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What Size of Butcher Block?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I want to purchase a standalone butcher block (with four legs) for my new kitchen, for daily chopping / slicing, and (less frequent) dough kneading / rolling. The quote I got for the Monarch butcher block made by MMB (Michigan Maple Block) is quite reasonable.

 

I have trouble deciding what size to get. Could you please help me out? The butcher block is available in three thicknesses: 12", 14", and 16". Their working height is all the same (34"). The sizes available in each thickness are as follows:

 

12" Thick:
18″ x 18″, 18″ x 24″, 24″ x 24″, 24″ x 30″, 30″ x 30″

 

14" Thick:
18″ x 24″, 20″ x 20″, 24″ x 24″, 24″ x 30″, 30″ x 30″

 

16" Thick:
18″ x 24″, 24″ x 24″, 24″ x 30″, 24″ x 36″, 30″ x 30″, 30″ x 36″, 30″ x 40″, 30″ x 60″

 

I "think" I have enough space for any of the size listed above, but I don't think I need to get the largest one available (30" x 60"). I am leaning towards the 16" thick one, 24" x 30" or 24" x 36", but don't know if it will look huge in real life, or if it will be totally an overkill for a household of two adults plus two potential kids.

 

I'd like to hear your opinion. Thank you very much!

 

16Monarch-350x350.jpg 

post #2 of 15

Nice choice I would do the same. It'll be very big though, a centerpiece in the kitchen. A 24x24 butcher block is still a good size to prep on especially if you have it close to a counter. The 24x36 would be luxurious to work on though.

post #3 of 15

They are all mighty sweet but the 16" thick blocks are the ones MMB has been making since like 1880. I'd really love to have room for one at home.

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #4 of 15

..another place to spend my $$$'s.....    Worthy.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #5 of 15

The general advice is to purchase the largest you can afford and have room for.  It will be a long term purchase and the last thing you want is to regret not buying a larger one in the future.

David The BoardSMITH
www.TheBoardSMITH.com
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David The BoardSMITH
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post #6 of 15

Reqires extensive cleanin and sanitizing after each use.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thank you for your response!

 

Now I am leaning towards 16" thick, 24" x 36", 30" x 30", 30" x 36", or 30" x 40". I will re-measure the kitchen and see exactly how large I could go. My initial thought was the same as The BoardSMITH's -- the larger, the better.

 

I also wonder if a square block is more attractive than a rectangular one. If so, my decision will be much easier (30" x 30" vs. 24" x 24").

 

RE: "Requires extensive cleaning and sanitizing after each use."

 

I do have a dedicated wooden cutting board for raw meat.

 

I kind of understand that the block won't be as easy to clean as a regular cutting board, as it cannot be moved into the sink. But I don't know exactly how much cleaning work will be involved.

 

I imagine that after each light use, wiping it with a damp, soapy cloth will be sufficient? Maybe wipe it again with half a lemon to get rid of odors (if any)?


Edited by ILoveCookie - 11/26/13 at 10:18am
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by ILoveCookie View Post
...I do have a dedicated wooden cutting board for raw meat.

 

...I imagine that after each light use, wiping it with a damp, soapy cloth will be sufficient? Maybe wipe it again with half a lemon to get rid of odors (if any)?

Rubbing my cutting board with a thick paste of baking soda seems to remove all odors.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #9 of 15

I use a mix of vinegar and water to clean and sanitize, warm water and a sponge when necessary. I've also known some people to spray the board with vinegar and water then heavily salt the surface with kosher salt. Oil regularly with mineral oil, and once in a while slather with bees wax. The beeswax makes all the difference.

post #10 of 15

Just ordered this edge grain block from the B'Smith.  I possess a whole block of beeswax along with a gallon of mineral oil.  Now I'm ready to rock and roll.


Edited by kokopuffs - 11/27/13 at 11:56am

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #11 of 15

 

That looks like an end grain block to me... but that would be the superior of the 2 in my opinion anyways. Cutting on end grain is a true delight especially with a very sharp knife the wood get softer as you use it and more impregnated with the mineral oil and beeswax. That's why I'd say oil it a lot at first then once its been broken in you can oil it less.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post
 

I possess a whole block of beeswax along with a gallon of mineral oil.

I don't think you get all that into a board this size.:)

post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by beastmasterflex View Post
 

 

That looks like an end grain block to me... but that would be the superior of the 2 in my opinion anyways. Cutting on end grain is a true delight especially with a very sharp knife the wood get softer as you use it and more impregnated with the mineral oil and beeswax. That's why I'd say oil it a lot at first then once its been broken in you can oil it less.

I don't think you get all that into a board this size.:)


...and yes, that's edged grain.  And yes, enough for several lifetimes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

To you a very happy THX!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!   :bounce::roll::bounce:

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #13 of 15

"I kind of understand that the block won't be as easy to clean as a regular cutting board, as it cannot be moved into the sink. But I don't know exactly how much cleaning work will be involved."

 

There's no more cleaning or maintenance involved than with any other end grain board. Sanitize after use and buy or make some board wax/butter to keep it maintained. As you already noted the only real difference is you can't put it in the sink which really isn't the best way to clean a wood board any how. ;)

 

 

"...and yes, that's edged grain"

 

Congrats on the now board! However that's end grain, not edge or "edged". End and edge grain are very different. Edge grain is less $$$ and looks much different.

 

For board maintenance you can make your own board wax/butter by melting either 1 part Bees wax or parafin into 8-10 parts mineral oil. I just store mine in a pint Ball canning jar. If you don't make board butter or wax you will have a heckuva time working the wax into the surface of the wood.

I have to force myself not to look at David's Walnut boards...Must ....resist...temptation!

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #14 of 15
Quote:

Originally Posted by DuckFat View Post

 

...For board maintenance you can make your own board wax/butter by melting either 1 part Bees wax or parafin into 8-10 parts mineral oil. I just store mine in a pint Ball canning jar. If you don't make board butter or wax you will have a heckuva time working the wax into the surface of the wood.

I have to force myself not to look at David's Walnut boards...Must ....resist...temptation!

 

Dave

 

That ratio you cite, is it by volume or by weight?  I assume volume!


Edited by kokopuffs - 11/30/13 at 5:26pm

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 

Last weekend, I went to a local restaurant supply store, and saw a 24" x 36" John Boos Gathering Block. It has a 4" thick top, with decorative square legs, and looks pretty. I didn't think it looks that big, but my husband thought it's huge!

So I still haven't decided on what size to get. 24x30, 24x36, 30x30, 30x36, or 30x40? :confused: Hope I don't sound like nuts, but I have trouble deciding if square looks better than rectangular!


Edited by ILoveCookie - 12/17/13 at 12:53pm
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