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Pork tenderloin in persillade with gratin of Jerusalem artichokes. Clafoutis with prunes for dessert.

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Saturday's dinner. The main was entirely improvised on the fly! Turned out as one of my best Saturday experiments. Clafoutis; divine dessert and so easy to make!

 

1. Pork tenderloin in persillade with Jerusalem artichokes

 

Pork tenderloin in persillade, gratin of Jerusalem artichoke, broccoli

 

The tenderloin; A "persillade" is more often done on lamb, but it went extremely well in this dish too. Brings extra taste and looks to the plate and it's simple to make.

- quickly sear the meat in a hot pan in oil/butter. Remove from the pan and let cool. Keep juices that come out to add to the sauce.

- cover the meat with a nice layer of Dijon mustard.

- make a mixture of stale bread, fresh parsley, s&p, optional a tiny bit of fresh garlic. Blitz into sort of a crumble.

- roll the tenderloin in this breadcrumb mixture. Tap gently.

- put in a hot oven, covered with aluminum foil for 8-10 minutes. Then remove foil and cook until done, in this case another 5 minutes.

(it's good to learn to feel by squeezing gently how far the meat is done)

- rest the meat for at least another 5 minutes; this will tenderize the meat nicely and will prevent the meat juices from flowing out when cutting the meat.

 

The Jerusalem artichokes; I kind of prefer the French name, topinambours, pronounce toh-pea-nahm-boor, with the emphasis on "boor". This is a variation I came up with on gratin Dauphinois.

- peel them, cut in thin slices and cook in salted water with a bit of white vinegar added until nearly done

- butter an oven dish and add half of the slices

- make a 50/50 cream/milk mixture with s&p and nutmeg added. Pour over the topinambours

- add the rest of the slices plus cream mixture until nicely covered and bake in a hot oven for 20-30 minutes or until the top starts to brown.

 

The broccoli; blanched in water then cooled asap in icewater. Reheated in butter, shallot, s&p, nutmeg.

 

The sauce;

- simmer portwine with a chopped shallot and an equal amount of red wine, a bit of sugar and a little red wine vinegar. Let it turn into almost nothing that looks like a syrup.

- add the same amount of veal stock as you had put wines in the sauce and let reduce.

- monter au beurre; simply add a not too large chunk of cold butter and swirl the pan, away from the heat, until dissolved. Keep warm on very low heat.

 

2. Clafoutis with prunes

 

Clafoutis with prunes

 

A classic clafoutis is made with fresh cherries but is also made with preserved ones and even a variation of fruits like plums or pears. Here I used preserved plums (halves) in a light syrup. A clafoutis has no pastry and is served slightly warm or cold.

- pour the syrup in a saucepan and let reduce until nicely thickened. Leave to cool.

- warm 200 ml cream with a vanillapod (scape the seeds out first). Leave to infuse, then add 120 ml of milk. Remove the vanillapod.

- mix 4 eggs, 50 g fine sugar, 70 g flour and 30 g of almond powder. Mix well and add the cream mixture.

- pour in a mold (I always use a glass one for clafoutis; no leakage guaranteed). Add the halved prunes; I add them one by one, starting from the edge, prunes cut side up.

- bake for 30-35 minutes or until done.

- sprinkle with icing sugar and serve with the reduced syrup


Edited by ChrisBelgium - 12/1/13 at 5:18am
post #2 of 6

Outstanding in many senses. The dishes, the recipes, the picks. Thanks.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thank you ordo!

post #4 of 6

I've been meaning to do a persillade.  Do you find that the parsley flavor is too strong?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 

Oh no, that persillade came out light and tasty Koukou, maybe all the more because I didn't put any garlic in it his time, which is very unusual for my doing since I love garlic. I even applied quite a thick layer of strong Dijon that did not overpower at all. And, I used curly parsley, the only one available.

post #6 of 6
Maybe that's why the parsley wasn't overpowering. Curly parsley tends to taste like nothing. I've never found a good use for it but this may be it. Adding good color and freshness but not overpowering.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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