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Can spoilt cheese on surface still be used?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi, 

 

I did some research saying that soft cheese will last up to 6 months in freezer.However,On the other hand,I had stored it in chiller before doing the research and it's now form mold on the surface. I have cut off the surface and throw them away. Can I still use the remaining ? 

 

Thank you.

post #2 of 12

According to restaurant and health standards in your country? Probably not safe. According to how many hundreds of times I have cut off a piece of mold from a soft cheese rind in my fridge and ate the remaining? Probably safe. Use your best judgement. If you are serving it to other people other than yourself, then definitely do not use it. Better yourself getting ill than making others ill.

 

Edit: Also, I have no idea why anyone would ever freeze cheese. I have never heard of people doing that.

Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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post #3 of 12

If the cheese has visible mold on the outside, it probably has veins of mold running through it as well. Pitch it.

post #4 of 12

I have always seen the mold being cut off and the rest being consumed, unless the cheese started to smell like ammoniac, that smell was the end of the cheese. In case you dought, do the wise thing and dump it.

 

Also makes me think of a long time ago when I saw people eat a very stinky cheese from the French Lille area that had maggots running through the cheese!

post #5 of 12

I've frozen wedges of brie before when I've bought several at a good price and it's been fine when I've eaten it. Harder cheeses turn grainy when you freeze them.

 

As for the mold, I've cut little bits of surface mold off of harder cheeses like cheddar in the past, but with softer cheeses, the mold flavor seems to permeate the entire wedge much more completely, I think.

post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisBelgium View Post
 

I have always seen the mold being cut off and the rest being consumed, unless the cheese started to smell like ammoniac, that smell was the end of the cheese. In case you dought, do the wise thing and dump it.

 

Also makes me think of a long time ago when I saw people eat a very stinky cheese from the French Lille area that had maggots running through the cheese!

 

Novelty aside of casu marzu, it was very tasty to me every time I ate it. It was "aired" out after it was cut open for about an hour to let the ammonia smell go away. I just pushed aside the fly larvae and ate it as I would any cheese. It just tastes like amazing goat cheese mixed with a VERY fragrant Roquefort. Lovely.

Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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post #7 of 12

Lucas, you're such a dare devil! Those crawling creatures are a bit too much for me, even though there's a 100% chance that at least the meat is fresh, hahaha.

post #8 of 12

Our health code dictates that hard cheeses with mold on the rind can be eaten, but you have to cut an inch of cheese from every side. Soft cheeses with mold should be tossed. An instructor I studied with compared mold to a flower. The part you see on the outside of the food is the bud, and if there's a bud, there's a stem and roots. If there's mold on the outside, it's everywhere throughout the food. 

post #9 of 12

As usual in food, its all a matter of degrees. All of us in the business sit round discussing these things, always

voicing the noblest of actions....and safest, "if in doubt, toss it", "better me than a client", etc. But in the end, it's all

judgement call, and when youre staring at a 25 dollar hunk of cheese sporting colorful surface mold something

possesses us NOT to dump it. Also, its a fact that we have all eaten much common mold in our lifetimes, and

though we avoid it if we KNOW about it, if we cant see it and it doesn't affect taste, then even though we may

logically know it's there, we consume it.....and we serve it.

 

As to removing it, well molds are alive and the more you leave behind the faster it re-multiplies. I therefore, make

ONE  pass with a sharp, clean cheese grater across the surface. If that doesn't get it all, I make another pass,

**AFTER** I've washed and dried  the grater from the first pass. If you don't clean it, it just forces more mold

fragments down into the cheese.

post #10 of 12

Cheese is moldy milk.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #11 of 12

Friend when I was just out of high school worked for Kraft cheese making the stuff that goes in the cheese and cracker packs. It starts with bulk cheese in 55 gallon drums. One night he loosed the band on a barrel and it literally exploded out the top blowing moldy cheese all over. They dumped it in the batch anyway. He came out to the party we were having after he got off work and we made him shower outside with a garden hose he stunk so bad...

post #12 of 12

On  a hard cheese just cut off the  ''spoilt'' part. In a soft cheese check carefully as in most cases you can't use.

CHEFED
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