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Professional Grade Cutting Boards make John Boos cry

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

http://www.glassrootscompany.com/butcherblocks.html

 

I don't see any reviews, but sure looks great.  I ordered mine, so in a week I'll get back to you guys. 

post #2 of 5

The first two look great.  I 'd pass on the third, the "professional" model though. When you have a block comprised of 144 individual smaller blocks with only glue and no mechanical joinery (ie dovetail joints) holding it together, and the thing sits in a pool of water it will crack, especially when made with different species (maple, walnut) as each wood will react differently to water.

DAMHIKT.....

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

Good thing I ordered the 2nd one! I haven't seen a cutting board with dovetails but that sounds like $ to me.  Maybe if they wrapped the "professional one" with solid wood? Biscuit joints? Anyhow, all I have is a john boos board  as a gift and after 2 years its cracking. this seemed like a better replacement. 

Keep it sharp!

post #4 of 5

1.75 inches thick for professional? No way! 

 

4 inches would be better.

 

 

dcarch

post #5 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by SharpChef View Post
 

Good thing I ordered the 2nd one! I haven't seen a cutting board with dovetails but that sounds like $ to me.  Maybe if they wrapped the "professional one" with solid wood? Biscuit joints? Anyhow, all I have is a john boos board  as a gift and after 2 years its cracking. this seemed like a better replacement. 

Keep it sharp!

 

Yeah... I "inherited" a massive 24 x 30 butcher's BLOCK, (that sits on 24" high legs) which was originally 18" thick. When I got it, it was hollowed out so badly I had to chop off almost 7" from the top to get it level again.  All the strips of wood (end grain surface) are dovetailed together, and there are 3/8" redi-rods (all-thread) spaced every 12" as extra precaution.

 

You can't wrap a strip of wood or even a band of s/s around a block made up of tiny individual end grain blocks.  Wood moves according to season, kiln dried wood moves, 200 yr "reclaimed" old Doug.Fir moves, wood moves, period.  If you wrap a band around the block, the wood will move according to humidity and if constrained by the band it will either crack or swell up, making a "hump" in the middle.

 

After 30-odd years working in all kinds of pro kitchens and about 15 yrs as a hobby woodworker, when it comes to wood cutting boards I can only suggest this:

 

Keep the wood block for show only, carving a prime rib on buffets, for example.  When done, scrape it clean with a woodworker's card scraper, sanitize it with sanitizer, and oil it periodically with mineral oil. If the board ever gets wet, really soaked, or is standing in a puddle of water for more than an hour, the odds of it splitting or cracking are very high--regardless of the quality or price of the board.  Wood moves, glue doesn't, and this means the splits always occur very near to  the glue line. 

 

For daily prep, get a nylon board, use it, abuse it, toss it in the d/washer, when it gets scarred run it through a woodworker's thickness planer, and abuse it some more.  They are cheap, easily obtainable, easily sanitized, require very little TLC, and you don't cry when you finally toss it in the dumpster.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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