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NYC Pay Rate

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

So, Ive been tossing around the idea of moving to New York within the next year.  Problem is, I don't know if I'll be making what I need in order to compensate for the change in cost of living.  So I'm wondering what I can expect to make in NYC?  I have about 6 years of fine dining experience and 4 years at corporate chains.

post #2 of 24

Starting rate of pay for non-union work would be in the range of 11-16/hr depending on where you land. 

post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 

Wow, thats pretty horrible for New York, I dont know how anyone can survive off that.

post #4 of 24
It's really not THAT bad. I live in Seattle and the pay rates/cost of living is the same as the more affordable neighborhoods in NYC and I manage well enough.
post #5 of 24
I started a little higher than that when I started working in nyc. But I live in CT so I make the commute.
post #6 of 24

Moving from LA 7 years ago I thought I'd get a higher pay rate because it is so expensive to live in NYC.  Not the case.  I made 11 an hour and eventually became sous, but even that salary wasn't a lot.  Thing about NYC is you go for the experience, not to make a living.  surviving on 12 or 13 bucks an hour is totally possible.  You just have to do it right.

post #7 of 24
Thread Starter 
Experience is definitely a plus, but im 27, so making a living definitely plays in the mix. Its hard to justify making the same as what I do now or less with a 50-60% increase in living expenses
post #8 of 24
Maybe consider a different city. NYC can't be the only learning hub... Chicago, Portland, Seattle, so many options
post #9 of 24
Don't come to Seattle to learn... it's almost as expensive as NYC (although you can find reasonable rent Just outside the city) but more importantly; There aren't many good restaurants at all. Our food scene is extremely overrated by outsiders. I'd say Portland is far superior yet still quite a ways behind NYC, Chicago & San Fransisco/Napa Valley.
post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeepsouthNYC View Post

Starting rate of pay for non-union work would be in the range of 11-16/hr depending on where you land. 
So what would a high end union hotel pay for someone with 4 -5 years experience?
post #11 of 24
Well in canada it's probably 17-21 / hr depending skill set to start plus benefit
post #12 of 24

Austin, TX has an explosive food scene and the cost of living is not too bad only problem is you do need a car to get around. 

post #13 of 24
I live in Connecticut and work in NYC. Take a train everyday.

So, you do not need to live in midtown Manhattan or the upper west side to work in NYC.
post #14 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef Torrie View Post

I live in Connecticut and work in NYC. Take a train everyday.

So, you do not need to live in midtown Manhattan or the upper west side to work in NYC.

 

What's the commute time like? Do the trains run all night long? How much does it cost to ride the train? What part of Connecticut are you in and what is the cost of living like there? This is intriguing to me as I'm planning on moving to NYC in the next few months. Might be an option worth looking into.

post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by veronporter View Post
 

 

What's the commute time like? Do the trains run all night long? How much does it cost to ride the train? What part of Connecticut are you in and what is the cost of living like there? This is intriguing to me as I'm planning on moving to NYC in the next few months. Might be an option worth looking into.


I actually just moved here 4 days ago. I'm 23 years old currently a overnight bread baker at Whole Foods, and my goal and passion is to cook. I live in Woodside Queens which is about a 20 minute train ride into Manhattan. Real easy commute. Also, the trains run all night, and you can get anywhere real fast. Trains run all the time. Now Woodside is a pretty toned down version of NYC, but you wont find apartments this large and cheap anywhere else. Me and my friend have a 2 bedroom, full bath and kitchen for 1400 a month. Heat and hot water included. 

Of course it is still expensive, but we make it work. I really can't say I have any formal experience in a kitchen, which puts me so far behind that I am afraid to even introduce myself to chefs. Now I do think I have a pretty good groundwork and knife skills. I cook daily, I read and watch shows and take in as much knowledge as possible. Once I get more situated though, I am just going to pop into a bunch of restaurants in Manhattan, preferably french cuisine. Not to flip this and make this about me, but any advice on how to approach chefs would be appreciated.

And if you have any other questions feel free to ask. Since I am in the situation where you may soon be in if you move here.

post #16 of 24
I'm right on the outskirts of Greenwich, in Fairfield county. Its a Richy rich town with a lot of investors and wall street guys living here. I just had another baby girl so we just moved into a 3br apt and pay 1650 month heat and hot water included. My last place was a 2br for 1200month. I'm sure if you look you could find a 1br or studio for around 1000. Just gotta plan ahead and keep your eyes open. Its a 55 minute train ride. Just perfect for me to suck down a large coffee, check my emails and skim thru the paper on my into work.
post #17 of 24
Thread Starter 
Good point, I didn't think about living on the outskirts. Anybody have any info on the Denver food scene?
post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by William Kuch View Post

Good point, I didn't think about living on the outskirts. Anybody have any info on the Denver food scene?


Peculiar herbs? :bounce:

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #19 of 24
Thread Starter 
Just wondering if they have anything cool going on out there besides cooking with herb?
post #20 of 24

We've got some pretty good restaurants.  Cholon is a favorite, Tag Raw Bar has some good stuff (oysters with shiso pico de gallo?), and Rioja is supposed to be really good.  Jennifer Jasinski got like 3rd or 4th on the last Top Chef: Masters I think.  Then there's the ethnic food scene; you can't throw a rock here without hitting a taqueria or pho joint.  Big Ethiopian community too.

post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingSicko View Post
 


I actually just moved here 4 days ago. I'm 23 years old currently a overnight bread baker at Whole Foods, and my goal and passion is to cook. I live in Woodside Queens which is about a 20 minute train ride into Manhattan. Real easy commute. Also, the trains run all night, and you can get anywhere real fast. Trains run all the time. Now Woodside is a pretty toned down version of NYC, but you wont find apartments this large and cheap anywhere else. Me and my friend have a 2 bedroom, full bath and kitchen for 1400 a month. Heat and hot water included. 

Of course it is still expensive, but we make it work. I really can't say I have any formal experience in a kitchen, which puts me so far behind that I am afraid to even introduce myself to chefs. Now I do think I have a pretty good groundwork and knife skills. I cook daily, I read and watch shows and take in as much knowledge as possible. Once I get more situated though, I am just going to pop into a bunch of restaurants in Manhattan, preferably french cuisine. Not to flip this and make this about me, but any advice on how to approach chefs would be appreciated.

And if you have any other questions feel free to ask. Since I am in the situation where you may soon be in if you move here.


I used to live near Woodside, and it's good to know the rents are still somewhat affordable. I use to pay 1150, no roomates. I thought surely the rents in that area would've gone up to 2k a month at least, with the way brooklyn and queens have changed in the past 10 years.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #22 of 24

Orlando is pretty amazing, can't beat the weather.  I used to work at Disney's Grand Floridian home of Victoria and Albert's (5 Diamond)  The Grand Floridian has like 4 multiple restaurants I started in the cafe (Basic dining room) turning out NY strips, prime ribs, and some genuinely nice dishes..  Everything else there was a step to Victoria and Albert's.. I never stuck around long enough, I was young and didn't know what I really wanted to do.  But Disney World started me out at like $13 an Hr back in 2005 when I was only just starting culinary school (plus a slew of park passes and deals)

Disney has a boat load of HIGH END restaurants, most of their hotel property's have  an amazing restaurant or two associated with it.   As do some of the parks Epcot has some impressive restaurants in it. 

 

DownTown Orlando is also full of amazing restaurants check yelp in the $$$$ price range.

 

Cost of living in Orlando is very reasonable, and getting hired into a hotel is also incredibly easy.. But I now hate hotels..  I also worked at the Ritz Carlton Grande Lakes when I lived in Orlando and they have Norman's which is one of Norman Van Akens restaurants. It is pretty impressive and pretty elite, but they also have a handful of other amazing restaurants Primo and the Vineyard Grill I think the hiring is seperate from that of the Ritz Carlton (owned by Marriott), but their are alot of big names in Orlando and their are also alot of just High quality restaurants. 

post #23 of 24

It's been a long time since I worked for Disney but little has changed with the fact that Orlando is a good spot to start out as a Chef. There's plenty of quality work, decent pay and a reasonable cost of living. Traffic is heavy and you will need transportation. Plenty to do and only an hour or so from the Ocean.

If you do interview at WDW I'd suggest avoiding Epcot. It's far more European in structure than the Hotels, MK, etc. When I left the average employee in the MK had 18 years with the Company.

Epcot- 6 months. There's a lot of turn over and exchange students etc in Epcot even though there are some very good restaurants there.

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #24 of 24
Thread Starter 
I'm actually from Tampa, and lived in Orlando a while back in 05-06. If I were to ever go back, I'd probably go back to Tampa. They have a pretty big food scene going on, but I'd prefer being somewhere new and different. As far as working at "elite" restaurants, I'm not particularly concerned with that. I'll be 28 very shortly, and I can't afford to take a huge pay cut just to say I worked for some prestigious chef. My current job seems to want to pay pretty well and I haven't even been there a year, so I'm going to stick it out for a bit
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