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I want to purchase a chef knife

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

If you're interested in helping someone new knife , please let me know your  knifes for purchase, to fill the slot of "main kitchen knife". I'm a busy home cook, but not a pro.
 

I have budget $150

post #2 of 10

You haven't specified any preferences, so I'll just leave this generic advice here. Get yourself a Hiromoto in stainless from JCK http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/Page4.html#GingamiNo.3  

 

Hiromoto gyuto in the 210-240mm length would fit your budget and should serve you well.

Worldwide shipping is 7$ and is pretty fast.  

post #3 of 10

check this out for some great guidelines given to me:

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/79536/2014-knife-summary

post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anton Kudris View Post

You haven't specified any preferences, so I'll just leave this generic advice here. Get yourself a Hiromoto in stainless from JCK http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/Page4.html#GingamiNo.3  

Hiromoto gyuto in the 210-240mm length would fit your budget and should serve you well.
Worldwide shipping is 7$ and is pretty fast.  
An excellent choice within your budget. Have the 240. Great steel, relatively easy sharpening for a stainless, a great no-nonsense performer. Would you be fine with a carbon (core) edge combined with a stainless cladding, have the AS series by the same maker. You can't go wrong with either of them.
post #5 of 10

Hiromoto knives are great.  Never tried the Gingami, only the Aogami, but I expect it would be excellent. Don't overlook the superb CarboNext knives from the same vendor.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
post #6 of 10
Phaedrus is absolutely right about the CarboNext, but I would advice them only to a somewhat experienced sharpener, as they happen to come OOTB with an unpredictable edge -- something between unsharpened and fairly usable, even with the Extra Sharpness option.
post #7 of 10
I can highly recommend the robert welch range of knives great for chefs and home cooks. Great value for money and extremely durable. All my chefs have used them since trying my set.
post #8 of 10
Here is a link to the Robert Welch Site http://www.robertwelch.com/Content.aspx?id=1108064
post #9 of 10
Thanks for this advertisement, we're dealing with:
Fully forged and robotically
engineered, the knives are
manufactured from German DIN
1.4116 stainless steel and hardened
to Rockwell 55-56.
Not exactly what people here are looking for, I guess.
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benuser View Post

Phaedrus is absolutely right about the CarboNext, but I would advice them only to a somewhat experienced sharpener, as they happen to come OOTB with an unpredictable edge -- something between unsharpened and fairly usable, even with the Extra Sharpness option.


Yeah, that's very true.  Most of the time when someone asks me what knife they should get I first ask "how do you plan to maintain it?"  If you're not comfortable sharpening then the CarboNext might not be your best choice.  On the other hand, any knife you buy will get dull eventually and require sharpening.  Japanese knives, as a rule, will get sharper and stay sharp longer.  But they generally have to treated more carefully and are somewhat harder to sharpen once they get dull.

 

I think the Tojiro DP line is a great deal.  Same steel and HT as a Shun but a bit cheaper.  Nowadays I'd rate the factory edge of a Tojiro as reliably very good, right up there with Shun.  No matter what knife I buy I always sharpen it before I use it unless by some weird chance it happens to have a great edge.  By and large Japanese knives come "semi sharpened", with the expectation that the end  user will apply the kind of edge they prefer.  But Western users expect the knife to be sharp and ready to go right out of the box.  In fact, for many folks the only time they'll ever experience a sharp knife is when that knife is new.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
Reply
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