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Escoffier Online International Culinary Academy

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

I came across this when i was searching for online culinary courses. It seems legit and all, but the only thing to me that is fishy is that they don't accept fafsa, pell grant, or stafford loans. How is an unemployed 20 year old going to pay for that certificate? I looked into the actually brick and mortor schools but they too far away for me to go anyways. Anyone know about this school or even graduated from it? Anyone know of any way i could pay for that schooling? I don't have a credit card and no my parents can't pay either because they refuse to pay for my culinary career because it's not a real job to them. So if anyone can help me out that would be much appreciated. Thanks all. 

post #2 of 29

I don't know anything about this program you looked at, but the only online culinary degrees I've seen are Bachelor's degrees for Culinary Management, building on the Associate's degree already earned in a traditional school. I can't imagine going to culinary school exclusively online - how do you learn anything without in-person demonstrations or hands-on experience with a well-trained chef nearby? Again, I don't know anything about this one and I could be wrong about what kind of program it is, so keep that in mind.

 

If you can't afford to pay for this kind of culinary education, don't. Many people can't. Get your start at a restaurant and work your way up - there are plenty of success stories of that nature on this forum. Culinary school is not the only way to succeed in this industry.

 

If you still want to get a culinary degree, consider a community college. You're bound to have a few of those around you, check to see if any schools offer a culinary major. I'm currently studying baking & pastry at a reputable community college, and between my Pell grant, FAFSA, and one private scholarship that I won last fall, I haven't paid a dime to the school. Many schools - both CCs and culinary schools - have work-study programs. These are good because you get to offset the cost for school, and you get some work experience on your resume.

 

There are several options for you. A culinary degree, if you even feel that you need one, doesn't have to cost you an arm and a leg. Best of luck with whatever you decide!

post #3 of 29
Thread Starter 

Thank you so much for that! I know that you don't need a degree, but I just want to prove everyone that told me I can't make it in life wrong. Thank you so much for that. I will look into CC and if i can find a job in a restaurant i sure will take it and get all the experience that i can.

post #4 of 29

Sorry to hear that your parents don't recognize the Culinary world as a "real" job.

So indicative of what we discuss here daily.

post #5 of 29

now what fun would it be to invite those parents that don't see working in restaurant kitchens as a "real job" , to just come in and work there for a week.

then we'll talk again.

post #6 of 29

Oh i too have the unfortunate luck of having a father that dont support my culinary dream. 

I had to save cash for a year in order to achieve a very poor cooking certificate now that i want to step up my game and get a degree at a good school and advanced more in my career he definetly wont support it. 

Im still going to convince him otherwise. You would think after telling him about my culinary goals ever since i was 12 and having experience in the kitchen he would at least try to think about it tho. 

Funny though how he wont mind me making dinner... XD

 

Maybe ill let him starve :rolleyes: 

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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post #7 of 29
I enrolled in 5heir culinary program awhile ago and have learned a lot from it. I don't have the time to go to a full time program, so this is the best option.for me to improve my skills. They do have aot of videos and the recipes required for asessments require a lot of work. The other 5hing to note is that the Chef instructors have extensive professional experience. Wi5h that said, if I were going into food service as a full time career, I dont know if an employer would give that much weight to it or not. Anyone in th industry have any thought on it..would you hir some wi5h a certificate from there?
post #8 of 29
I'm just about half-way through their culinary arts program and have definitely learned a lot so far. The assessments you must complete are very difficult. You must submit several photos, and the chefs have no problem giving you an incomplete, offering critique and requesting that you re-do it. I definitely feel they aren't in it just to take your money. There are several videos to show the steps to complete the assessment and you are also encouraged to call or email the chefs with questions and they frequently call you as well to see how you are progressing. I have been cooking at home for a number of years and have still learned a lot. It may be worth looking into. Good luck.
post #9 of 29

@stryker93 An online culinary program would not be my recommendation. I think @PastrySMC has given the best advice. Start out slow working at a restaurant and see if it is truly what you want to do. Then invest in culinary school and I am huge supporter of community college culinary programs over the big schools which simply charge way to much now. With so many chefs making excellent salaries these days it is hard not to classify it as a real job.

 

 

I have added the Escoffier Online School to our database so @stryker93  if you attend would you mind posting a review of your experience?

 

 

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #10 of 29

I wouldn't go there at all. I had a friend who tried it out and they screwed him over. They didn't send him his knife set that they made him pay for, and its not even accredited. So do NOT give that school any money, it is a big scam. If you want proper online cooking check out Ashworth College's Gourmet Cooking and Catering class, I'm in the process of taking that class and it helps you a lot.

post #11 of 29

@AaronJack93 Can you describe a little of what taking an online culinary class is like. I it hard to comprehend how a gourmet cooking class would work in an online setting. Are there videos? Do you practice at home then go in and take a practical?

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #12 of 29

@Nicko Taking an online cooking class is totally different, but at the same time does help you a lot. You have multiple cooking videos to watch and you are recommended to cook the food and all, but they don't require you to. They teach you how to cook all kinds of different meals like: meat, pastry, rice, etc. They than teach you catering things as well, you do not need to go in to take a practical because you are only getting a Career Certificate to help improve your resume. It takes about 6 months to finish the whole course, and I'm on my 2nd month right now and It does help me a lot. I do practice at my home so I can use the skills in the kitchen later. It's just a cheap way to get more experience for someone that can't get aid for community colleges because your parents refuse to do the fafsa. 

post #13 of 29

Some people love to throw money away.

CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #14 of 29

I'm enrolled with Escoffier Online.  For a person working full-time with a family I have found it to be worthwhile.  Am I going to get hired by a Michelin starred restaurant?  Of course not.  Can I take what I'm learning and apply it at a local mom & pop restaurant to gain some kitchen experience?   Absolutely.  I have had nothing but good experiences.   When I first enrolled I purchased the mini-kit they offered.  They sent me the baking/pastry kit by mistake.   When I emailed to let them know, they immediately sent the right kit, and told me to just keep the other one.  My chef mentors have been great to work with.  The cooking assessments have been fair.  

post #15 of 29
Art, I totally agree with you. How far along are you? I just finished Culinary Groundwork..finally! Personally I believe unless you went to CIA or Johnson & Wales, and sometimes even then, you still have to work your way up. Anthony Bourdain basically says the same in "Kitchen Confidential". Good luck
post #16 of 29

Sorry I am so late replying.   I'm in the second course - hung up on having the time to work through some of the assessment (stocks!).   I'm still enjoying it, and learning a lot.  I hope to finish this fall.  

I have also been accepted to a 10 week culinary program through an organization called Second Helpings.  They do food rescue and offer job training.  It is intensive - 8 hours a day for 10 weeks.  I am hoping this will give me the hands on experience in a commercial kitchen that the Escoffier program can't offer.  

post #17 of 29

They do not accept FAFSA and PELL because they are not accredited.  They say they are "endorsed", but that doesn't mean much in the real world of education.  My advice echos the others about on the job and community college - best of luck with your decision.

post #18 of 29

Unless you have personal experience on how they work, I wouldn't call it a big scam.  Everyone has different experience.  I am currently enrolled in their program, and I couldn't have asked for a better customer service, and treatment from an "online" program.  The chefs are amazing, the videos are very detailed and the staff are "attentive." I'm not promoting Escoffier.  That's their job to go get students.  I'm merely letting you know about MY experience.  It's not an expensive program, and I have learned soooooooooooo much.  For the money?  I have not one regret.  I have been cooking since I was 8, and I thought I "knew" a bit about cooking.   The first class you take is the knife skills.  Oh I was so gung ho.  I thought "this is easy!"  I reviewed my stuff, make sure i did everything right before the photos, I held the knife perfect.  I got the Mise en place to perfection!   I got my grade/critique and boy he nailed me for every single little ****.  It was embarrassing to.....me.  The chef made me feel like I have NEVER been in the kitchen before.  Don't get me wrong, he was "pleasant" in his own way.

 

The Scoffier program taught me to read up some more.  It made me more like a food researcher than ever before (not a good thing personally since I have too much on my plate). I am far more adventurous with cooking than I have ever been and for that I am very thankful.  I also love photography so it taught me to A LOT about plating, and getting it to look like a magazine cover. 

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That "scam" program made me an OCD about food. 


Edited by Armahda - 6/7/14 at 1:22pm
post #19 of 29

I have been taking culinary classes through them for a few months. As a military spouse we are moving a lot. I have enrolled in 2 different culinary schools and had to drop them because my husband got orders again. The schools unfortunately don't transfer the credits for culinary because unlike most paper programs, they are all taught differently by the instructor. So even with having months if not a year invested in a program, when you move it wont follow you. This was the best option for me.  Is it like a true culinary program, no. But it does teach you the basics as well as teach you basic cooking methods not covered in a cookbook. Can the school help you advance in a career..yes. . You make what you can of the program. You study and you work hard and do the best you can with what you have to work with. For those discrediting it, well unless you have taken a program or class through them then you truly don't know. All culinary schools are at the very least is 2 years. I would recommend this school to anyone that could benefit from it. Whether it's finances, moving, limited schedule etc. It can really help you. Would I recommend a brick and mortar school over this, absolutely. But it's not a waste of money, because any education will help you in the long run.

post #20 of 29


@nhtom Hey there. Just wanted to chime in here. I am also looking at getting involved in the Escoffier Online. My goal is not to be the executive chef of a 5 star restaurant. My ultimate goal is to become a private/ personal chef. I feel though that getting some sort of background in the industry would be a good idea. Although I have been cooking/ experimenting at home for 8+ years I feel that no one would hire me without a certificate of some sort. I have been looking at joining APPCA also. What are your thoughts? Would Escoffier be a good idea for where I want to go? Also it is super expensive for the training kit through the APPCA. The Home study kit is over $500.  

post #21 of 29
Has anyone taken the bakery classes? I am interested in their baking / pastry chef program. Please let me know smile.gif
Thanks!
post #22 of 29
Hi,

I do know of a couple of graduates that have gone on to be personal chefs. Although you won't graduate with the same experience as someone who attends a 2/4yr program, it does provide good experience and improves your skills. I believe it was around $3,000
post #23 of 29

You can always do it by just working in a restaurant. It takes lots of time to get anywhere in this profession. Going to an online collage or program will never hurt anyone. I have a friend that just won best chef under 30 in Belgium, who has also worked at a 2 star Michelin restaurant before. He now owns his own restaurant and will be competing for best chef under 30 in the world come June, and he just started by working at a saute station.     

post #24 of 29

hello i want to introduce myself.to everyone.I became a chef accidentally.im an engineer graduate.so I did not go any culinary school but.almost 10years experience as a sous chef in spanish restaurant.so now im getting older.and have 3 kids.no chance to go culinary school.
the reason I joined here is;

1.to feed more knowledge about restaurant bussiness
2.recommendation to study online course with certificate for;
a.chef certificate
b.safety and hygiene certification

 

                    thanks

post #25 of 29
Hi, I'm also a mil-spouse, are you still enrolled I the program? What was your experience with the school?
post #26 of 29

There are some large establishments, hotels, seniors homes, resorts etc that will help pay for courses as long as you are working for that company.

 

 

Just a thought

Whenever possible use local products, be it produce, meat, cheese, wine or beer! 

And local here means within the two counties near us!

Our guests will appreciate it and possibly return because of it!

Reply

Whenever possible use local products, be it produce, meat, cheese, wine or beer! 

And local here means within the two counties near us!

Our guests will appreciate it and possibly return because of it!

Reply
post #27 of 29

I work there as an admissions advisor.  I'm not sure what happened to your friend and why he didn't get the kit he paid for...  but I assure you we are the only program out there working with the Escoffier Family to bring you the science behind the cooking like no other program out there can.  We have an A with the better business bureau and we are legit!

post #28 of 29
I took the course about a year ago and found the scoring system to be a bit strange. I had a lot of trouble getting my mentor to e mail me back and the community though very friendly, was quite sparse. I'm going to try rouxbe this time around but sad to say I don't feel escoffieronline was money well spent
post #29 of 29

I am going to take the baking & pastry fundamentals courses of Escoffieronline. Thanks guys, I made the determination because of your comments here.

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