or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Food & Equipment Reviews › Cooking Knife Reviews › Knife for Xmas present for professional chef
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Knife for Xmas present for professional chef

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I am looking to buy a new knife for my boyfriend for Christmas. He's a sous chef, and currently has a 10" global. He likes it... But it's old, and I want to do something really nice for him. I have had lots of medical problems and he has been the most amazing man ever to me. smile.gif
Anyways, we talked a while ago and he talked about his old Shun santoku that he loved... But for the price, I'm just not sure it's the right way to go. I always loved my cheap victorianox knives or my nice henkels santoku when I cooked.

I'm looking to spend around $150 (I know it's not a lot... But I'm broke:))

Any advice would be helpful. Thank you!
post #2 of 14

I absolutely, positively love my Wusthof Classic Hollow Edge Santoku Knife, 7 inches.  It's a workhorse.  Outstanding customer service from Wusthof.  The handle cracked after several years, and the sent me a brand new knife.  And there are some great sales on now for this knife - under a $100, easily.  Good luck - he'll be one happy guy!

post #3 of 14
As a gift I think the Misonos are interesting because of their very nice Fit&Finish. Steel quality is much better than that of a Global or Shun. Excellent grinding. Not spectacular in any respect, but great well made performers.

http://japanesechefsknife.com/440Series.html#440Series

If you live in the US, korin.com has it's sales, -15% IIRC, and offers a free initial stone sharpening which is very useful.
post #4 of 14
The first thing to decide is if he would like a santoku or a gyuto. Considering he is a pro, I believe The gyuto is more useful and versatile.
Another thing is, do you know if he is confortable with Carbon steel or only stainless? Also, are you aiming to replace The global, so same size?

I agree with Benuser about The Misonos, But its star is Carbon. Although, The 440 is definetelly better than than The global.

An affordable option is The kagayaki carbonext. It is a semi stainless at a great price range and An Excelent knife, which is $128 for a 240mm and $144 for a 270mm.


However, the Tojiro DP is basically the same construction of Shun (VG10 clad with stainless), but with better heat treatment and much lower price ($100 for a 240mm and $130 for a 270mm).

Edited by dhmcardoso - 12/11/13 at 5:39am
post #5 of 14

You can get those Tojiro DP's dumb cheap on Amazon as well.

 

The 240mm is around $85.

 

If he already has a Global though, get him something unique and something with that wow factor, something aesthetically pleasing as well as functional. 

 

How about something like this?

 

Carbon 52100 Addict 240mm Gyuto

 

 

 

I've never used this knife, but it gets great reviews and it sure is something to look at. It's on my short list of expensive Gyuto's when I grab one in a few months.

 

Or how about something like this?

 

 

 

Itto-Ryu Hammered Gyuto 240 White #2

 

 

 

 

 

Carbon is obviously tougher to take care of, so maybe something like this?

 

Sakai Takayuki Damascus Wa-Nakiri 160mm

 

 

This one AEB-L steel, it's stainless. I know people seem to be divided on this type of steel though. But the Nakiri would be a cool idea as well and that knife is pretty stunning looks wise and also gets great reviews.

post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Kinogie View Post
 

 

 

 

 

Man, I like my knives with a bit of patina but that is just f'ing disgusting. 

post #7 of 14

:D Different strokes for different folks and the such. :lol: 

post #8 of 14

My suggestion would be to look at Japanese Knife Imports line of Gesshin Uraku knives if you only have about $150 to spend. They are probably the best you can get in that price range. I have one of the carbon pettys and it is a fantastic knife. I thought I wouldn't use it very much but I find myself reaching for it all the time at home. My wife was afraid of carbon at first when I explained it to her but now she uses that knife all the time too! Maybe even more than me.

 

Gesshin Uraku also has their original stainless knives that are also exquisite, I hear. A lot of people recommend the 240mm stainless gyuto for $155. 

 

Jon and Sara wrap their knives beautifully too, so it would make for a great gift as-is without even having to gift wrap it. They provide outstanding customer service if you have any questions.

 

I've bought a few knives from Chef Knives To Go and they also have quite a bit of stuff in that $150 price range that would make excellent gifts too. I have a few (much) cheaper carbon Tojiro's from them that I love. 

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Kinogie View Post
 

:D Different strokes for different folks and the such. :lol: 

I tell you what, if I was your chef, I'd make you scrub that off for fear of a health inspection. 

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Kinogie View Post
 

 

Sakai Takayuki Damascus Wa-Nakiri 160mm

 

 

This one AEB-L steel, it's stainless. I know people seem to be divided on this type of steel though. But the Nakiri would be a cool idea as well and that knife is pretty stunning looks wise and also gets great reviews.

I should comment on this one too. I have the western handled version of this knife in VG-10. It is widely speculated that the Wa handled version of this knife is not actually made from AEB-L and is actually VG-10. I don't particularly like my nakiri. It's an OK knife but I quickly learned there are much better knives out there for the money spent.

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vic Cardenas View Post
 

I tell you what, if I was your chef, I'd make you scrub that off for fear of a health inspection. 


LOL, it's a forced mustard patina. Yeah it's over the top, I like it though. I will admit I don't think I'd bring that in to service if I still worked in a kitchen, it would probably be my at home knife haha.

post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vic Cardenas View Post
 

I should comment on this one too. I have the western handled version of this knife in VG-10. It is widely speculated that the Wa handled version of this knife is not actually made from AEB-L and is actually VG-10. I don't particularly like my nakiri. It's an OK knife but I quickly learned there are much better knives out there for the money spent.


TBH, I use my chef knives for basically everything and when I need to do really precise narrow coring and presentation stuff a paring knife. Of course a bread knife as well. I also keep a real piece of crap heavy chef knife with a beat up, chipped up blade to hack away at bones, I should really get a nice boning knife haha.

 

I plan on getting a Nakiri soon cause I just like knives and want to try one, but I agree it's relatively unnecessary overall whether if you like it or not, although then it gets more and more subjective and task based.

post #13 of 14

I know. I've done that before with my first carbon knife. In fact I learned how to force a patina by watching Mark's video where he uses bubble wrap, which is what that is. After a while, my knife started to resemble the early stages of what that knife became... i.e. a life form. LOL ...I scrubbed it off and never did a mustard patina after that. I guess "advanced life form" patinas are not my thing. 

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vic Cardenas View Post
 

I know. I've done that before with my first carbon knife. In fact I learned how to force a patina by watching Mark's video where he uses bubble wrap, which is what that is. After a while, my knife started to resemble the early stages of what that knife became... i.e. a life form. LOL ...I scrubbed it off and never did a mustard patina after that. I guess "advanced life form" patinas are not my thing. 


I was looking for a gift for a friend last night and wound up back at that page staring in awe at that knife, as I do once every couple weeks haha and I thought to myself again, "When the patina is that crazy, how can I tell if it really is just a sick patina or some full on rust?"

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cooking Knife Reviews
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Food & Equipment Reviews › Cooking Knife Reviews › Knife for Xmas present for professional chef