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Bakers Math- I need help!!

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I am a culinary arts student. I am taking a culinary math class and I am having trouble understanding the baking percentage formulas. I get the recipe costing and purchasing, but I just don't get the baking part. I know this is simple for some, but I'm having a little trouble.This is my first post so go easy on me.

post #2 of 6
You will find a google search will turn up your answer, but I done that for you this time. Maybe you could get another student to better explain it to you. https://www.kingarthurflour.com/professional/bakers-percentage.html
Edited by wlong - 2/6/14 at 10:30am
post #3 of 6

the King Arthur reference is (obviously) spot on - but the concept is exceeding simple _if_ one first accepts the idea of weighing things vs cups and teaspoons and tablespoons, etc (i.e. volumetric measuring)

 

simple concept:  everything that goes in the dough / batter is added as a percentage - by weight - of the amount of flour you start out with.

 

trying to work out "bakers' math" on the basis of "six cups of flour" is utterly doomed.

 

prime example:  bread dough "hydration" - it is the percentage of water by weight added to the flour.

starting with 500 grams of flour, a 60% hydration dough requires 300 grams of water (500 x 0.60)

same for salt, yeast, sugar, shortening, butter, slash 'whatever'

 

'invented' because large scale bakers weigh things - it is just more accurate, end of story. 

turns out, by old time definitions - not "strictly accurate to the nth degree" anymore - 300 grams of water = 300 milliliters, so one can limp by using some volumetric measures.... ignoring the issue of, if you have a digital scale, it's a lot easier to measure up 300 grams of water vs squinting across a measuring cup to decipher if you're at the 300 ml mark yet....

post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dillbert View Post
... some volumetric measures.... ignoring the issue of, if you have a digital scale, it's a lot easier to measure up 300 grams of water vs squinting across a measuring cup to decipher if you're at the 300 ml mark yet....

And the fact that the scale is accurate to, at the minimum, 1 gram, or ml in this case, while "squinting across a measuring cup" rarely is accurate to 5-10 ml

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #5 of 6
Go to Baker's percent on 'Round the Chuckbox for several articles on the topic. (Yes, this is a shameless plug for the blog!)
post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thank you for all of the help and information,

 

from a humble student chef.

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