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Cooking Breakfast for a crowd

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I will be cooking breakfast for 20 at church tomorrow.

We will have scramble eggs, biscuits, sausage gravy, sausage and bacon.

I need help with the scrambled eggs. I know there are lots of ways.  I plan to cook on low, in non-stick skillet. Question is; what to use for moisture, cream, milk, water or nothing and how much whisking, a extreme amount or enough to incorporate. 

post #2 of 16

You don't need anything but the eggs for moisture. If you want, you can add a little cream, but it's not necessary to have moist scrambled eggs. Moisture is all about stopping the cooking at the right time. Adding the cream can help stopping the cooking process and avoid carryover cooking - unless you're going to use a water bath to keep them hot in which case they'll continue losing moisture as they wait. But if you make them progressively as people are getting served then you'll be fine. 

 

I wouldn't whisk at all. Just slowly turn the eggs as they are cooking and if/when you want to add cream, gently fold it with the eggs, just enough to incorporate. 

post #3 of 16

French Fries basically stated it all... 

 

If its removed from the pan and cooked correctly it will be great. 

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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post #4 of 16

in my (extended) circle - two ways to make scrambled eggs.

 

scrambled in the pan

scrambled out of the pan

 

in the pan - just crack the eggs in the pan, stir / break up the yolk as they set up, you get flecks of yellow and white.

 

out of the pan - the eggs are beaten in a bowl to a yellow soup, then poured in the pan.  taste of fresh may be much better, but the texture and appear is usually a match to powdered eggs.

 

personal preferences abound.

 

other than herbs and seasonings, I dislike the milk/cream/whatever additives.

 

grated cheese on top, that's good.  much better imho than mixed/cooked in the scrambled.

post #5 of 16

A tiny bit of water can help, other liquids can make them weep if they are held long.

post #6 of 16

If I were to add cream it would be purely for economic reasons, it makes a more bountiful scramble I guess.  At home I never add anything, I like plain old scramble.  To give it a little zing I would toss in a handful of finely chopped herbs, it makes it look pretty too.

 

Be sure to stop cooking the eggs while they're still glistening, they'll come up to temperature by the time you serve them.  If you cook them until done they'll be overdone by the time they reach the serving station.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #7 of 16
post #8 of 16

I've served  80 people from one batch of scrambled eggs with no problem.

Well for 20 people if they're all coming through the service line more or less at the same time, say 7am,

about 15 to 20 mins before service I would crack 18 to 24  eggs into a bowl, whip 'em up, add cream if

you want, (don't over whip, just mix well), then go ahead and cook them all at once in an 11 - 14 inch sauté

pan, just til fluffy. Then hold them in a pre-heated sterno -chaffer with a  lid on it. They'll hold fine for service,

Be sure to fluff em up now and then.

If you get low (say 2/3 gone) and still have more to feed, start another batch--only takes 8 mins or less to

cook a couple dozen scrambled, and those guests who are left will appreciate the freshness of theirs. .

Conversely, if service is spread out over a few hours, you'll have to do smaller batches, but I  still

see no reason you'd need to do scrambled on an individual basis.

post #9 of 16

If you want a bit more moisture use some tomatoes. In my family scrambled eggs are always made with diced and fried bacon and onions in a skillet, then the beaten eggs are added and then diced tomatoes (with the seeds and jelly removed if you don't want too much moisture), all garnished with chives. It is delicious.

post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thank you all for your help.  I will go into the kitchen tomorrow morning with a lot more confidants.  I guess I let the volume of more then a few eggs overpower me as I have not cooked breakfast for a group before.

post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks again, with your suggestions it was a nice breakfast.

post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by wlong View Post
 

Thanks again, with your suggestions it was a nice breakfast.

How so?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

How so?

Being my first time to do a breakfast for a group, I tried to listen to the posters to gain from their experience.

 

French Fries - Moisture is all about stopping the cooking at the right time.

 

KaiqueKuisine - If its removed from the pan and cooked correctly it will be great.

 

Mary B - A tiny bit of water can help, other liquids can make them weep if they are held long.

 

Koukouvagia - Be sure to stop cooking the eggs while they're still glistening.

 

From French Fries, Dillbert  and Meezenplaz I gained the methods of doing them.  Since I was doing 20 at a time, I mixed them out of pan.

 

I was quite pleased with the outcome, no scotched, tough or runny eggs, just nice and fluffy.

 

I didn't add any herbs or cheese but if I do it again that will happen.

 

I will try Ishbel's  and mhpr262 way at home, as each sounds good.

post #14 of 16

Glad to hear! Congrats on cooking a nice breakfast for 20! :)

post #15 of 16

Glad to hear it worked out.  I host a lot of dinner parties at my home but my favorite meal to host is definitely brunch.  It's my forte!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 

I don't think it would be off subject to tell us what you like to serve :lips: or even how you fix it too.

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