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Copper Cleaning

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

From Amazon I just received to copper cleaning products:

 

  1. Copperbrill made by Mauviel;
  2. Wright's Copper Cream.

 

My questions are:

 

  1. Can one be used independently of the other
  2. Or, should one be used first followed by the other??

 

Is one a cleaner and the other a finishing polish???

 

EDIT: salt + vinegar doesn't work for me.  I'd prefer reading comments from anyone having direct experience with those two cleaners listed above.


Edited by kokopuffs - 12/10/13 at 6:28pm

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post #2 of 18

Should have told you before you spent your money...

 

Sprinkle some salt on the pot, then sprinkle on some vinegar or lemon juice (pickle brine will work too...) lightly scrub with a sponge, and it looks like brand new (for about 20 minutes...)

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post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 

Sorry but salt+ vinegar didn't work for me.

 

And when I received my Mauviel stock pot from the retinning place, it looked brand new and stayed that way for years until it was sold. 

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

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post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 

Copper Cleaning: the verdict is in.

Concerning:

 

  1. Copperbrill made by Mauviel;
  2. Wright's Copper Cream.

 

Think of Wrights as a very aggressive rubbing compound: an abrasive that'll leave some tine scratches in the finish but will remove some water spots.

 

Think of Copperbrill as a polishing compound: a compound much much finer that Wrights that'll clean up the majority of the tiny scratches left by Wrights.

 

Try Copperbrill first and then Wrights to see the difference each one makes.  But in reality use, if you must, Wrights first and then follow it up with Copperbrill.   Copperbrill alone requires much elbow grease but you'll be very pleased with the results of your efforts.   (Now I need another elbow, please!)

 

Somewhere I read a statement made in association with either the distrubutor, E. Dehillerin, who stocks Mauviel in Paris, France, that there is a copper cleaner that contains a certain special abrasive called Montmorillionite Clay that's found in the Jardin des Tuilieries, the courtyard of the Louvre Museum to name one local.  I wonder therefore if Copperbrill has it as one of its ingredients although it's not listed on their container.  (EDIT) And on the label of their container is listed Mauviel.


Edited by kokopuffs - 12/11/13 at 9:45am

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post #5 of 18

Polishing (any material) is essentially an abrasive process, especially if the need is to eradicate spots, stains or oxiidation.  If not an abrasive, they use acid for chemical "abrasion".  Wright's contains about 40% of a very mild abrasive according to its MSDS.  It is not really agressive unless used agressively.  Copperbrill does not appear to divulge its contents.  Flitz, and other non-abrasive shiners, use various acids.  For mirror shine a red rouge with appropriate buffing wheel should be used... like jewelers use.  For cookware, though, I don't see much value in polishing, but I know I'm not the only opinion onthe face of the earth.

post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
 

Polishing (any material) is essentially an abrasive process, especially if the need is to eradicate spots, stains or oxiidation.  Wright's contains about 40% of a very mild abrasive according to its MSDS.  It is not really agressive unless used agressively.  Copperbrill does not appear to divulge its contents.  For mirror shine perhaps Flitz or a red rouge with appropriate buffing wheel should be used.  For cookware, though, I don't see much value in polishing, but I know I'm not the only opinion onthe face of the earth.


Will have to do a side-by-side with Rouge, Flitz and Montmorillionite.   All finished by a microfiber sloth.  I wished I'd not have sold my 12 qt Mauviel stock pot 5 years after it had been refinished.  You'd have thought it was brand new even though it was retinned around 2002-3 by Rocky Mountain Retinning.

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-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #7 of 18

I find "shining the copper" to have three parts:

 

first and easiest is the surface 'discoloration' / oxidation

 

second more difficult is light staining from boil overs / inadvertent spoon, hot oil/fats oxidation, etc contact.

 

third, and a real bear, is burned on black stuff.

 

mine is stainless lined, so it'll not go for retin & courtesy polish.  I should probably instruct my will executor to send it out for "a plain old polishing" before passing it on to the next generation.....

 

pretty much any acid will take care of the first and some of the second.


BarKeeper's Friend is highly touted - oxalic acid is the active chemical ingredient with a very fine non-scratch 'abrasive'  BonAmi has a similar non-scratch ultra fine abrasive. 

 

it's effective against all three - but the burnt on stuff takes a lot of elbow grease.  BarKeeper's Friend leaves a matte finish - no noticeable scratches or rub-grain marks, but it does not make a mirror finish.

 

old kitchen trick:  ketchup.  smear it on, let it sit 1-2 hours, rinse off.
or, ala how I "discovered" the trick works.... made a meat&tomato sauce for pasta, pot in sink, filled with water.
later a smaller pot got set 'inside' the tomato sauce pot.
after dinner 'discovered' the smaller pot was bright and shiny.  well, the half that was in the acidified water....

 

lemon, pickle juice, vinegar - all acidic. all will make surface oxidation 'evaporate' leaving a bright copper color.
if you'd like to experiment, roll a lemon to loosen the juice, cut in half, rub the copper pot.... it's'mazing....

 

I use my copper&lids from stovetop to oven - the oven heat creates some interesting hues & shades. 

BarKeeper's Friend and a mild effort wiping makes the 'copper colored' again with very minimal effort.

one thing on BKF - keep a 'fresh' supply - I've learned cans left/lost under the sink for a year no longer have the same 'chemical attack' power....

post #8 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dillbert View Post

...

one thing on BKF - keep a 'fresh' supply - I've learned cans left/lost under the sink for a year no longer have the same 'chemical attack' power....

Very many good points and will consider using catsup/ketchup or even some tomato paste to enhance the shine.

But it appears to me that Bar F is rather abrasive and you're certain it won't leave scratches in the copper surface??

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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-T

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post #9 of 18

it does not do a "mirror finish" - but no, it doesn't scratch - been using it for 20 yrs +/-

 

works for me:

post #10 of 18

Always used Barkeepers friend with no issues.

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Nicko 
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post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dillbert View Post
 

it does not do a "mirror finish" - but no, it doesn't scratch - been using it for 20 yrs +/-

 

works for me:

So your items have lost their gloss from usage and not from using the Bar F.  Okay.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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-T

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post #12 of 18

they lost the "mirror shine finish" to something.

 

I use cotton "dish cloth" for cleaning.
but . . .
for years back we used Cascade powder dishwasher detergent (all the copper goes thru the dishwasher) and it was specifically noted to have a high silica content (read: sand) in 'reports' of 'things that ruin non-stick cookware' - we've since switched, but not because of the copper.  methinks that may be the primary culprit in "loss of mirror shine"

 

long story.... for near twenty years our kitchen was electric; finally got to pass&ignite some gas....

I bought one/two pieces of the top names / brands; found them disappointing; try a different brand . . . ; another yuck....

 

finally I sprunged for a Bourgeat fry pan and casserole.  it's said to "be the best" - so I tested the theory.  it met my expectations for fast, even and reactivity.  so I added pieces year by year.  Santa is a very kind fellow . . .

 

shaggy end to the long story - I use my copper because of how it cooks.
it does not 'hang'
it is not a 'show piece'

 

now and then when the spirit moves me I shine one/two pieces at a clip.  most often the casserole as it goes stove/oven to table moreso than a sauce pan.

post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dillbert View Post

...old kitchen trick:  ketchup.  smear it on, let it sit 1-2 hours, rinse off.

or, ala how I "discovered" the trick works.... made a meat&tomato sauce for pasta, pot in sink, filled with water.
later a smaller pot got set 'inside' the tomato sauce pot.
after dinner 'discovered' the smaller pot was bright and shiny.  well, the half that was in the acidified water....

 

lemon, pickle juice, vinegar - all acidic. all will make surface oxidation 'evaporate' leaving a bright copper color.
if you'd like to experiment, roll a lemon to loosen the juice, cut in half, rub the copper pot.... it's'mazing....

Today I dispensed some white/clear vinegar onto the lid of my copper brasier and let it set for about an hour.  It worked.  The vinegar removed the tarnish.  The next step will be the use of ketchup or catsup.  Can you recommend any particular brand??

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #14 of 18

>>brand

 

don't think it matters - it's the acid in the tomato product that is the 'active' ingredient, the 'paste' part acts to keep it moist and 'working'

post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dillbert View Post
 

>>brand

 

don't think it matters - it's the acid in the tomato product that is the 'active' ingredient, the 'paste' part acts to keep it moist and 'working'


Using the paste of ketchup/catsup allows it to be spread everywhere including the vertical walls without draining off.  With liquid vinegar, I'd need repeated applications of the stuff.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #16 of 18

Most of the places I worked at that had copper cookware made their own "paste" with vinegar, salt, and enough flour to hold it together....

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post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post
 

Most of the places I worked at that had copper cookware made their own "paste" with vinegar, salt, and enough flour to hold it together....


Hmmm, good comment.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #18 of 18

I have been using Wright's Copper Cream for years with very good results.  I have both some solid copper accessories and tin-lined canister set.  I have never noticed any tiny scratches or abrasions from that product.  It's a little hard to find in my area,  so I stock up whenever I see it on the shelf. 

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