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Halving yeast

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I know this sounds ridiculous - but...My bread recipe calls for 1 package active dry yeast dissolved in 1/4 cup warm water.  If I halve the recipe, can I use 1/2 package and 1/8 cup water (by weighing the yeast)?  Thanks for any help.

post #2 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by NancyRob View Post
 

I know this sounds ridiculous - but...My bread recipe calls for 1 package active dry yeast dissolved in 1/4 cup warm water.  If I halve the recipe, can I use 1/2 package and 1/8 cup water (by weighing the yeast)?  Thanks for any help.


You can "eyeball" the yeast if you want.

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

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post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your help.  I guess my main concern is the amount of water used to dissolve the yeast.  I haven't made bread in years and really only wanted to make one loaf.

post #4 of 12

Yes, you certainly can do that.

 

There should be about 2.25 or 2.5 tsp or so of yeast in a packet.  I use 1 tsp of bulk dry yeast for a 1-loaf batch.

 

BTW, the new issue of Fine Cooking has a great article on yeast, if you are interested.


Edited by BrianShaw - 12/31/13 at 10:32am
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post...There should be about 2.25 or 2.5 tsp or so of yeast in a packet.  I use 1 tsp of bulk dry yeast for a 1-loaf batch.

 

BTW, the new issue of Fine Cooking has a great article on yeast, if you are interested.

For a better flavor, use less yeast for a S....L....O....W   rise.  For 700g and 415g water (approx 59% hydration) I added about 1/3 tsp SAF RED INSTANT YEAST.   And eighteen hours later the dough had fully risen.  It produced my best tasting loaf of bread ever because that extra time spent rising allowed the malt to breakdown more starch, producing more sugars that gave the loaf its great flavor.  

 

Dig it, 1/3 tsp yeast added to make a dough weighing approx  1.2kg!!!!!!!    :roll::bounce::eek:

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #6 of 12

Sure... slow rise is great... if only that answered the question.  Sometimes minimal yeast and slow rise is not the best or most correct answer.  :rolleyes:

post #7 of 12

@NancyRob: and at NancyRob alone,  the information I gave I though would be helpful in your breadbaking adventure.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post
 

@NancyRob: and at NancyRob alone,  the information I gave I though would be helpful in your breadbaking adventure.

This is true...  especially if doing lean dough bread baking.

post #9 of 12

delete delete delete


Edited by kokopuffs - 1/3/14 at 2:29pm

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by NancyRob View Post

Thanks for your help.  I guess my main concern is the amount of water used to dissolve the yeast.  I haven't made bread in years and really only wanted to make one loaf.


 

I use instant yeast now, which doesn't need to blooming in warm water. You add the yeast to the dry ingredients and go from there.

I don't think the amount of water used in blooming active dry yeast is that much of a concern. I would watch the total amount of moisture (water, milk, etc.). When I use AD yeast, I usually add the yeast to the total amount of water and let it bloom.

I agree with kokopuffs ... go for cold, slow rise for best flavor. Look at http://www.artisanbreadinfive.com/. You should be able to find information of slowing down the rate of fermentation.
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 

To all who advised through this adventure - THANKS!  FYI - I ended up just making 2 loaves.  GREAT flavor but I've had it rise more (when I baked 30+ years ago).  This was also my first attempt using my stand mixer (Sunbeam Mixmaster) with dough hooks.  Old Arthur-itis and neurapathy make it near impossible to mix the dough, although I was able to do a bit of final kneading.  The recipe was 50's vintage BH&G "Perfect White Bread".

 

Anyway, Thanks again for your support.

post #12 of 12

For the future...If you're using instant, or rapid rise, yeast you can certainly cut they yeast by 25% just to level the playing field. Instat/rapid rise yeast has about 25% more live yeast than active dry yeast. Beyond that you can further reduce, but may have to extend the first rise a bit. Another feature of Insta/rapid rise yeast is that it can be mixed in with the dry ingredients. It does not need to be proofed in water first. You may want to add the amount of water in which the yeast was to be proofed to the amount the recipe calls for. Hydration is an important component of bread baking and the recipe will be relying on the extra water.

 

Kyle

"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
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"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
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