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Semifreddo: Why so many variations?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I'm looking into semifreddo recipes and I'm surprised to see why there are so many variations. Some used a cooked sabayon, others use it raw yolks, another one uses no egg yolks at all. Some use a Swiss meringue, others a French and another one an Italian. One recipe said you need a crust to prevent the frozen product from sticking to the plastic?

 

So I'm am not a pastry chef but my basic understanding is that semifreddo is a 3 piece puzzle: Whipped Cream, Meringue, and Custard. Correct?

 

What methods are you guys using? I'm thinking of going completely raw (French meringue, uncooked sabayon). How longs does a semifreddo hold in the freezer for?

post #2 of 5

I do whipped cream , Swiss Meringue , and cooked sabayon ( meringue and sabayon cooked through bain marie ). 

The rest is just flavor , lemon zest , extracts etc.....

 

Just the method im used too , plus i dont like messing around with raw eggs , some people have opinions about it so i just cook it. 

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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post #3 of 5

I make zabaglione in a bain marie. Then fold in whipped cream. I am not sure how long it will keep in the freezer made like this, but I do know that it will last a week no problem.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #4 of 5

I have never heard of an uncooked sabayon.  But I do think you find so many variations, because people keep experimenting and finding different ways to make frozen desserts that don't necessarily fit the same category of semifreddo, frozen mousse, souffle glace or the like.  I have been doing one that is a lot less airy than a semifreddo, but works great being molded into shapes and perfect texture out of the freezer - sweetened condensed milk and whipped cream, then I thicken the base, often a fruit puree, with guar gum to reduce ice crystals.  So easy, but the texture is very cream and stands up to intensely acidic flavors like yuzu and kalamansi.

post #5 of 5

I usually make  a parfait. which is a cooked sabayon. then add whipped cream and pour in molds, freeze.

the molds are lined with pvc foil used for cakes.

don't think it's a big difference from a semifreddo. which is semi-frozen. parfait is never as cold as normal icecream…. 

perfect for winter desserts..

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