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Baking flapjack in bulk

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I need to make flapjack in large quantities but don't have a stove in my very small bakery. I have a microwave but it will take many turns at melting the butter, sugar and syrup - does anyone reckon I could melt these ingredients on a low heat in my ovens? I believe mine are called bake off ovens, I can't fit decks in :-(. Also - does it have to be demerera? I have so much caster sugar to use up...


post #2 of 6

your note is a bit confusing over here in the colonies.


flapjacks as in american english "pancakes"?


perhaps you should post your recipe.


pancakes out of my kitchen are


pinch salt

baking powder

sugar - 'granulated' aka caster

milk or buttermilk

the recipe calls for vegetable oil, I usually leave it out.


butter could of course be used in place of  the oil, and I doubt butter knows whether it was melted in an oven or on a induction burner.


heating the syrup - which here is a topping, not put in the batter - could also easily be done in an oven.


are you melting the sugar?

post #3 of 6

I think UK flapjacks are what we call bars or cookies.


Ovens are hot enough to melt. Never tried it myself. As you know sugar burns easily too. You could make a test try to see.  Sugar will start breaking down when it reaches a temperature over 102C and the warmer it gets the thicker and harder it gets because loss of moisture .


As for the type of sugar, not sure it makes much different after it is melted other than one is finer than the other before melting.  The end amount is what you are after.

Edited by wlong - 2/1/14 at 9:13am
post #4 of 6

>>I think UK flapjacks are what we call bars or cookies.


bingo!  that's one Brit term I've not encountered, but "research" sez' it's so.


demerera sugar as I understand is a "brown" aka not completely "refined sugar.

in USA "brown sugar" is white refined sugar to which molasses has been "added back"


demerera otoh is a brown sugar from earlier in the refining process - it's "brown" not because molasses has been "added back" but rather because it was never "removed" in the refining process.


now,,, "brown sugars" do not behave like "white refined sugars" in baking.  they hold more moisture, make for chewy vs crisp, plus the molasses taste thing,,,, so mewouldthink using demerera vs white refined/caster='superfine'  will make a difference.

post #5 of 6

Yes you are right.  I forgot that demerara sugar was brown, I was thinking finer grain.  It happens with age ;)

post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thank you wlong, taken on board about the melting point, had only intended a very low heat. Dillbert - thanks for your tips about the taste, sticking with demerera.

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