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Sous Vide Home use - Page 3

post #61 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phaedrus View Post
 

Yeah, you don't need much fat at all.  Once you vacuum it in with the protein it envelops with just a few TBSP.

 

I have always found this difficult to understand.

 

When you draw a vacuum, the plastic makes a very complete contact with the meat. All air and liquid are squeezed away from the meat.

 

I don't know if any fat is enveloping the meat, except around the edges.

 

 

dcarch

post #62 of 88

The fat has nowhere to go except around the meat.  Where else can it go?

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #63 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phaedrus View Post
 

The fat has nowhere to go except around the meat.  Where else can it go?

By definition, when you draw a vacuum, there will be about 14 lbs per square inch of atmosphere pressure pressing down on the meat. This will serve to squeeze all the air bubble away as well as liquid from the surface of the meat. That's why you vacuum.

 

Take a look at the vacuumed bags posted, you will see the liquid only goes around the edges and not on top of the meat.

 

dcarch

post #64 of 88
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefAtRH View Post
 

Kuan,

 

I used a 30 gallon plastic trash can one time.  Had it on the patio during lunch service.  Explaining to people I was cooking for a catering job was fun.  I have the Poly Science circulator so it will handle a big job.

 

Bill,

 

Eye rounds are 5-7 pounds ish.  Texture starts to break down much past six hours.  I did them for 8 and they got mealy on the tongue.  Just not a pleasant mouth feel.  Might be different with tenderloin.  My thought on it would be that your goal is to cook entire roast a certain temp and that can be done in 6 (or less) hours.  For tenderloin your not so worried about breaking down to tenderize.  If you do it, please let me know.  I might be opening new place in next year and would probably kick up use of sous vide.  I read Momofuku (spelling?) and Chang talked about a high end steak house in Japan that he worked at where one guy puashed out 400ish  steaks a night using sous vide.

 

Steve

Steve, I'll be doing the Chateaubriand in Feb, I'll take some pic's. I have a tri-tip out now, for the Seahawks game tomarrow. 

post #65 of 88

Sounds good Bill.  Good luck with your game.  I don't watch football in January........Redskins fan ya know:(

post #66 of 88
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefAtRH View Post
 

Sounds good Bill.  Good luck with your game.  I don't watch football in January........Redskins fan ya know:(

 

I have a friend that has a place in Emmitsburg, Md, the place is called Chubby's BBQ, if your ever going by.......Redskins had a hard year, I'll say a prayer for next year..............take care............Bill

post #67 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcarch View Post
 

By definition, when you draw a vacuum, there will be about 14 lbs per square inch of atmosphere pressure pressing down on the meat. This will serve to squeeze all the air bubble away as well as liquid from the surface of the meat. That's why you vacuum.

 

Take a look at the vacuumed bags posted, you will see the liquid only goes around the edges and not on top of the meat.

 

dcarch

 

You only need it to lightly coat anyway.  Just as long as there is a film of fat it is fine.  It works, and it is really good.  Believe me.  Believe Thomas Keller.

post #68 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post
 

 

You only need it to lightly coat anyway.  Just as long as there is a film of fat it is fine.  It works, and it is really good.  Believe me.  Believe Thomas Keller.

Not a matter of believing or not believing. Just can't understand.

 

Next time when you open a bag, check the embossed pattern on the meat from the sous vide quilted bag. You can see how really tight the plastic is pressure pressed allover on the meat and try to understand how much liquid can actually get in between the plastic and the meat.

 

dcarch

post #69 of 88

I bet the film of fat is invisible to the naked eye.

post #70 of 88

Honestly I am not trying to be argumentative.

 

If a super thin film is effective in making food taste better, then 1/4 or less of a drop is all you need.

 

dcarch

post #71 of 88

I was actually thinking the same thing.  In fact I bagged them without fat at first, then I chickened out and rebagged them with fat.

post #72 of 88
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post
 

I was actually thinking the same thing.  In fact I bagged them without fat at first, then I chickened out and rebagged them with fat.

How would it be if the fat was a Compound Butter. Would this make the confit, not only cooking in the fat but, cooking in a seasoned fat. What I get out of the process is that everything is intensified in the Sous vide process. When I read about some of the mistakes people make,  they say they over seasoned. That would tell you a little goes a long way.......Bill

post #73 of 88

Maybe that's it.  The herbs season the fat.  For this batch I used a sprinkle of Herbs du Provence and whole thyme sprigs.  I made sure I got some of it in the bag.  I'm not sure it makes more of a difference, but what I can say is that it is really really good.  And when you pull the legs out of the bag and roast them, and the fat starts roasting the herbs, man it smells really really good.

 

I've been eating these one at at time with a salad and the day's bread, the other day with some risotto, and half a bottle of red wine.  I forget how good it is when you're actually sitting down and eating it rather than picking it off the bottom of a pan when I used to serve it to people.

post #74 of 88
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post
 

Maybe that's it.  The herbs season the fat.  For this batch I used a sprinkle of Herbs du Provence and whole thyme sprigs.  I made sure I got some of it in the bag.  I'm not sure it makes more of a difference, but what I can say is that it is really really good.  And when you pull the legs out of the bag and roast them, and the fat starts roasting the herbs, man it smells really really good.

 

I've been eating these one at at time with a salad and the day's bread, the other day with some risotto, and half a bottle of red wine.  I forget how good it is when you're actually sitting down and eating it rather than picking it off the bottom of a pan when I used to serve it to people.

Kuan, I would bet the dry heat roasting would bring out a wonderful aroma, along with a better finished product. Now you have me wanted to go out an buy some Duck. In all the restaurants I have worked, eating on shift was always on the run. The crispy parts of the Roast Prime rib, the leftover pieces of sauteed seafood out of the pan. Nothing like shrimp scampi right out of the pan. I told my front line cook one time, we should eat here sometime, the food is great. His answer was, I don't have time, my boss doesn't give me any time off. ..............Bill

post #75 of 88
Thread Starter 

I did a Sirloin tip roast, it turned out nice, good flavor and tender. I also made a Turkey breast for turkey sands for the football games this weekend.......I cooked two of these at 150 degrees  for 4 hrs........

 

post #76 of 88

How many pounds each on the Turkey, and bone in or no bone?

post #77 of 88

I don't use those bags with the strange checker pattern.  Mine is a chamber machine that uses regular bags.  Once the vacuum is released and full atmospheric pressure is returned you can see the oil pretty much surrounds the meat.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #78 of 88
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post
 

How many pounds each on the Turkey, and bone in or no bone?

I deboned a 8 lb  turkey breast, I figure between 3 to 3.5lbs each. My family didn't like the texture of the turkey, it was different from a turkey that was oven roasted. The breast was moist, I thought it was fine. 

post #79 of 88

So I was wondering about doing turkey too.  Is the texture different from alto-sham cooking?  We used to cook them to 170 then down to 140 for holding.

post #80 of 88
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefBillyB View Post
 

I deboned a 8 lb  turkey breast, I figure between 3 to 3.5lbs each. My family didn't like the texture of the turkey, it was different from a turkey that was oven roasted. The breast was moist, I thought it was fine. 

Hey Kuan, after thinking about cookng the whole turkey in dry heat. I can only think of how the breast was getting the worst of the deal. We have this thin layer of skin protecting the pure white breast meat. We are hitting the outside of the breast with 350 degree heat in order to cook the breast all the way through. We are also trying to cook the leg and thigh section in the same process. The alto-sham did a better job, look at the prime rib that comes out of that cooking process. I cooked the Turkey breastt150 for 4 hrs, as long as it's cooked over 3 hrs, it should make sure the breast is low-temperature pasteurized, depending on the size of the breast. I browned the fat skin sid

post #81 of 88

For that size cooking multiple circulators are great. in the kitchen now we have a grant circulator its accurate within 1 tenth of a degree and handles up to 50 liters also in the back we have a smaller sous vide supreme to handle other jobs so i can run at different temps at the same time. I can completely see doing that number of steaks very easy with a proper setup 

post #82 of 88
Thread Starter 

This is a Top Round ready for the Sous Vide water oven.  
  
DSCN4466_zps2a9d76c8.jpg 
  
Cooked at 132 degrees for 15 hrs 
  
 

 

 

  I reheated the roast in the Sous Vide at 131 degree for about an hour.  I browned the seasoned roast top round  in butter. Then served it with roasted red potatoes, roast beef slices with horseradish sauce. The meat was as tender as a Prime Rib, not bad for a tough piece of meat. 
  
DSCN4483_zps04015d67.jpg 
  
Notice, when cooking this roast and reheating it, it still has nice red meat...... 
  
DSCN4488_zpsf52cedef.jpg 
  
These are the roasted potatoes, I do use the stove oven every now and then..... 
  
DSCN4485_zps33e93f55.jpg

post #83 of 88

I just did a chunk of brisket flat sous vide for 80 hours at 130 F.  I then chilled it and cut about 16 oz off and took it with me to work for my dinner.  Just sliced it around 1/2" thick and let it come to room temp on a plate, then seared it on a hot broiler for a minute or two per side. O-M-F-G!  Really amazing stuff!

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #84 of 88

Billy what kind of racking system do you use?  Is it part of the system or did you figure something out yourself?  Also what kind of water bath do you guys use?  I just use a stock pot. Either 4 or 5 gallon.

post #85 of 88

If not already posted, the SVS Demi is on sale for $199. Ends today.

 

http://slickdeals.net/permadeal/113530/sousvide-supreme---sous-vide-supreme-demi-immersion-circulator?page=5#comments

 

 coupon code DEMIFOR199 = $199 + free shipping

post #86 of 88
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post
 

Billy what kind of racking system do you use?  Is it part of the system or did you figure something out yourself?  Also what kind of water bath do you guys use?  I just use a stock pot. Either 4 or 5 gallon.

I use the Sous Vide Demi, just the right size for home use. This is the rack it comes with.

 

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DSCN4232_zpsf17130b7.jpg

post #87 of 88

I have a Demi and a full sized.  Occasionally I'll have them both going at the same time.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #88 of 88
Thread Starter 

I harvested some Roosters that were bugging my hens to death a few months ago. There isn't a lot of breast meat on a young rooster but whats there is tender. The legs and thigh get tougher as the rooster gets older and runs around the pasture more. I made the rooster breast meat Sous Vide while using the carcass, leg, wing and thigh for stock and Chicken soup. The fat on a rooster is also thicker and more rubbery. I browned this in butter after having in Sous Vide for 1 1/2 hrs at 143 degrees. The breast meat was tender and juicy.....not a real good pic.

 

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