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special pumpkin pie

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I'm posting for help recreating a pumpkin pie recipe that has worked well for me.  I carried it around on a photcopied piece of paper, never made a second copy, silly me.  I seem to have lost it when I moved across town.  I don't see anything like it online (yet).

 

Here are the clues:

--> I think it came from a book called The Joy of Breads and Pastries (no longer in print)

--> It advises using fresh pumpkin, prepared by cutting in half, baking at 350 until it falls out of its skin, and putting through a ricer or food mill. It calls for 1.5 cups of the processed pulp.

--> I remember it calls for a little flour, maybe a tablespoon.

--> It calls for milk, not milk and cream like the online recipes.  I used 1% milk and everyone raved about the flavor.  But I don't remember how much milk to use.

 

It has some helpful hints, which I will share:

--> It advises not adding the eggs right away.  You mix all the other filling ingredients, then let it sit a few hours or overnight to let the pumpkin absorb the milk.  Then you scramble the eggs and mix them in just before you bake the pie.

--> Next suggestion is to fill the pie shell halfway and bake for 5 minutes, then fill it the rest of the way without removing from the oven, bake another 10 minutes, then reduce heat for the final baking period of 40 - 50 minutes.  This guards against curdling and separation. I think it started at 420 degrees and finished at 375 degrees. but I'm not sure.

--> To test for being done, instead of inserting a toothpick or knife (which can ruin the perfect surface), you jar the pie plate.  If the filling moves like gelatin dessert, not like soup, it's done.

 

So I'm hoping some custard pie expert out there, or someone who has a copy of the same recipe, can help me reconstruct it in time for Thanksgiving and Christmas.  Thank you for any help you can offer.

 

- Always Listening

post #2 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlwaysListening View Post
 

 

 

Here are the clues:

--> I think it came from a book called The Joy of Breads and Pastries (no longer in print)

 

... could the name of the cookbook be something else?  I tried to search that and I came up with nothing... or was it a community/church/family, etc cookbook?  Do you remember the author?  The year of publication?  this recipe sounds pretty standard-pumkin-pie-ish...  what else could you share?

post #3 of 14

I googled and found this http://lostrecipesfound.com/

Several other sites like it.

Let us know if you are successful as it seems that pumpkin pie from down and dirty scratch is making a comeback at some of the linen tablecloth places.

Guess the upper crust :lol: doesn't eat from cans.

 

m.

post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 

...  it seems that pumpkin pie from down and dirty scratch is making a comeback at some of the linen tablecloth places.

Guess the upper crust :lol: doesn't eat from cans.

 

m.

@flipflopgirl I made a pie with our Halloween pumpkin one year, it was just okay, but certainly NOT worth the effort it took

post #5 of 14

I don't know if the same applies to p'pie but I listened to a recipe on Georgia Public Broadcasting for sweet potato pie that calls for evaporated milk instead of either milk or cream.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 

@kaneohegirlinaz - The cookbook may well have a different title, I'm just going by what I can remember here.  I looked for it myself without success, that's why I'm saying it's out of print.  That and the fact that it was a long time ago I checked it out of the Library - ten years or more.  It was just a regular mass-market cookbook, I believe it had an author with a reputation.  I don't remember much more in the way of clues, my problem is I can't remember the list of ingredients.  I hoped maybe someone would know a similar recipe that might work the same way - using some flour and no cream, keeping the saturated fat content down.  It does seem pretty routine otherwise, but I don't have enough cooking background to know how much of everything would be in a "standard" recipe.

The book had another tip I've used - it says you should always let the pie dough mature for a few hours or overnight before rolling it out - to let the water pull the gluten out of the flour to make the dough stick together and not be made soggy by whatever filling you use.  It's a tip that's worked well for me, but when I related it to a young lady who had just completed a culinary course, she just shook her head and gave me a "you poor, deluded fool" look.

The book also said one should NOT make a pie out of a jack-o-lantern pumpkin.  Those bloated monsters are likely to be stringy and tasteless.  It says to use the little pumpkins that are sold specifically for eating.  Advice I've heard repeated elsewhere.  I know going from scratch is a lot of work, but I like the craftsmanship and the requests from the people I know for "your special, wonderful pumpkin pie" make it worthwhile for me.  And I'd rather use fresh ingredients than some glop of unknown provenance from a can.

post #7 of 14

When it comes time to learning how to make a crust with a flakey bottom, talk to me.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #8 of 14
FF... evaporated (Gma Van called it Pet milk no matter what brand was on the label ) milk is sort of a southern thing.
Any custard based pie as well as puddings , cream gravy, the best mashed potatos in the world as well as infant formula back in the day.
No well stocked pantry was without a can or three.
Sometimes full strength sometimes watered down depending on what it was being added to.
Not ever on cold cereal tho....eek.

mimi
post #9 of 14
Hey now AL...
I realize that everyone is entitled to their opinion and all , but pumpkins are a highly perishable seasonal veg and unless you don't mind importing from a different hemisphere canned is the only option
Loaded with high value nutrients.
Those leading the veg lifestyle have grown to depend on this tasty product all year 'round.
Plus it is the only "veg" my oldest grand will eat (besides french fries lol)
Just sayin

mimi
Edited by flipflopgirl - 11/28/13 at 2:24pm
post #10 of 14

We grow pumpkins in our garden. The big ones.

I peel, de-seed and cut them up and cook them down.

I place everything in my juicer. I throw away the juice and keep the pulp.

The pulp comes out of the machine very close to canned pumpkin pie filling, but I cook it down some more on the stove top.

The I use this just like I would the canned stuff.

post #11 of 14
So ross
You are saying that if reduced and juiced, the jack o'lantern variety is edible?
Obviously not if the peel has been breeched, but if I go down to the pumpkin patch run by a local church group and buy for pennies per pound, that all those wasted gourds? veg? fruit? can be salvaged?
That indeed is great news!

mimi
post #12 of 14

Adding allspice to the pumpkin filling will turn it a green color!

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 

FlipFlopGirl -

 

Pax! I don't want to start a quasi-religious argument.  If you want to use canned pumpkin, go ahead, I won't stop you.  Using it to make a home made pie still gives a higher quality product than a frozen or mass-produced product.  I would use canned pumpkin, if I had to, I just *prefer* to use fresh ... and I get rave reviews when I do.

 

That being said, pumpkin is not as perishable as you think ... keep them in a cool room with good ventilation, and as long as they don't get damp and hungry squirrels don't find them, they'll keep until next March.  And canned is not the ONLY other option ... you can also freeze processed pumpkin pulp, wrapped to protect from freezer burn, and it will be the same as fresh for a whole year.  This is better than the second cooking required for any canning, and the additives and harsh treatment of industrial production.  I've done this and enjoyed (almost) fresh pumpkin pie in July.  An authentic American dessert for Independence Day.

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlwaysListening View Post
 

FlipFlopGirl -

 

Pax! I don't want to start a quasi-religious argument.  If you want to use canned pumpkin, go ahead, I won't stop you.  Using it to make a home made pie still gives a higher quality product than a frozen or mass-produced product.  I would use canned pumpkin, if I had to, I just *prefer* to use fresh ... and I get rave reviews when I do.

 

That being said, pumpkin is not as perishable as you think ... keep them in a cool room with good ventilation, and as long as they don't get damp and hungry squirrels don't find them, they'll keep until next March.  And canned is not the ONLY other option ... you can also freeze processed pumpkin pulp, wrapped to protect from freezer burn, and it will be the same as fresh for a whole year.  This is better than the second cooking required for any canning, and the additives and harsh treatment of industrial production.  I've done this and enjoyed (almost) fresh pumpkin pie in July.  An authentic American dessert for Independence Day.

 

LOL!

Thanks for the permission!

Solid pack pumpkin (most brands, anyway) has always worked for me.

I do can and preserve lots of other produce, fresh picked that day, (and way more perishable than a few dozen little gourds nestled in hay in a closet somewhere).

Peaches, cherries, apples, green beans, lemons (both whole, salted, and juiced), tomatoes, jams and chutneys (can I add salted and smoked pork products?) just to name a few.....

So when we are into the second or third year of Armageddon stop by and enjoy a nice slice of pie...you can even choose the filling!

:beer:

 

mimi

 

* You have given me a great use for keeping a few whole pumpkins stashed....fresh squirrel meat ( if the little guy has passed the glow in the dark test) can be delicious if properly cleaned and prepared!

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