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Just learned about "umami". - Page 2

post #31 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

For goodness sake stop already!
Troll went bye bye.
Which I am pretty sure was the goal of the whole "Who's on first" exercise.
JP thank for sharing that Umami Dust label.
I see the product is made in US.
Starting the search now.

mimi

 

I found the conversation enjoyable.

post #32 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

For goodness sake stop already!
Troll went bye bye.
Which I am pretty sure was the goal of the whole "Who's on first" exercise.
JP thank for sharing that Umami Dust label.
I see the product is made in US.
Starting the search now.

mimi


my pleasure,mimi!the dust is really for seasoning cooked food & salads etc,instead of salt & pepper.it's great for seasoning flour before frying or minced(ground) meat for burgers etc,'cos it distributes evenly & doesn't add any moisture.they also make it as a paste,in tubes,which is for sauces & casseroles etc etc

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post #33 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

....
I see the product is made in US.
Starting the search now.

mimi

 

mimi, I think you better search in the UK. The authentic "Umami #5" product is invented by an English woman called Laura Santtini. At first there was only a paste in a tube that made a lot of chefs and foodies look very skeptical, but the stuff soon became a success. Laura Santtini has her own website; http://www.laurasanttini.com/

I just noticed that she also has a busy facebook page!

 

I may also add that a good and cheap umami product to add to your preparations is simply... Worcestershire sauce!

post #34 of 50
Thanks guys.
Chris.. I took a quick look at the site last nite and noted a Florida addy, but also noted she is looking for American distributors.
I was aware of the W sauce being a good source but was drawn to the many flavors present in the dust.
Hoped for a more complex profile and the lack of salt was appealing as well.
Not that I don't like W sauce cuz I use it often.
Anyway I guess the fact that Amazon didn't offer it yet should have been a clue lol.

mimi
post #35 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

Thanks guys.
Chris.. I took a quick look at the site last nite and noted a Florida addy, but also noted she is looking for American distributors.
I was aware of the W sauce being a good source but was drawn to the many flavors present in the dust.
Hoped for a more complex profile and the lack of salt was appealing as well.
Not that I don't like W sauce cuz I use it often.
Anyway I guess the fact that Amazon didn't offer it yet should have been a clue lol.

mimi


pm me with a shipping address,mimi & i'll send you a tub.can't imagine any import reg problems etc,as it's made in the states.

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post #36 of 50

Another seasoning to boost flavor, which I forgot to use in my raw fish dishes is furikake.  It is available in several different varieties, also called rice seasoning, and should be easily found at a local Asian market, if you have such a place.

 

mjb.

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post #37 of 50

I'm planning on making an umami butter, using butter of course and some elements that are suspected of having a high umami level, like dried porcini, dried shiitake, garlic, tomato purée, soy sauce, maybe a little red wine or better yet, a little Madeira wine...

I will also add a sprinkle of piment d'Espelette which smells and tastes like a combination of paprika and a strong tomato extract.

 

Should be easy to make in a roll and kept in the freezer. Butter is an absolute perfect carrier and transmitter of flavor!

 

I'm planning to rehydrate the porcini and shiitake, chop them up, fry in olive oil with garlic, add some soaking juice, red wine, soy sauce, tomato purée, a little salt and let it simmer slowly until all liquid is gone and a paste is left. Leave to cool and then add a little piment d'Espelette. Fold it all into fresh farm butter at room temperature and make a roll wrapped in cling film. Wonder if I could get that in a tube... will it keep??

 

Any suggestions welcome.

post #38 of 50

Well you could fold in the butter with the ingedrients and do the same prep as what you would do with compound butter. 

I assume putting it in the fridge after its been molded and wrapped would make it keep its form. 

Something to test out for sure. 

 

Problem would be the amount of liquid being folded in the butter which could interfere in it setting and keeping its mold while wrapped and stored in the fridge. Of course assuming you are prepping and finishing the butter in the same method as compound butter ...

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post #39 of 50

You also might try grinding the dried mushrooms into powder and folding it into your butter because the dried have 4 times the umami of rehydrated ones.

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post #40 of 50

here's the ingredients in the umami paste.as you can see it is a different mix to the dust.chris,i mix it with butter for "instant" "caesar salad butter".the butter is fab when stirred into a mixture of steamed peas,leeks,green beans & bacon....oh boy:lips:!!i roll any left over butter in shrink wrap,into a cylinder & freeze it,no worries!!

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post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonPaul View Post


pm me with a shipping address,mimi & i'll send you a tub.can't imagine any import reg problems etc,as it's made in the states.

Thanks JP!
You sir are a gentleman and a scholar.....

mimi
post #42 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post


Thanks JP!
You sir are a gentleman and a scholar.....

mimi


maybe....ha!couple of tubs of the dust are airborne as we speak.should be with you monday,mimi!

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post #43 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

You also might try grinding the dried mushrooms into powder and folding it into your butter because the dried have 4 times the umami of rehydrated ones.

Oh, I didn't know that! I presume it's not easy to blitz dried porcini or shiitake into a powder since they have almost a leathery consistency, not crunchy at all. Maybe freezing them overnight would help?

Anyway, I'm going to make a first batch with reconstituted porcini. Yesterday I used some porcini soaking liquid that I made a few days earlier and the taste is still incredibly strong. In fact, the whole experiment is not all that easy. I have no idea in what quantities to use the ingredients. No problem however, I loooooove experiments. 

 

While tasting that porcini liquor, I suddenly realized that it reminded me of... our fabulous dark abbey beers. I'm going to soak my dried mushrooms in abbey beer and use that as a braising liquid for the other stuff.

I'm also planning a second batch in which I will use uncooked ingredients, so I do need a method to try to turn dried mushrooms in a powder. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KaiqueKuisine View Post
 

Well you could fold in the butter with the ingedrients and do the same prep as what you would do with compound butter. 

I assume putting it in the fridge after its been molded and wrapped would make it keep its form. 

Something to test out for sure. 

 

Problem would be the amount of liquid being folded in the butter which could interfere in it setting and keeping its mold while wrapped and stored in the fridge. Of course assuming you are prepping and finishing the butter in the same method as compound butter ...

 

The idea is indeed to make what you call a compound butter that can be kept in the freezer. We call those butter sausages "herb butters" with its number one product being "beurre Maître d'hôtel" made with mainly parsley and garlic.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonPaul View Post
 

here's the ingredients in the umami paste.as you can see it is a different mix to the dust.chris,i mix it with butter for "instant" "caesar salad butter".the butter is fab when stirred into a mixture of steamed peas,leeks,green beans & bacon....oh boy:lips:!!i roll any left over butter in shrink wrap,into a cylinder & freeze it,no worries!!

 

Thanks for posting those ingredients JP! I already had an idea that Mrs. Santtini composed a product that also contains all of the other flavors; salt, sugar, bitter (olives) and sour (vinegar) but still with a strong accent on the umami ingredients.

 

I gave it all a good thought and decided to use dried porcini and shiitake, garlic, dark abbey beer (bitter, sweet and sour), tomato purée, soy sauce (salt), anchovies (salt), all spice berry, clove, piment d'Espelette, olive oil and of course, fresh farm butter.

 

I can already imagine adding a small chunk of this butter to a dark sauce or even putting a small slice of butter on a cooked piece of beef. 

post #44 of 50

One of greatest sushi chef alive: 85 year-old Jiro Ono, owner of Sukyabashi Jiro, a modest 10-seat, sushi-only restaurant located in a Tokyo subway station that has earned a 3-star Michelin review (the first restaurant of its kind to garner such prestige).

 

Jiro Dreams of Sushi.

 

 Jiro eloquently describes sushi as the union of fish and rice. The yoga of two worlds: the earth and sea. True success is created by honoring the balance between the two.

 

In terms of flavor, this is understood through patience, execution, and tradition in technique.

In preparation, this is defined by consistency and ethic.

In taste it is described as umami.

 

In the West,,

umami is understood as a meat flavor or feel. Often times it is described as the flavor of the shiitake mushroom.

 

This linear definition butchers the Japanese connotation.

 

 

In the film Jiro’s son explains the true nature of umami as a balance.

In regards to food, it is the proper combination of flavors, texture, and product that creates umami.

 

 

However, umami is not restricted to food; it is also the feeling of drinking a good beer. Nor is it restricted to the kitchen; it is also the feeling of a warm bath. Umami is a feeling of perfect balance

 

 

Jiro’s eldest son Yoshikazu, describes Umami as follows: “It denotes the feeling of experiencing something so overpoweringly wonderful that you reflexively say “aaaaaahhhhhhhh.”

 

 

Food for thought, Cheers!,

 

 

EDG

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True art, is to conceal art......

 

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post #45 of 50

I grind dried mushrooms in a spice (AKA coffee) grinder.

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post #46 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by EverydayGourmet View Post
 

...

 Jiro eloquently describes sushi as the union of fish and rice. The yoga of two worlds: the earth and sea. True success is created by honoring the balance between the two.

 

In terms of flavor, this is understood through patience, execution, and tradition in technique.

In preparation, this is defined by consistency and ethic.

In taste it is described as umami.

 

In the West,,

umami is understood as a meat flavor or feel. Often times it is described as the flavor of the shiitake mushroom.

 

This linear definition butchers the Japanese connotation.

 

 

In the film Jiro’s son explains the true nature of umami as a balance.

In regards to food, it is the proper combination of flavors, texture, and product that creates umami.

 

 

However, umami is not restricted to food; it is also the feeling of drinking a good beer. Nor is it restricted to the kitchen; it is also the feeling of a warm bath. Umami is a feeling of perfect balance

 

 

Maybe one could understand this is as the confusion that is created by the Japanese professor who discovered the 5th taste that he called "umami". The word umami has always been used in another general context and simply means "deliciousness" translated in English. They should have taken another word to describe the 5th taste as it now overshadows the general concept of the initial meaning of the word "deliciousness".

post #47 of 50

Umami butter, the experiment

 

So, this is an experiment as told. In fact the result is quite satisfying, let's say a taste bomb! I made this yesterday but I'm sure the taste will develop a little more today before it ends up in my freezer for use later on. the difficulty is in making the paste that will go in the butter; the taste is so strong that you have no idea how it will taste when folded in the butter. It's like operating in the dark. But, the end result is there!

 

Umami butter 1 Umami butter 2

 

The ingredienst; butter, dried shiitake and porcini, dark abbey beer, 1 (one) clove, a little Sichuan pepper, 3 all-spice berries, tomato paste, clove of garlic, piment d'Espelette. Calling in absent for the group photo; 2 anchovies fillets, 1 tbsp. of soy sauce, salt, 1 tsp. of white vinegar and 1 tbsp. of cane sugar.

The mushrooms were soaked in some beer, the rest was tested extensively by the cook. Clove, Sichuan pepper and all-spice were toasted in a dry pan, then crushed into a powder. Garlic and anchovies finely shopped.

 

Umami butter 3 Umami butter 4

 

I added a tbsp. of dark soy sauce to the soaking mushrooms, then blended it all but not too finely.

Started on low fire with olive oil, garlic, anchovies, spices, 1 tbsp of tomato purée and cooked until nearly dry while stirring continiously. Then added the mushroom blend and cooked very slowly until most moist was gone, again stirring all the time. I also added 1 tbsp. of raw cane sugar, 1 tsp of white vinegar and a pinch of salt.

 

Umami butter 6 Umami butter 7

 

Leave the wet paste to cool and add a pinch of piment d'Espelette. This chili from the French Basque region is known for its paprika/tomato-paste fragrance but also for its capacity to enhance other flavors, a bit like adding salt to a dish.

Then approx. 200 grams of butter was added.

 

Umami butter 8 Umami butter 9

 

Make a sausage of the preparation using cling film and refrigerate.

When set, I cut the sausage in slices and stored them in a plastic container. The slices rest on baking paper to keep them from sticking when they go in my freezer. By slicing them, you can easily get one piece out and leave the rest in the freezer. Also allows to break off a chunk easily when a small piece in required.

Still in my fridge today to let the flavors develop a bit further. Can't wait to use it!

post #48 of 50

That's genious cooking.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #49 of 50

Thanks for the very generous compliment, Ordo.

We're now a good day later, time for a test and taste. On one piece of bread I put a sample of cold umami butter, on another a warmed piece. All I can say is that I'm quite impressed.

The butter didn't enhance the flavors but mellowed them down a little. But, most impressive is that all flavors now have merged! Impossible to detect one of the separate ingredients.

 

The cold butter taste starts with a very distinct almost terrine de foie gras sensation, then the full "heartiness" comes.

The warmed butter smells and tastes simply divine, also impossible to detect one single ingredient. I thought the porcini would stand out, but it doesn't in any way.

That's a mission accomplished, umami butter it is.

 

Umami butter 10

post #50 of 50

I most certainly need to try this! Brilliant. Well, I will need more than one of the Abbey beers, but, well....

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