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Any critics of slow food? - Page 3

post #61 of 72

>>I see what you mean,

 

did you see the (quite some time back) episode of Gordon Ramsay going totally bonkers stark raving crazy because...

 

a restaurant menu listed/advertised "Maine" lobster but the catch actually came from Canada.

post #62 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisBelgium View Post
 

 

I totally agree. Slow food isn't meant to be an esoteric discussion item. I don't believe the slow-food movement ever tried to impose rules on anyone. It came as a reaction against fast-food and the standardization of fast-food; it is nonsense to eat the same burger in 50 different countries.

Every attempt to cook well at home is slow cooking imo. And yes, please do have a pizza in a pizzeria, the whole experience around a nice pizzeria is also what slow-food  is all about! Slow-food is more than local sourcing and eating seasonally!


More people need to read this post. "Slow food" is an older term for "Eat local". I grew up in a place where there weren't "politics" that a few people have mentioned here about this "movement". My parents farm grew everything we could ever need throughout the year without question throughout my childhood. I just thought this was the normal thing until I grew older. I still keep to the basis of: Fresh meat from where I live, not matter where I live. Vegetables from where I live as much as possible.

I think all food "movements" are bogus anyways. But if they get people to eat healthier and make a small fraction of the world a bit more sustainable(another marketing term), that is pretty awesome.

Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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Gourmandise is an impassioned, rational and habitual preference for all objects that flatter the sense of taste.
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post #63 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by wens View Post


As someone who swam up through college, what nights off?

Typical schedule for someone serious by hs is 90+ minutes in the morning, school, 2+ hours evening, some kind of land training 2-3 times per week which may replace some of the morning workouts, or may just be in addition. Weekends in the spring, summer, and early fall are meets, running from 4:30-8 or so Friday, and eight am to mid afternoon Saturday and Sunday. Unless there are finals, in which case you come back again from 6:30-9 or so.

Depending on location (shorter drives in more populated areas, generally) you might be a 2+ hour drive from home, making it impractical to drop off kiddo and get other stuff done.

 

 

Wens, where and when did you swim in College? PM me I'd like to get some info and ask some questions. Thanks!

post #64 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryB View Post                                                                                                                                                                                                                 This is where home canned and frozen produce comes into play, really easy to make a healthy pasta sauce or a hotdish(casserole for those not in the midwest). On nights off prepare things that create leftovers for the rest of the week. Roast a chicken or two, use the leftovers for a quick sandwich, salads, pasta... at the same time make a chuck roast. Leftovers from the chuck roast can go into tacos, burritos, sandwiches, salads... when I was working I only cooked on weekends and during the week I lived off the leftovers.

 

Mary,

 

How's things been? Wens made a good point so the time-line or schedule provided was very accurate so I add this with a chuckle........ What nights off?

 

These last couple days have been not the norm for us here since we only had High School Regional Champs to deal with but the next 5 weeks will be 4 day meets almost every week with 2 (possibly 3) out of town. Then Long Course competition starts. Our combined season's of long and short course can run from the last week of August through the first 3 days of August so when we say year round it really is about that. At a recent swim meet I saw a parent wearing a t-shirt that had this printed on it.....

 

Swimmer theory.......6 days a week / 5000 laps + 4 days of meet @ 8 hours a day = 30 seconds of competition. I was somehow laughing and distraught all at the same time.

 

Back to the topic.

 

The true nature or point I was trying to convey has actually been echoed a couple times here and I even think it's also in some of what you said. You do what you can when you can. Plus.....we do can or at least I did until we started qualifying for higher competition meets at a greater frequency.

 

Anyhow, I mentioned I try to stay out of the way of using any "P" word examples, points or thoughts because inhpo, it's all off balance. Some how a movement that was intended to make things more simple and wholesome has been taken over and over complicated by extremism. I firmly believe this is also why it costs so fricken much to try and live in a better manner. For Pete's sake! Some of the stuff takes less to produce so why?!?! I'm not naive, I do understand it's not that simple but it's really frustrating.

 

When I joined in 2006 is when I first leaned of slow food. Yet, if I remember correctly, the movement started in 1986 in Europe somewhere and if I'm not mistaken, things got some traction here back in 2001 thanks to Devotay.......but I could be wrong.

 

Anyhow, it was easy to understand because we were already practicing this ideal. Definitely not as a purist but I'd say 90% of what we ate at that time was fresh, home cooking. In fact, that's the way I was raised but with the use of some convenience items. Again those were things like Flour, oil, sugar, and some canned/frozen products that we didn't have the capability to produce on our own. Although we did have a garden and there's no chance of a salt mine suddenly appearing on our property or at the least I hope not in my lifetime......if you get my "drift".  Believe me though, I have on more than one occasion thought about purchasing some of the small appliances available to produce some items like flour or oil. The mill and press my Grandparents brought over from Italy were unusable/lost when I thought about this. Unfortunately, everything went away back in the 60's when they started cleaning out cellars. No one thought that anyone would want to use things like that again. Although I have to admit.........this depth of cooking has always intrigued me.

 

None the less, for us, it's trying to balance everything out so it works best. I wish we didn't have to fall back on some of the concepts we do but that's what available and for most of us.....has kept the lights and heat on. Until something better comes along or we discover it in the cities we visit, it is what it is. Thanks for the opportunity to share some thoughts.

post #65 of 72
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonPaul View Post
 


hear hear,soesje!!!it is also about resurrecting/preserving ancient varieties of fruit/veg & breeds of livestock etc.a "living/edible museum"which has to be good for our children both in terms of diet,broadening the education spectrum & the future of the planet.if i buy a bag of,say,kale,potatoes or a pack of lamb chops in tesco,it has the part of the uk it was grown/reared & the growers/farmers name stamped on the pack.so it's about choice & known provenance too.it is a double edged sword tho'.the older breeds/varieties very often give lower yields which combined with stock loss due to less use of pesticides/antibiotics etc results in higher prices,which can put the food beyond the reach of many.particularly in these difficult economic times.soooo,if the op is referring to the slow food movement(there appears to be some confusion)that would be a negative.i also find that i am becoming more "seasonal"in my food shopping.preferring to do without or find an "in season/locally grown" alternative ingredient,which,if everyone did on a large scale,would see a massive reduction in world trade,the consequences of which would be catastrophic for many countries.that could be negative #2.

but that's just me.

Thanks

post #66 of 72

One aspect of the slow food, local, grow your own that is causing me some consternation:

 

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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #67 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by koolsurrinam View Post
 

Thanks


my pleasure,kools!

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post #68 of 72
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dillbert View Post
 

>>I see what you mean,

 

did you see the (quite some time back) episode of Gordon Ramsay going totally bonkers stark raving crazy because...

 

a restaurant menu listed/advertised "Maine" lobster but the catch actually came from Canada.

I saw that episode, I think gordon was mad because restauranter was cheating his customers...

post #69 of 72

well, when you sell lobster as maine lobster and it comes from canada, that IS cheating so right he was….

post #70 of 72

I LOVE the idea behind slow food, being that it is focused on responsibly sourced and locally grown ingredients, and I love the name being a slap in the face to fast food, but some chefs take the name too literally. There used to be a wonderful restaurant near me which considered themselves a part of the slow food movement. The food was absolutely amazing, and it was a cosiest restaurant I've ever been in, but the food just took WAY TOO LONG every time. A good chef should be able to cook high quality, responsibly sourced food with enough speed to keep customers happy.

post #71 of 72
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by abaff410 View Post
 

I LOVE the idea behind slow food, being that it is focused on responsibly sourced and locally grown ingredients, and I love the name being a slap in the face to fast food, but some chefs take the name too literally. There used to be a wonderful restaurant near me which considered themselves a part of the slow food movement. The food was absolutely amazing, and it was a cosiest restaurant I've ever been in, but the food just took WAY TOO LONG every time. A good chef should be able to cook high quality, responsibly sourced food with enough speed to keep customers happy.

 

Yea, i agree slow food is great.....  food taste more delicious.... 

post #72 of 72

Ahh but I buy local pork bellies and I make my own bacon :D

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

One aspect of the slow food, local, grow your own that is causing me some consternation:

 

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