or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Couveture?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

I have started making molded chocolates after a long long hiatus.

A friend asked me if I could make her some white chocolates. I looked at Chocosphere as I just bought some Callebaut bittersweet chocolate and some Guittard Soleil D'Or from them which arrived yesterday. (made some chocolates with the Guittard today). I looked at their Guittard white and they have white Couverture . One is 31% cacao and one is 35% cacao. I wasn't sure about couverture as I never used it before and so I orderedt the Callebaut white chocolate wafers instead (25.9% cacao) even though they were more expensive. Did I select right?  Is Couverture good for molded chocolates for future reference?

post #2 of 19

@SylviaM I am going to defer to our resident candy expert @Minas6907 they will probably have the best response.

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicko View Post
 

@SylviaM I am going to defer to our resident candy expert @Minas6907 they will probably have the best response.

Thanks Nicko

I had a "gut feeling" yesterday so I e-mailed chocosphere and asked if I could change my order from the Callebaut to the Guittard 35% cacao couverture. @Minas6907 has been very helpful to me in another thread, so hopefully she can steer me right in this one. I am not sure if Chocosphere will be able to change my order, hope they can as it is only showing as "processing" and they should have my e-mail before it is processed. the 25.9% cacao in the Callebaut seemed a little low.

post #4 of 19

When I first saw this thread I was thinking @foodpump would be able to give a more in depth answer then myself, he does much more chocolate work then I do, not to mention I'm sure hes used all the chocolates you mentioned. I have used Guittard, but I believe it was the only the semi sweet french vanilla, and since that, I've been using Callebaut. As for an answer to your question, you definitely would want to use couverture when molding chocolates. It certainly is much more pleasant to work with, and having the chocolate be more fluid makes for nice thin shells on your bonbons. As for the specific chocolates you mentioned, I cant comment on them directly, I havent used them and cant say I would know the little intricacies of each one, but I have a feeling any one you get will suite your needs. I'd say its more important to make sure your chocolate is in good temper before you fill your polycarbonate forms, and go ahead (if your able to of course) and make the fondant that I posted in the other thread, I'd just say forget about the purchased fondant, that is meant to cover cakes, they dont formulate that for a chocolate filling. Btw, I am a 'he.' :-) Happy bonbon making!

post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 

Thanks @Minas6907

I saved your recipe for fondant - where do I find the glucose? My scales weigh in grams too so I would have no problem getting the quantities correct. I don't have a stone slab though. How long will the fondant keep stored in the refrigerator as it seems it would make quite a lot.

 

Sorry about the mixup on your gender.

post #6 of 19

Couverture is French for "Covering", so it is more fluid than regular chocolate.  This is achieved by adding more cocoa butter to the chocolate.  Generally for dark couvertures 55%  cocoa content is the starting point.

 

I guess we should go all the way back to the cocoa bean.  After roasting and crushing, the resulting substance is referred to  as "Cocoa mass" or "Cocoa liquor" it is 100% pure cocoa bean, and as such, it naturally contains over 52% cocoa butter.  Even so, when warm it has the consistency of peanut butter.  So, for dark chocolates, you will find cocoa mass listed first on the ingredient list, followed by sugar, then cocoa butter, then vanilla and then soy lecethin. Each of the last two ingredients are less than 1/2 of one percent.  Obviously, the more sugar in there, the less cocoa content is in there.  So for a 55% dark couverture, you have about 44% sugar.

 

Milk couvertures have the addition of milk powder.  Generally about 1/3 cocoa mass, 1/3 milk powder, and 1/3 sugar.  Usually you'll find good quality milk couvertures with about 35% cocoa content at the starting point.

 

White couvertures only have cocoa butter, milk powder, and sugar.  The cocoa butter is the cocoa content even though it has no flavour.

 

So you will find that the 29% white will be less fluid then the 35%.  For molding shells and bon-bons, this does make a difference, as your shell will be thicker, but for dipping or ganaches, the 29% is pretty good.

 

May I suggest a book?  It is called "Chocolates and confections" by Peter Grewling, an instructor at the CIA (Culinary inst.america) this book will provide an enormous amount of information.  Your library should have it, and I have seen it at many bookstores, even the chains like Chapters and Indigo. Although it is pricey (aprox $80) no one says you can't have a good peek at it in the bookstore, but  try your library first.

 

Hope this helps

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 

Thanks @foodpump  - I am happy  I asked Chocosphere to change the chocolate I ordered to the couverture :) Hope they can do it.

I have the Peter Grewling book on my "wish list" at Amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_2_25?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=chocolate%20and%20confections%20grewling&sprefix=chocolate+and+confections%2Caps%2C512

I have the second one down, the 2009 edition on my wishlist - $26.55, do you know if there is much difference between the editions?

My husband went to the library for me a couple of weeks ago and they only had two books on candy making and neither had molded chocolate.

I am mostly housebound so my husband does the shopping for me - which is why I buy online a lot!

post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 

Ok - I found glucose http://www.bakerscandc.com/glucose-5-tub.html

It says it is thick corn syrup, so wouldn't Karo syrup work the same???

post #9 of 19

Yes, I substitute corn syrup (Karo) for glucose constantly.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post
 

Yes, I substitute corn syrup (Karo) for glucose constantly.

Thanks :) @Minas6907 recipe calls for 200g glucose, how would that convert to a liquid measure for the Karo?

post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by SylviaM View Post

Thanks @foodpump
  - I am happy  I asked Chocosphere to change the chocolate I ordered to the couverture smile.gif Hope they can do it.
I have the Peter Grewling book on my "wish list" at Amazon.
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_2_25?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=chocolate%20and%20confections%20grewling&sprefix=chocolate+and+confections%2Caps%2C512
I have the second one down, the 2009 edition on my wishlist - $26.55, do you know if there is much difference between the editions?
My husband went to the library for me a couple of weeks ago and they only had two books on candy making and neither had molded chocolate.
I am mostly housebound so my husband does the shopping for me - which is why I buy online a lot!

Overall the difference in the new edition may not interest you too much. There's a more in depth discussion on chocolate panning, more recipes added to each section, and a new chapter specifically on american style candy bars. I had the older book, and go the new edition when it came out, just cause I live the subject so much, but you may not find it as useful. Also, by rhe same author, check out Chocolates amd Confections At Home, it covers the same subject, but many aspects are much more simplified and tailored to the home cook. You may like that book, check it out, but for an in depth reading about confectionery, the '09 edition of Chocolates and Confections is fine.
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by SylviaM View Post

Thanks smile.gif@Minas6907
 recipe calls for 200g glucose, how would that convert to a liquid measure for the Karo?

You would still weigh out 200g of corn syrup...does that answer your question? I'm not sure if I entirely understood it correctly.
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minas6907 View Post


You would still weigh out 200g of corn syrup...does that answer your question? I'm not sure if I entirely understood it correctly.

Sorry didn't phrase correctly. (Not always good at explaining what I need to know :( ) As the syrup is a liquid I thought it would be easier to measure out in liquid form. My husband though said 200g is same as 200 mls.  But maybe I should just put an empty container on the scales and set the scale to 0 and then pour in the syrup until it weighs 200g to be on the safe side - like I said to my husband 200 mls of other liquid may not weigh the same as 200mls of syrup as syrup is "heavy"

post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minas6907 View Post


Overall the difference in the new edition may not interest you too much. There's a more in depth discussion on chocolate panning, more recipes added to each section, and a new chapter specifically on american style candy bars. I had the older book, and go the new edition when it came out, just cause I live the subject so much, but you may not find it as useful. Also, by rhe same author, check out Chocolates amd Confections At Home, it covers the same subject, but many aspects are much more simplified and tailored to the home cook. You may like that book, check it out, but for an in depth reading about confectionery, the '09 edition of Chocolates and Confections is fine.

Many, many thanks @Minas6907  I will get the 09 edition I have on my wish list.

post #15 of 19

FWIW:

  • Light Corn Syrup - 1 cup = 341 grams or 200 grams = 0.5865 cups = 4 3/4 fluid ounces = 8 3/8 Tbsp (approx)
  • Dark Corn Syrup - 1 cup = 328 grams or 200 grams = 0.6097 cups = 4 7/8 fluid ounces = 8 1/2 Tbsp (approx)
  • HFCS - 1 cup = 310 grams or 200 grams = 0.6452 cups = 5 1/8 ounces = 10 1/16 Tbsp (approx)
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #16 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post
 

FWIW:

  • Light Corn Syrup - 1 cup = 341 grams or 200 grams = 0.5865 cups = 4 3/4 fluid ounces = 8 3/8 Tbsp (approx)
  • Dark Corn Syrup - 1 cup = 328 grams or 200 grams = 0.6097 cups = 4 7/8 fluid ounces = 8 1/2 Tbsp (approx)
  • HFCS - 1 cup = 310 grams or 200 grams = 0.6452 cups = 5 1/8 ounces = 10 1/16 Tbsp (approx)

Thank you so much @PeteMcCracken

post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by SylviaM View Post

Sorry didn't phrase correctly. (Not always good at explaining what I need to know frown.gif ) As the syrup is a liquid I thought it would be easier to measure out in liquid form. My husband though said 200g is same as 200 mls.  But maybe I should just put an empty container on the scales and set the scale to 0 and then pour in the syrup until it weighs 200g to be on the safe side - like I said to my husband 200 mls of other liquid may not weigh the same as 200mls of syrup as syrup is "heavy"

I really would recommend that you weigh the liquid. When boiling sugar, it really is best to weigh everything, even water, you'll see in the book. For the fondant recipe, weigh 200g of corn syrup.
post #18 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minas6907 View Post


I really would recommend that you weigh the liquid. When boiling sugar, it really is best to weigh everything, even water, you'll see in the book. For the fondant recipe, weigh 200g of corn syrup.

I will definitely weigh it @Minas6907

post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minas6907 View Post


Overall the difference in the new edition may not interest you too much. There's a more in depth discussion on chocolate panning, more recipes added to each section, and a new chapter specifically on american style candy bars. I had the older book, and go the new edition when it came out, just cause I live the subject so much, but you may not find it as useful. Also, by rhe same author, check out Chocolates amd Confections At Home, it covers the same subject, but many aspects are much more simplified and tailored to the home cook. You may like that book, check it out, but for an in depth reading about confectionery, the '09 edition of Chocolates and Confections is fine.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SylviaM View Post
 

Many, many thanks @Minas6907  I will get the 09 edition I have on my wish list.

Update: @Minas6907 - I got the book (Chocolates and Confections - At Home with the Culinary Institute of America) and I love it. I have already made two of the recipes from it. There are lots more I want to try - the Chocolate Cherry Cordials look really good.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Pastries & Baking