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Knife kit for culinary school.

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

My school sells 4 selections of knife kits and I've been looking into which is the best choice and haven't found much info so I thought I'd ask for input here the 2 that I'm interested in are a Henckel Knife Kit (359.99) and a Victorinox Knife Kit (229.99) links to both below. Thanks for any help, Alex

 

http://gbcbookstore.bookware3000.ca/eSolution/item.php?item=4009839325175&data=01350103    (Henckle)

http://gbcbookstore.bookware3000.ca/eSolution/item.php?item=88880029204&data=01350103         (Victorinox)

post #2 of 12

Victorinox has a good reputation here but I'd prefer a set having man-made materials for the handles.  Checkout this website, too.  Wooden handles are a pita.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #3 of 12

I mostly agree with Kokopuffs, but I would expand a bit.

 

First, my preference would be the same as Kokopuffs.  In a showdown between a more expensive Henckels vs. a less expensive Victorinox, I would go Victorinox.  And I would probably want Fibrox handles rather than Rosewood, for school.  Too many knives develop legs and you need to keep your expenses as minimal as possible.

 

Second, this is for school.  It looks like the recommended kits may be a "take-it-or-else" requirement, so the first thing I would do is ask whether you can put together your own kit, and (I emphasize here) tell them the kit will be exactly as functional as what is offered through the school.  And then ask how much time you have to get everything together.  If the answer is - "Buy it from Us ONLY", then bite the bullet and buy the Victorinox.  If the answer is, "You need it IMMEDIATELY" with no time to assemble your own kit, then bite the bullet and buy the Victorinox.

 

If you can assemble your own kit, then check out Kokopuff's recommendation and also check out Amazon.com, Chef Knives To Go, Cutlery and More, and any other site you can, but do all of this ASAP - you probably won't have much time and time will be of the essence here, not just money.

 

One additional issue I would bring up - if the school doesn't deal with it, think about how you are going to sharpen your knives - and start reading the posts in ChefTalk about knife sharpening.

 

 

Galley Swiller

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the replies, it seems to me for school cheaper is better and non wood is a better choice. If thats the case there was a cheaper set they were selling as well with the plastic handles Cci Euro Knife Kit (149.99) . Also I have recently sent an email asking about building my own kit so we will see.

 

 

http://gbcbookstore.bookware3000.ca/eSolution/item.php?item=776847333624&data=01350103

post #5 of 12

Build your own kit as some of those knives in the school's recommended kit may never get used.  Just my .02 worth.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #6 of 12

I looked up CCI - Canada Cutlery.  There are no reviews or forum posts that I could immediately find, but I did look up the web site.  The steel is stock, standard X50CrMoV15 - also known as 4116 steel.  It's what Victorinox, Wusthof, Mercer, Messermeister, etc., etc., etc., etc. all use in their "Top of the Line" knives.  However, there's quite a difference between just starting with that steel and end up with a good quality knife blade - heat treatment is the main difference consideration between knife manufacturers.

 

Since you are in Canada, I will have to defer to the Canadian authorities as to how Canada Customs will deal with importation of cutlery and duties on imports from other countries, such as the U.S.

 

Galley Swiller

post #7 of 12

Combine knives to make an afordable good set.

My advice is get a 240mm Sabatier (k-sab maybe even the inox version will suit your needs), a fibrox parer and, a bonning (fibrox or a Sab maybe), a bread knife (tojiro ITK) and a Steel (F Dick or idahone). A good add in is a peeler (cheap one)

Notice that the only japanese is the bread knife, just because it is amazing and just like a western knife. This way your instructors Chefs will not pick on you about "too sharp japanese knives", as we've heard before.

And all those can be found in Canada.

 

Daniel.

post #8 of 12

I myself like using the peeler made by Oxo.


Edited by kokopuffs - 2/11/14 at 6:12am

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #9 of 12
I also use an oxo peeler but its a y peeler. Best peeler I've used. I also second the comments about building your ownn kit if available. The victorinox fibrox is a great line for the money and the handles are pretty comfortable, great when wet. Check out the sites galley mentioned but obviously consider shipping as it may negate any savings. The kit your school put together is actually pretty comprehensive without a lot of overlap. I think you would be able to get all of your tasks done with those knives. The nice thing about victorinox paring knives is that they are cheap ($5-8) so if you are using them a lot you can easily have a couple back ups laying around
post #10 of 12

Since this is a school issue, I hope the OP has gotten answers as to (1) how much time he has to get his kit; and (2) whether or not the school will allow him to assemble his own kit.

 

Since students are invariably by definition "impoverished", If I were putting together my own kit, I'd also try to opt for a mostly Victorinox fibrox line - at least where I am (in the US).  But the OP being in Toronto, Canada, I suspect there will be snags with that type of generic recommendation.

 

The OP might try to find a few local Toronto sources of Victorinox cutlery and price it out.  I did a google search and came up with a few dated names, but only one with on-line Victorinox fibrox open stock pricing from a single (Toronto) source: RealFoodToronto.com  ( http://www.realfoodtoronto.com/home.php?cat=222 ).  They are also linked to a retail food shop, The Healty Butcher, with 3 retail stores. 

 

The school list is as follows, with prices as listed on the RealFoodToronto.com web site:

 

12 inch sharpening steel - Idahone Ceramic Honing Rod - $36.99

10 inch bread knife - $42.99

9 inch spatula - ?

10 inch chef's knife - $46.99

3.5 inch paring - $6,99

6 inch boning - $24.99

peeler - Victorinox ergonomic - $5.50

 

roll wrap sold separately

 

My variations from the school list are as follows:

 

Unless otherwise listed, everything was Victorinox fibrox.  I am somewhat hesitant about positively identifying the boning knife as the one I listed as being the same type as desired by the school.  Boning knives come in different lengths, different flexibility (stiff, semi-stiff, or flexible) and different curvature (straight or raised).  Combine that with handle types, and there are upwards of 6 different versions available for a Victorinox Fibrox 6 inch boning knife!

 

Spatulas were not listed on the RealFoodToronto site.  But it is not too unlikely that another local source, such as a restaurant supply shop, can supply one.  It's not as if the spatula was to be considered an item which has an edge that wears.

 

I substituted the Idahone Ceramic honing rod for the Victorinox Rosewood Handle steel, since the Idahone is not only less expensive, but actually a better product.  Its one drawback is that it has to be kept from falling to the floor and shattering - but if it is put in a knife roll when not in use, it should be fine.

 

The tally (not including the spatula) was $164.45.  That excludes the spatula, and substitutes the Idahone, but is all Victorinox otherwise and is a known and recognizable kit which is probably equal to or better than the CCI Euro kit, for not that much more money.

 

In due defference to other stores in the Toronto area, I must confess that I may have missed many of the other Victorinox retailers in the Toronto area.  But at least this is a comparative list that can be used in price comparison shopping.

 

Pricing between U.S. prices and Canadian prices can be a real shocker.  For example, a 10" Victorinox chef's knife on Amazon.ca runs in the $90 Canadian range ($85 Canadian for a 250 mm Victorinox fibrox "Swiss Classic" Chef's knife).

 

Hope that helps.

 

 

Galley Swiller

post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 

I ended up getting a set mostly made up of the Victorinox fibrox line like you suggested. I've been trying them out with home cooking a bit really like the feel of them, Great suggestions thanks. 

post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al-Burt View Post
 

I ended up getting a set mostly made up of the Victorinox fibrox line like you suggested. I've been trying them out with home cooking a bit really like the feel of them, Great suggestions thanks. 

 

I like my Victorinox 8" Chef's knife, 3" pairing and the Santoku with granton sides but I used to sharpen with an electric Chef's Choice sharpener and it removed too much material, now I'm worried about sharpening the Santoku and getting to the granton scallops. If I ever end up having to toss it I might replace it with a Japanese Nakiri knife which can double as a scoop. I recently got an Edge Pro Apex to sharpen with water stones while maintaining the angle I want so I don't remove too much material but the damage is done to that knife. Think about how you will sharpen now because you will soon need to. Water stones are the best for your knife and there are some inexpensive options. Good luck in your endevours!

 

 

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