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Corned beef help

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I may need to provide kosher-style corned beef for a deli dinner. I could use some help figuring out shrinkage. I want to figure something like 1/4 pound per sandwich (that seems okay doesn't it?) but I'm not sure how much a wet-packed corned beef shrinks after simmering. Is it as much as 50%? More?

 

I can get decent corned beef (Sy Ginsberg) at Costco for $3.89/pound. Also, can it be frozen in the package before cooking, in the brine? Or is that a no-no? I'm never sure how long they'll have it on hand, and they aren't either, although I can guess they'll have it till St. Pat's Day. The dinner is the third week of February.

 

I'm not sure if they'll want to serve it hot or cold, but if it's hot, I'll be re-warming it. The temple's kitchen doesn't have a stove or pots to cook enough corned beef for what we hope will be 50 diners.

 

Thanks in advance!

Mezzaluna

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post #2 of 9
Shrinkage is not too bad if you ate dry roasting but i never tend to roast mine you sacrifice quality for shrink waste for better flavor i always braise them and then you have a bit of shrinkage about 30 35 percent is what i figure the only draw back is if you add veg to the braise to flavor the meat then it would not be trully kosher if you simmer it you lose a little more but the moistness is still there as far as freezing goes i would not recomend it but that's just my opinion
post #3 of 9

I can only speak from a recent cooking of corned beef and cabbage. I did in this case purchase the only thing my local grocer offers as "corned beef" and it is vacuum packed in a heavy solution/brine. I would say I didn't lose 50% but around 30% at the point that it was fork tender.

post #4 of 9

I freeze corned beef all the time, buy when on sale and into the freezer. Comes out fine. Flat cut the shrinkage is minimal, point cut it can be as high as 40%. I love it smoked in the spring for sandwiches, coat in black pepper, toss it on my Traeger until fork tender.

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

I have a 7 pound flat cut. I'm going to simmer it 3 hours, let it rest 15 minutes (minimum), then slice it thinly. I have a granton edged slicing knife. I'll leave some unsliced and slice that when it's chilled, just for comparison. I have a FoodSaver so I'll vacuum some of it for the people who will need to taste it and decide if it could possibly be used, or if we have to spend twice the amount or more and buy it from a deli. Personally, I think it's pretty good. This is a fundraiser, not a gourmet event. I believe people should always have a good product for the money, and they'll get a good, generous sandwich with all the trimmings, a beverage and homemade dessert for their donation. 

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post #6 of 9

chill then slice is the way to go for uniform slices, while hot it may tend to shred a bit unless your knife is super sharp

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 

I agree! I sliced it while still hot, but the knife was really sharp and I was able to slice it very thinly. I have an electric sharpener because I have no training or skill with stones; I'm a home cook. ;)

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post #8 of 9

I have found that after cooking (a long time) and trimming of fat allow  40 to 50% shrinkage. There is no such thing as Kosher style it either is kosher or it isn't , depending on the source of the meat.

      They say kosher style so they can charge more.

 

   Try Mosley brand  which is leaner and less money. and not kosher. let the beef cool in water you cook it in if possible ,so consider that in cook time  trim  fat then slice on a slicer for better yield.

I DO NOT AGREE WITH SLICING WHEN HOT YOU WILL LOOSE JUICES and more yield

.  Slice and stack in layers  with paper in between and cover with moist towl to stop drying out..

Off the top of my head I would estimate I have cooked over 10,000 briskets in my cooking career., most were certified Kosher with accompaning letters on delivery  from rabbis.

 

ALSO  Who is SY Ginsberg???

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post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

Ed, I have no clue who Sy Ginsberg is! :lol:  I do know the difference between kosher and kosher style. My reference was only to flavor. Of course, I'd much rather use an electric slicer! But we don't have one at our small temple and I'm not going to buy one myself. (I can't imagine the slashed fingers if we put one in our temple's do-it-yourself kitchen!!! :eek: To say nothing of the poor clean-up job and attendant sanitation problems.) So if I end up doing this, I'll slice it by hand. I do have some experience, having done this at an established deli dinner a few times in the past.

 

I'm getting some really good ideas for storing the meat. You guys are GREAT.

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