or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › How can I fix the macaroon batter?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How can I fix the macaroon batter?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

How can I fix the macaroon batter? (for when I make it next time)

 

I followed this recipe here:

http://www.annies-eats.com/2012/12/28/how-to-make-macarons-step-by-step/

I weighed out everything to match the recipe to the gram.

 

The main difference is my batter is thicker than on the link, and its not coming off the spatula in a smooth ribbon.  (I used a purple food coloring gel).

 

Here is when the came out of the oven ( a bit of a piping problem, but even the good ones aren't smooth and have bumps and peaks):

 

This is the finished product using the best of the shells.

 

Since you can't really add water to the merange, should I add in water when I mix the almond meal, powered sugar and 82g of egg whites?  If so any idea how much?

 

Any other ways to improve the consistancy of the batter.

 

TIA

post #2 of 9

Abe, I just read the recipe and saw that they did mention an important step in making macaroons; after piping the batter, you need to rest the raw macaroons for at least 15 minutes until they form kind of a very thin crust. Only then put them in the oven. Gently touch the rested piped macaroons with the tip of a finger after that resting period; they will no longer stick.

 

Also; use old eggs. Professional macaroon makers "age" their egg whites for a week before using them!

 

And... well indeed, your piping may be tweaked a tad more. Anyway, they should look much better after a resting period; the peaks will fall nicely into place.

And, every one will agree that macaroons are notoriously difficult to make.

 

A last addition; did you know that finished macaroons are at their best after a night... in the fridge? Only then they will have developed that light crunch and that slightly chewy inside that macaroons should have.

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the tips!  Didn't know that.

 

As far as makng the batter less thick, should I use less dry ingrediants or add a little water to the dry ingrediants before mixing in the merangue?

 

Also, should the eggs be at room tempurature before I whip them?

post #4 of 9

I addition to Chris's advice....

For the best meringue results (whether using for macaroons or to top a pie, royal icing ...you get the idea) start with room temp whites and use immaculately clean bowl and whisk.

Any fat at all (oops I broke the yolk..toss everything out and start over) will impede the process.

I wipe everything down with a bit of white vinegar and fresh paper towels.

From the example pix of the bowl of batter I am pretty sure your main problem is your folding technique.

Search youtube for some up close and personal tutorials there are many great examples  :)

 

mimi

 

Wouldn't hurt to search CT for a recipe posted by an active member.

There are lots.

Then when you have a glich just PM the OP for advice.

 

m.

 

Just noticed that your whisk has pink batter on it.

Either you added the color to the meringue or were whipping instead of folding but both are no-nos.

Any coloring should be added to the batter before the folding stage....

Follow your instructions and you will have better results.

 

m.


Edited by flipflopgirl - 11/24/13 at 7:23am
post #5 of 9

Following Chris´s and Mimi´s advice , make sure you mix very well the dry ingrediants ,it is key. 

Also agreed the problem may be the folding. 

I wouldn´t add water to the mix , you may risk getting to a point of it being too liquid. 

 

I like to think that macaroons arent easy ( because they aren´t ) it takes time ot get them perfect and make them perfect every single time. 

Macaroons have a higher fail risk , if i do say so myself. 

 

Also for food coloring i would suggest gel food coloring over liquid ( if you are using liquid ). 

 

Rotate the baking sheet have way through the cooking process so they all bake evenly. 

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

Reply

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

Reply
post #6 of 9

I use a similar technique - it's from Herme's Macaron book. He also divides the whites into two parts - some in the dry ingredients and then makes a meringue. Then there are just a few differences:  He doesn't mix the almond/sugar/whites prior to adding the meringue; he adds the color to the whites in the almond/sugar; he uses all the meringue. Keep mixing/beating the batter until it looks like lava flowing.  It always seems to take longer than I think it will and it also depends on how old the whites are - the longer they "age"  the more fluid they are (less elastic) and I notice it doesn't take as long to mix to get the "lava" stage. After piping, he raps the baking sheet once or twice to eliminate bubbles and then recommends drying for about 30 minutes (depending on the humidity of the day, it may be longer) or until the shells are no longer sticky.

post #7 of 9

Hi abefroman,

 

I started a thread on macarons sometime ago. It might shed a light on your problem. Here is the link...

 

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/74812/macaron-shell-recipe-italian-meringue-method#post_436960

 

Please feel free to contact me either here or my email joeyprats@gmail.com.

 

Warmest regards,

 

Joey

post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JCakes View Post
 

I use a similar technique - it's from Herme's Macaron book. He also divides the whites into two parts - some in the dry ingredients and then makes a meringue. Then there are just a few differences:  He doesn't mix the almond/sugar/whites prior to adding the meringue; he adds the color to the whites in the almond/sugar; he uses all the meringue. Keep mixing/beating the batter until it looks like lava flowing.  It always seems to take longer than I think it will and it also depends on how old the whites are - the longer they "age"  the more fluid they are (less elastic) and I notice it doesn't take as long to mix to get the "lava" stage. After piping, he raps the baking sheet once or twice to eliminate bubbles and then recommends drying for about 30 minutes (depending on the humidity of the day, it may be longer) or until the shells are no longer sticky.

Thanks for the tips!

 

Just to confirm, after I have stiff peaks I add in the almond, sugar, and addtional whites, and keep the mixer on until I get flowing lava  (which I'm assuming is less soft than soft peaks).  Does that sound right?

post #9 of 9

Following Herme's technique, once the meringue has cooled, it gets dumped out of the mixer bowl into the bowl with the almond/sugar/whites/color and then mixed by hand with a rubber spatula until it is the right consistency.  It's gets easier to mix as it comes together and knowing when to stop is probably the hardest part!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Pastries & Baking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › How can I fix the macaroon batter?