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Three Fave Knife Brands - Page 2

post #31 of 48

Murray Carter

Masamoto KS

Konosuke

post #32 of 48
Mac is great. If you want stainless, great way to go.

My vg10 tojiro knives are prone to chipping. I've pretty much stopped using my sujihiki because of it.

Wusthof is good quality and if you don't sharpen too sharp of an edge onto it, the edge retention is good enough. If you put a sharp edge on them, they'll be dull with 30 mins of use on a plastic cutting board.

i havent gotten my itinomonn yet, car problems, shouldn't try to do the drive to the parents until i have it fixed. If i get it fixed next day off and drive down my next day off after that, id get it the 15th, and my parents are visiting the 16th or 17th. So i'll just get them to bring it up.
post #33 of 48

Wusthof Ikons will [for a German knife] take an impressively thin, steep and relatively keen edge thanks to an RC higher than the other Germans but, yes, really not practical to use in this state for anything but cutting in-hand/off-board.

 

 

Rick


Edited by Rick Alan - 10/5/15 at 2:32am
post #34 of 48

The knife I favor now is my Muteki by Carter.  It has a white carbon steel core blade laminated with stainless steel, 271mm in blade length with a wide blade height of 56mm, a thin spine of 1.4mm, and light in weight - 185grams.  The handle is made of Arizona hardwood.

 

The Muteki knives are made by Murray's apprentices under his supervision, so the price isn't shocking, and, unlike other high end knives that interest me, not always out of stock.  One of Murray's apprentices, whom I met and watched at work, Shamus, has studied under Murray for 11 years and is a dedicated bladesmith.

post #35 of 48
Masamoto KS
Aritsugu Tsukiji (weirdly cheap)
Masamoto KK
post #36 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisLehrer View Post

Masamoto KS
Aritsugu Tsukiji (weirdly cheap)
Masamoto KK

 

A quick search turned up nothing for Aritsugu Tsukiji.  Do you have a link?

post #37 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Alan View Post

A quick search turned up nothing for Aritsugu Tsukiji.  Do you have a link?

www.aritsugu.jp
post #38 of 48
Tamahagane, Mcusta Zanmai, konosuke.
post #39 of 48

Yeh I know about the site [that is in english] but found no knife by Aritsugu called Tsukiji, though there is a Masamoto by that name.

 

 

 

Rick

post #40 of 48
Global,Henckels,Chicago cutlry.
post #41 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Alan View Post

Yeh I know about the site [that is in english] but found no knife by Aritsugu called Tsukiji, though there is a Masamoto by that name.
Aritsugu Tsukiji is in Tsukiji market, Tokyo. Aritsugu Kyoto is in Nishiki market, Kyoto. They're not the same company. The Tsukiji stuff is good and oddly cheap. The Kyoto stuff is good--but nobody would call it cheap.
post #42 of 48

My current go-to knife is Shiro Kamo's 240 gyuto in R2. I think the value it presents for a knife in R2, and therefore stainless, is fantastic (especially as it is a damascus knife) . It is somewhat chippy (but I am a home cook without pro knife skills, so that is probably my problem....). I am starting to accumulate a few other knives but it remains the one I reach for first.

post #43 of 48
Shun blue steel
Kikuichi
post #44 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by OneS View Post
 

My current go-to knife is Shiro Kamo's 240 gyuto in R2.  It is somewhat chippy (but I am a home cook without pro knife skills, so that is probably my problem....).

 

Micro-bevel, do a forum search.

post #45 of 48

That's a good idea, Rick, had forgotten about them. I'll try that when it next needs sharpening - its been a bit off rotation since a couple of new knives have arrived.

post #46 of 48

All PM steels have poor edge stability.  You can sharpen them to as steep an angle as you want, but the edge will just chip right away on board contact without a 15deg/side microbevel.  Just a few light stropping strokes at the elevated angle to finish is all.  There will be little loss in performance because your edge is still very thin, and there will be a tremendous increase in edge retention.

 

I do have my Takamura at about 10deg/side, but that one never sees the board except the tip as I finish a slice, no whacking, and most of my cutting with it is actually done in hand.  No problem with micro-chipping there.

 

 

 

 

Rick

post #47 of 48

I also wonder if the chipping I was seeing might have been from the OOTB edge. I've always been uncomfortable about sharpening the OOTB edge before actually playing with it a bit first. Since I sharpened it I don't think I have seen as much (if any) chipping. But, as I said, I haven't used it as much recently due to novelty factor of my Christmas purchases. I'll definitely have a crack at the micro-bevel soon; have a new Kitayama 8000 which needs breaking in.

post #48 of 48

Yes, it will take a handful of sharpenings to get past the "factory edge" with your typical PM steel knife.

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