatever I have plenty of in the pantry from the garden.

post #15 of 25

Peanut butter,Pumpkin soup serve in a small pumpkin with creme fraiche . or Puree of Green Pea St. Germaine. or Chicken a la reine, Roasted Beets and potato, Goulash soup.

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Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #16 of 25

Chicken & Dumplings, Gumbo, Clam Chowder with the razor clams were digging right now.

post #17 of 25

Emeril's garlic soup. Google it; if you're a heavy-duty garlic freak like me, you will double the amount of garlic. 

 

Just don't breathe around anybody for about a week.

 

Mike   :bounce:

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post #18 of 25

I make a lot of soups, many are "creamless" cream soups that I thicken w/ potatoes and I use vegetable stock (my own - but boxed will do).  I don't see the point of adding chicken or beef stock to a vegetable soup.

 

Tonight I had a favorite - two different soups in the same bowl; a striking presentation.  (I'd send a picture if I could only figure out how).

 

Curried Carrot and Gingered Parsnip.  I pour them in the bowl at the same time so they stay on their own side.

 

Other favorites are:

 

Roasted Butternut Squash

Cream of Broccoli 

Potato Leek

Cream of Mushroom with Wild Rice - the last time, I was going to use some half and half but reached for the almond milk instead.  It was delicious.

post #19 of 25

I recently discovered a recipe for courgette soup which is delicious and does not contain cream!  and a pea, spinach and mint soup which is really good.  I have a decanter of chilli sherry on the sideboard, and a few drops added to any soup is fab! 

post #20 of 25

Very nice soups. This year I made a tomato soup  that carried these ingredients:

 

Tomato

Tomato puré

Onions

Garlic

Pepperoncino

Star anis

Bread

Chocolate

Glace de viande

Pepperoni jam

Butter

S&P

 

Here's a pick

 

 

It's  an excesive, winter volcanic soup. One bowl could feed a strong Sumo player for 2 days.

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post #21 of 25

Mulligatawny. I just made one at work, by all accounts it was rich, creamy, and wonderful. Perfect for this time of year. What I didn't tell them, unless they asked, was that it was vegan, gluten free, and a fairly healthy preparation. Shhh, don't tell...

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post #22 of 25

 

A few soups come to mind:

 

Bean and pasta soup

So cook the soaked beans with some smoked meat, meanwhile sauté chopped onions, celery and carrot in lard and when they're beginning to caramelize, add chopped tomatoes and sauté them, too. Now remove the meat and most of the beans, leaving some to puree and thus thicken the soup. When the left-in beans are pureed, return the meat, the rest of the beans with all the vegetables from the pan to the pot and cook together for some time. Finally, boil freshly made pasta (the dough is just flour and eggs) in the soup.

 

Borscht

I always eat borscht hot, never chilled. I make some beef broth with beef shank and discard the vegetables (except for carrot, which I slice and return to the pot). I cube the meat and then add sliced cabbage, beans, and chopped tomatoes, all of which I boil together until the beans are tender. At this point, it should be really thick, not at all like a soup; much thicker. Now you need to add about four or five medium beet that have been baked, peeled and shredded with about a litre of beet kvass (shred some beets, add water and salt and leave at a warm place to ferment, which takes anywhere from three to eight days). Finally, add generous amounts of chopped dill. Serve with sour cream. For a side dish, I like pirozhki (baked stuffed buns, I like cabbage-and-mushroom filling) and some kasha (e.g. I like to cook pearl barley with bacon, onions and mushrooms).

 

Mushroom soup

I sauté some root vegetables (onion, celery root, carrot, parsley root) in lard, add paprika and some crushed caraway, then tomatoes, then mushrooms (usually honey mushrooms), sauté them, add water, boil, then potatoes, dumplings and finally some parsley.

post #23 of 25

The smoked tomato soup I made for the tomato challenge was tasty.  Tonight ham and beans, but that is a stew and not really a soup.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #24 of 25
Broccoli and Stilton. Really rich and heartening ( is that a word?)

Note it doesn't warm up well though so cook fresh and eat
post #25 of 25

I like this  Autumn soup http://cookiteasy.net/recipe/autumn-soup-306183.html   The soup is made of ground beef but it can be also replaced by chicken. As for me, I prefer follow the recipe. Beef seems to me more satisfying.  In fall I want to eat more than usually:D

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