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Need help converting recipe amounts

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I make cookies, brownies for a living.  I measure everything in grams; however,  I don't know how to convert (adjust the ingredients) when I go from a 5x batch to a 10x batch.  (i.e., chocolate chip cookies).  When I tried it, they came out too sweet.  At what point do you not multiply and just make a fresh batch.  Thanks for your help.

post #2 of 18

This page has some handy converting/scaling info.

 

http://culinaryarts.about.com/od/measurementsconversions/a/scaling.htm

 

Kyle

"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thank, Kyle.  I have saved this to my bookmark folder.  However, would this formula also apply to baking as well?

post #4 of 18

I don't see why it wouldn't. Fire off a test batch and see. I'd use it to halve an existing recipe. If it works great! If it doesn't you at least contained the waste. Back in the dark ages, when I was baking lots of cookies, I just multiplied the ingredients by the number of batches I wanted to bake.

 

Kyle

"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
post #5 of 18

it should work, just recipe quantities times ten.

how it comes out too sweet, is beyond me…….

you need enough baking sheets though……good planning in timing. or whatever fits your oven….for cookies its no problem to make up a big batch and just bake them staggered, take one batch out and put the next in.

post #6 of 18

>>how it comes out too sweet, is beyond me…….

this is why:
>> just recipe quantities times ten

 

some herb/spices/flavors are extremely potent and a little bit goes more than 2x(a little bit) batch

 

like sugar; and the less refined the sugar, the more pronounced the effect.

 

all from personal experience because I have never seen or heard or seen reference to any "sizing web site" that has specifics on how much of what to decrease/increase per multiple of batch size.

 

as mentioned - it's apparently all experimental.

post #7 of 18

Sounds like you need to work with baker's percentages. It's the most accurate way to multiply recipes up or down. You aren't actually doubling or tripling ingredients, you are using them in the proper ratios within the recipe. Here's a link from the King Arthur website that can explain it in more detail.

https://www.kingarthurflour.com/professional/bakers-percentage.html

Good luck!

post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefMo1 View Post
 

Sounds like you need to work with baker's percentages. It's the most accurate way to multiply recipes up or down. You aren't actually doubling or tripling ingredients, you are using them in the proper ratios within the recipe. Here's a link from the King Arthur website that can explain it in more detail.

https://www.kingarthurflour.com/professional/bakers-percentage.html

Good luck!


About a year ago I got my first "cook's scale" made by Oxo, with an upper limit of 5 pounds and I have never looked back at my measuring cups.  I wished I began my baking experience using a scale instead of those time consuming measuring cups.

 

The advantage is this:  I own a couple of expensive bannetons and my dough, once fully proofed, wasn't close to filling them.  So I scaled up the recipe by ultimately 120 grams and voila, I have a more vertical rise to the dough and a much better oven spring since the proofed dough is taller.  In essence, I went from a 700g of flour to 830g and a simple multiplication allowed me to calculate the amount of water that was needed.  Simple.  Just try doing THAT using measuring cups.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #9 of 18

Professional bakers always work with weight as opposed to volume (cups, teaspoons, etc), so that helps too.

One point about the OXO scale is in my experience it was pretty expensive, like $50 and it does not do digital measurements. For example it reads 2 1/4 ounces instead of 2.25. So if you need 2.35 ounces you will not get an accurate measurement and if you really need precision that can be a problem. I would go with something like an Escali that is about half the price, goes up to 11 pounds.

post #10 of 18

Another scale option, My Weigh KD7000. I've had mine for a while and like it. It's less than $50.00

 

Mode: Capacity: Resolution:
Pounds : Ounces 15lb : 7 oz 0.1 oz
Pounds 15.450 lb 0.002 lb
Ounces 246.9 oz 0.05 oz
Grams 7000 g 1 g
Kilograms 7.000 kg 0.001 kg

 

Kyle

"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefMo1 View Post
 

Professional bakers always work with weight as opposed to volume (cups, teaspoons, etc), so that helps too.

One point about the OXO scale is in my experience it was pretty expensive, like $50 and it does not do digital measurements. For example it reads 2 1/4 ounces instead of 2.25. So if you need 2.35 ounces you will not get an accurate measurement and if you really need precision that can be a problem. I would go with something like an Escali that is about half the price, goes up to 11 pounds.

 

My Oxo scale costed less than $30 from Zappos.com and I mostly use the metric readout on the display even though I occasionally use the avoirdupoids measurements.  And I don't need an 11 pound limit for my use and could care less about going from 2.25 to 2.35 oz.  Grams are way more accurate.  ANd I use standard weights to check the accuracy of the scale and it's right on.  And I've worked in chemistry labs and have several years of college chemistry behind me and in most of my cooking a couple of grams won't make a difference unless weighing out leavenings.


Edited by kokopuffs - 2/4/14 at 6:01pm

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #12 of 18

Simple solution. Look for a culinary calculator and you are good to go. I bought mine when I was still in culinary class. It doesn't cost you much. I think it is less than $20.00 and it help me a lot. Particularly in recipe conversion.

post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by KyleW View Post
 

Another scale option, My Weigh KD7000. I've had mine for a while and like it. It's less than $50.00...

 

I just might upgrade to that scale to get the yield on my pork bellies-to-bacon adventures in order to determine yield.

 

@KyleW, do you possess a set of standard weights to check the accuracy of your scale???????  

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #14 of 18
No standard weights here. "Close enough for government wrk." Is my motto.
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by KyleW View Post

No standard weights here. "Close enough for government wrk." Is my motto.


That won't do.  The first Ohaus triple beam that I purchased was off by two grams when the poises were set to 15 grams, and off by much further when set to 100 grams.  Never EVER trust a scale that has never been tested against a set of standard weights.  NEVER.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #16 of 18
I will take that under advisement smile.gif
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
Reply
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by KyleW View Post

I will take that under advisement smile.gif



You'll take that from a chemist!    8DDDD

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by KyleW View Post

Another scale option, My Weigh KD7000. I've had mine for a while and like it. It's less than $50.00

...

 


I use this scale professionally and purchased it from Old Will Knot Scales last summer for around $35. I believe it was on sale at the time. It works well for the bakery at a mid-sized family summer camp.
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