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If I own an electric sharpener, does it matter what type of knife I buy?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

Unfortunately my chefs knife disappeared on my latest move, BUT, the silver lining is that I get to buy a new one.  I was looking at the Wusthof Classic 8".  I like the way it feels in my hand, I like the weight of the knife, and it obviously cuts extremely well.  However, I have always enjoyed the sharpness of a Japanese knife.  Now, I bought and use the Edgeware Ceramic Pro knife sharpener, which uses ceramic wheels to sharpen to 17.5 Degrees.  So, because of that, does it even matter which I get? After the first run on the sharpener, both the Wusthof and any Japanese knife should be the same sharpness, correct?

 

If this is bad for the knife, I thought about buying the Kitchen IQ Adjustable Angle sharpener, so that I could go to whatever angle the knife is supposed to be sharpened to.  

 

If there are any other recommendations of 8" chefs knives in the range, please let me know! 

 

Thanks in advance.

post #2 of 5

Probably not. There's a lot of variables that enter into sharpness and the perception of sharpness. The Japanese blade will likely be thinner giving a better overall cutting geometry. The Japanese blade will likely have a higher grade steel capable of thinner geometry still at the edge, as well as sustaining a higher level of polish which can make for a sharper blade. 

 

The 17.5 may be more obtuse than the angle of the japanese blade is ground with. It will be less than the Wusthof came with. You'll have some variable geometries until they both are reprofiled to this particular angle. 

 

Further, the Japanese blade will likely hold the edge longer giving a greater sense of sharpness in your actual use as the Wusthof will dull more quickly. 

 

The general consensus of this site is that electric sharpeners are a poor choice, especially for a good Japanese blade. Also 9 or 10 inch blades are recommended and preferred over 8 inches. 

 

Look at the Knife section of http://www.cookfoodgood.com/ he's written a lot here at cheftalk as well. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the quick reply! 

 

I've been doing a lot of reading and am seeing that electric is frowned upon.  Using a stone is DEFINITELY not for me, I just don't have the time.  Thoughts on the adjustable? Should I craigslist the old electric and go manual? Here is a link to a product description.  

 

http://www.knifemerchant.com/product.asp?productID=8209&gclid=CLKdjaOwpLwCFacDOgodpSAArQ

post #4 of 5

throw the electric sharpener in the trash; then it won't matter what knife you buy.

 

>>posts 1

no clue what your background is - so here's a ten second primer:

(highly generalized)

 

Japanese knives are thought to be made from "harder" steel

ignore: stainless vs. 'carbon' and all the pros/cons of those metals

 

harder steel will sharpen to a finer edge, so they say.

I don't shave with my knives, so I have limited experience on what a 0.2 micron mirror edge will do for me.

 

'harder' regrets also translates to 'more brittle' - go forth a search and you'll find a number of posts with really ugly pictures of really expensive Japanese super hard / super sharp knives with big chunks missing.

 

I find the clunker, dis-stained, heavy, out-moded, old fashion stainless steel "european" style aka in my case Wuesthof, work peachy keen - over decades. 

 

learn to sharpen your knives.  it's a very valuable skill.  a cook and his stones makes a happy kitchen.

post #5 of 5

Friends don't let friends use electric sharpeners.  Unless they're belt grinders but that's a whole nuther deal.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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