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Sharpening a slicing knife

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I just acquired this old Sabatier slicing knife at ebay and was wondering if either a stone is used for sharpening or should it be sent out to be professionally sharpened with a "professional setup" (whatever that is).

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #2 of 5
You're much better off doing it yourself. You won't have to worry about overheating by the use of powered equipment by some 'pros'.
French carbons sharpen very easily. Have a look at BDL's contributions about stones. IIRC he mentioned oil stones as well as a possible option with these blades. Have no experience with them, though. My experience is limited to Japanese waterstones and Arkansas, and both work great with soft carbon. That being said, if you've no other steel types to sharpen, the Japanese are somewhat an overkill, I guess.
In general I wouldn't look for an extremely refined edge as the scratch resistance of this steel is relatively low. No higher grit than J2000-3000, except for deburring perhaps. And with a slicer some prefer a much lower grit because of the resulting toothy edge, e.g. J1000 and than stropping on split leather -- or cardboard, denim, newspaper or whatever.
post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

Then I'll just whip out my soft arkansas/black surgical combination stone to do the job.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #4 of 5

The auction said it had just been "professionally" sharpened but the scratches look really coarse, 80-120 grit I'd guess, so it wasn't taken to any fine abrasives. Your Arkansas stones should get the rest of the way.

 

I'd be concerned about that "canyon" up near the spine.

 

I don't see carbon sabs often but every time I do understand the mystique of them.

 

Jim

post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KnifeSavers View Post
 

The auction said it had just been "professionally" sharpened but the scratches look really coarse, 80-120 grit I'd guess, so it wasn't taken to any fine abrasives. Your Arkansas stones should get the rest of the way.

 

I'd be concerned about that "canyon" up near the spine.

 

I don't see carbon sabs often but every time I do understand the mystique of them.

 

Jim


I appreciate your input, really.  I'm not concerned about the "canyon" although it appears that the blade was subject to severe rusting.  Still, it's quite useable and I don't forsee any weaking when it comes to my use: slicing bottom round for jerkey.  Following is the reply I received from the seller:

 

I don't know anything about sharpening knives... There was a piece of paper around the knife blade with a phone number on it. That's the Amish guy that cleans and sharpens all the knives that I sell.
regards,

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
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