or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › my artisan bread is too heavy and too dark
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

my artisan bread is too heavy and too dark

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hello,

 

I have tried so many time, the 1st 2 times it was to wet, so the dough would go over the baking pan and fall the sides, but the bread was nice and tasty (just looked funny). since than it was collapsing..so I found out that I was putting into a too warm place to rise and the yeast was over worked. so today I let rise at room temperature (about 70 F). the dough didn't collapse however it is is very dark and very heavy (not like the first couple times). just to clarify I have used a bread machine for a long time, for the last year I have used the machine only to make the dough and bake it in the oven. I am now doing this with no machine.

 

The recipe I have is from the Food channel from a chef Michael Smith, the red fife flower is actually local organic (Canadian) very nice flour.This recipe is a no knead bread.

 

2 cups of bread flour (white)

2 cups of red fife flour (or whole wheat)

1/2 cup of any multi grain mix (I didn' have any so added 1/4 cup of red fife and 1/4 cup of flax seeds)

1/2 tsp fo active dry yeast

1/ 1/2 tsp of salt (I used sea salt than switched to kosher salt)

2 1/4 cup of warm water

 

this is resting for 12 hours

 

knock the dough down (add a little flour) form to a ball and with a splash of veg oil coating the dough ball. put into a loaf pan and let it rise again for 2-3 hours, (now I didn't let it raise that long because it looked like it raise enough after about 1 1/2 hour.

 

Baked in oven at 425 for 45 minutes ( it was dark after 40 minutes so I took it out)

 

I know it takes time and practice, but I have put into the garbage can a few loaf by now and open to sugesstion :)

 

 

Thank you :)

 

naturegirl

post #2 of 11

It took me several years of experimentation to get it right.  First of all, SIMPLIFY your recipe.  5/6ths AP flour mixed with 1/6th WW, Rye or Bread flour.  Use a 50-60% hydration (get a scale that weighs up to 5 pounds accurately, MUCH SIMPLE THEREFORE TO SCALE YOUR RECIPE).  Non iodized salt since iodine interferes with the dough's chemistry.  And once you get this recipe down pat, then you can complicate the mixture.  Remember, Keep it simple.

 

Ingredients: here's what I use now:

 

  1. Flour 700g  (1/6th WW, Rye or Bread flour, 5/6th AP flour.   Keep the mixture of flours simple at this point.)
  2. Water 415g
  3. yeast <5g  (a good pinch or two of SAF RED INSTANT YEAST)
  4. salt (non-iodized) 15g
  5. diastatic malt 5g
  6. olive oil 30g

 

The method:

 

  1. Mix all dry ingredients.
  2. Heat water to 115F then add to mixture.  Mix once.
  3. Add olive oil.  Mix and knead for 15 sec. 
  4. Place the very shaggy dough in a deep bowl, cover with plastic wrap.
  5. Allow to set in a warm place for 15-18 hours.
  6. French fold once.
  7. Form into a tight ball and allow to rest for 20 minutes.
  8. Shape and proof for 30 - 45 minutes.
  9. Slash.
  10. Place into 475F oven for 30-40 minutes.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #3 of 11

And checkout this German website for proofing baskets aka brotforms.  Click on the one you like and a size/weight chart appears.  They can be ordered thru TMB Baking of SF.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thank you for your input Kokkopuffs, I am actually looking for more red fife flour than AP flour (not a fan). no offence but really looking for more grain. This red fife flour is about the only thing left that Monsanto didn't mess up with. Thats ok, I will keep at it ..may take awhile but that's ok :)

 

I just looke at your German website, yes I will try to find something like this. oh and just an fyi, the saf red instant yeast is not available around here we only have a Canadian bran, however I can get some better at my local natural food store.

post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by naturegirl View Post
 

Thank you for your input Kokkopuffs, I am actually looking for more red fife flour than AP flour (not a fan). no offence but really looking for more grain. This red fife flour is about the only thing left that Monsanto didn't mess up with. Thats ok, I will keep at it ..may take awhile but that's ok :)

Okay and understand.   But, keep the recipe very simple at the outset of your learning.  Keep with a lighter dough and when you've learned to bake and lift it enough,to get a good rise and OVEN SPRING, then go with a "heavier" recipe.  That's what I had to do to learn some of the dynamics of bread/dough making/baking.  Keep it light at this stage.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thank you :)

post #7 of 11

Red Fife sounds like a great flour to work with.  But again, 5 parts AP mixed with 1 part Red Fife.  KEEP IT SIMPLE as you're not ready for a "dark" loaf.  Keep it simple and lighter.


Edited by kokopuffs - 12/30/13 at 9:30am

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 

This is the history (part of it) of Red Fife

 

Red Fife is a cultivator of bread wheat that originated in Peterborough, Ontario in 1842. It is believed to have crossed several continents and the Atlantic before arriving in Canada, where it gained a foothold on the land of David Fife, for which it is named. Red Fife is the first wheat to be named in Canada and has great agricultural influence there today. In addition, many modern varieties of wheat are genetically attributable to this grain.

 

Red Fife wheat is thought to have originated in Turkey, after which it moved across the Black Sea to Ukraine where Mennonite farmers grew it.

post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by naturegirl View Post
 

This is the history (part of it) of Red Fife

 

Red Fife is a cultivator of bread wheat that originated in Peterborough, Ontario in 1842. It is believed to have crossed several continents and the Atlantic before arriving in Canada, where it gained a foothold on the land of David Fife, for which it is named. Red Fife is the first wheat to be named in Canada and has great agricultural influence there today. In addition, many modern varieties of wheat are genetically attributable to this grain.

 

Red Fife wheat is thought to have originated in Turkey, after which it moved across the Black Sea to Ukraine where Mennonite farmers grew it.

If it's a 'whole grain' flour like WW or Rye, loaves tend to be heavier.  What'd I recommend doing is increase the hydration because it loosens the gluten.  The resulting loaf may be 'flatter', more spread out, but with a more open crumb.

Here, checkout this thread at The Fresh Loaf forum.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #10 of 11

Hello!

When I make bread, I've noticed that it tends to flop or remain looking wet if I don't add enough flour. Maybe next time try adding just a little bit more flour until it has a drier texture. If it is too dark for you, try adding some more AP flour and working your way darker.

Hope this helps! :)

post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 

OK, thank you guys :)

 

I finally got it the way I like it, I used my same recipe only this time I have some mix whole grain(7), and I add on table spoon of wheat gluten, very nice and the best tasty bread ever :)

 

Now I will weight my ingredient and figure out my ratio and keep it accurate every time.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Pastries & Baking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › my artisan bread is too heavy and too dark