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Are there skill gaps in catering?

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 

Hi

I would like to ask anyone who is reading this if that can help with this question. It is for some research I am doing it comes in a couple of parts it would be a great help if I could find out anyone opinion

 

1. In your opinion is there a clear career progression for chefs?

2. What level is the most common for chef to leave the industry?

 

skills gap as a significant gap between an organization’s current capabilities and the skills it needs to achieve its goals.

 

example of some skill

 

Process and project management skills

Sales skills

Technical/IT/systems skills

Communication/interpersonal skills

Customer service skills

Managerial/supervisory skills

Profession- or industry-specific skills

Basic skills (the traditional building blocks of business-level

competencies that are most commonly associated with elementary

language arts and mathematics)

 

3. Do you think that there is a common skill head chefs are unable to do

 

4. Is the biggest gap in skill in head chefs? Sous-chef? Chef de partie? Or Commis chef? The gap skill can be anything from knife skill, time management budgeting marketing, people management and communication skill.

 

post #2 of 3

 In your opinion is there a clear career progression for chefs?

 

Yes and No.  People interested in the culinary arts who are in the industry are doing just that.

When one enters the industry, they start out on the lowest rung and work their way up.

Chefs are managers and boss's already so, I fail to understand where you are going with this. Chef's always are trying to progess.

 

 

What level is the most common for chef to leave the industry?

 

Again.....as a Chef we are already in the the job category of manager.

At this point whatever the venue, either that Chef has worked for so many years AS a Chef, and then perhaps moves up to Food and Beverage Manager, but other than that I believe that those who are Chefs for a career end up retiring as a former Chefs.

 

3. Do you think that there is a common skill head chefs are unable to do?"

 

There IS no Chef anywhere that can do it all. And to that end, since Chefs are managers, they have people with them can have those skills sets that they themselves are lacking in.

 

One common skill huh?

 

 

4. Is the biggest gap in skill in head chefs? Sous-chef? Chef de partie? Or Commis chef? The gap skill can be anything from knife skill, time management budgeting marketing, people management and communication skill.

 

Skill is independent of title. For some Chefs, their biggest gap in skill IS their Sous, their Chef de Partie, and Commis Chefs.

That skill gap can be all that you have mentioned and more. As an executive Chef he places a lot of responsibility on his crew. The Chef instructs these people as to what he wants. If these people lack the skill set, it would be up to the Chef to help and instruct.

 

post #3 of 3

1. In your opinion is there a clear career progression for chefs?

 

I think you're better starting out in restaurants to learn sense of urgency. After learning the basics of the industry some choose to focus on a more specific type of organization, catering, hotels, large high volume, small local, personal chef, etc.

 

2. What level is the most common for chef to leave the industry?

When they become a food rep.

3. Do you think that there is a common skill head chefs are unable to do

Dishes!!

4. Is the biggest gap in skill in head chefs? Sous-chef? Chef de partie? Or Commis chef? The gap skill can be anything from knife skill, time management budgeting marketing, people management and communication skill.

Making the leap to head chef is the hardest I think, if that's what you mean. It's mostly the level of stress that a lot of people can't handle. Every other position you mentioned still has someone above that is ultimately responsible. Kind of like the captain of a ship, it goes down everyone else gets out, the head chef goes down with the ship, and if he does get off he's like that guy that crashed the cruise ship a while back.

 

 

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