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What would you create using "meat glue"?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

I've got some transglutaminase a.k.a meat glue sitting in the freezer that I am hoping to use soon. So far the only thing I've thought of doing is to create a seafood steak using lobster, scallops, and shrimp. I have zero experience using this stuff and from my research it can take some experimentation to figure out the right amount to use for different meat textures. Also I have the "RM" variant, there is also a "GS" variant and the two formulas are supposed to excel at different applications.

 

So if you were going to glue some meat together, what would you go for?

post #2 of 24

I've had squid steaks in this format and liked them quite well. 

 

I've seen this seafood sausage recipe by Caprial and also by David Waltuck. It  probably exists in some other places too. Not sure who originated it. Note this is done in plastic wrap and simmered, not a casing. These directions are as written by Caprial.

 

3/4 pound sea scallops, diced
1/2 pound halibut or other mild white fish, diced
3 shallots, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 cup heavy cream
4 large shrimp, diced
1/4 pound crab meat
1 teaspoon finely chopped chives
1/2 red bell pepper, seeded and cut into small dice
1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh thyme
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Flour, for dredging
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 

 

To prepare the seafood mousse: Place the bowl and blade of a food processor in the freezer to chill. In the chilled bowl of the food processor, combine the scallops, halibut, shallots, and garlic, and process until smooth. With the motor running, slowly add the cream through the feed tube and process until smooth. Transfer the mousse to a mixing bowl. Fold in the shrimp, crab, chives, red pepper, and thyme, and season with salt and pepper. Mix well.

To form the sausages: Transfer the mousse to a large pastry bag without a tip. Spread a 50-inch-long piece of plastic wrap out on the counter. Pipe the mousse into about a 48-inch-long strip down the middle of the plastic wrap, stopping at least 1 inch from each end. Fold one side of the plastic wrap over the mousse. Tightly roll up the mousse in the excess plastic wrap. With a piece of butcher's twine, securely tie one end of the roll. About every 5 inches, tie a knot with a piece of twine to form sausages, securing the end of the roll with a knot.

To cook: Bring about 8 cups of water to a boil in a large stock pot. Add the sausages and cook until firm, 6 to 8 minutes. Remove the sausages from the water and let cool for 10 minutes. (The sausages can be prepared up to this point and kept refrigerated for up to 2 days.)

Unwrap the sausages and dredge in the flour. Heat the olive oil in a large saute pan over high heat until very hot. Add the sausages and brown well, about 3 to 4 minutes. To serve, slice on the diagonal. Serve warm.

 

 

I've made it a few times and enjoyed it. No transglutaminase needed.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 

Ah right.. the mouse serves as a binder in that case. I'd consider that kind of a seafood terrine right? I was reading more on the use of TG and one concern is by gluing the outer surfaces together you greatly increase the amount of bacteria in the food. Do you have any thoughts on that Phatch? I know you have a pretty healthy respect of food borne illness.

post #4 of 24

I would want to cook it more than is sometimes popular with seafood currently where a little "rareness" is the trend. But that's fish, not shellfish which is often cooked a little more done anyway. Lobster tail, they recommend temps in the range of 140 to 145 internally for safety and texture appropriateness.  The squid steaks were probably about 1 cm thick, which is thick for squid at least.

 

I've not read anything addressing food safety for this. Best practice isto keep the food ice cold. Might even give it a low % bleach to water bath as they recommend for vegetables. 1 teaspoon bleach to a gallon of pure water. Then blot dry, put in a plastic bag in an ice water bath to keep it cold, but also dry in prep for the gluing.   

 

Seafood chemistry is tricky because the bio chemistry of the animal is set up to operate in near freezing temperatures, or at least refrigerator temperatures. Similarly for its pathogens and parasites. I would think (i have no references for this)  safe cooking temps would be lower as we see for cooking seafood anyway.  The government guidelines don't offer temps for shellfish really. 

 

http://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/charts/mintemp.html

 

Seafood Fin Fish 145 or cook until flesh is opaque and separates easily with a fork. None
Shrimp, lobster, and crabs Cook until flesh is pearly and opaque. None
Clams, oysters, and mussels Cook until shells open during cooking. None
Scallops Cook until flesh is milky white or opaque and firm.

N

 

 

Googling around, I think I would give my counters, equipment for this task and food gloves a bleach rinse as set out above. And yes, I'd wear gloves for this a surface contamination seems the bigger risk. Then move promptly on to the glue up. 

 

So my gut instinct would be to keep the thickness down  as compared to a beef steak so that you can hit a good internal temp without overcooking the outer layers. Maybe glue it up, a brutal sear for 30 seconds on each side, then, sous vide cook for doneneness? 

 

Might also be a good candidate for a butter poach, but I don't know how the TG would hold up to that technique. Maybe paint the exterior with a dark seasoning to give it a caramelized look like I did when I oil poached a pork tenderloin. http://www.cheftalk.com/t/76226/oil-poaching-chinese-style

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 24
Thread Starter 

Thanks Phatch, great input! It's funny a butter poach was exactly what I was thinking I would do. I was going to throw it on a hot grill afterwards for just 30 or 40 seconds on each side to give it a little char/added flavor. I'll keep in mind the precautions against further contamination when I go to try this.

post #6 of 24
Quote:

So my gut instinct would be to keep the thickness down  as compared to a beef steak so that you can hit a good internal temp without overcooking the outer layers. Maybe glue it up, a brutal sear for 30 seconds on each side, then, sous vide cook for doneneness? 

 

 

Not the other way round? I'd sous vide it to slightly below the desired core temp, and then sear it to finish. You lose the surface texture when you sous vide it after searing.

 

Another thing - I once had some chicken/shrimp mixture bound with transglutaminase. Definitely worth a try.

post #7 of 24

Hey, Phatch, Eastshores, glad to be #6.

 

Meat glue, love the stuff, uses?, chicken or turkey breast "bacon". Skin side down, rotate the next 180 hohizontally to fill the low again skin side down so's to get a fat layer in the middle, top the two with another layer of skin. I use a small pan to form a square and vac it to form. a "slab". I cut it like real thick bacon, cure and cook

 

 

Cheers,

 

EDG

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

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"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

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post #8 of 24
Around the holiday's we make what we call "Death by Bacon" or a "Bacon Roast" that consists of large pieces of , tasso, Canadian bacon, bacon ends, black forest ham etc., "glued" and wrapped in house made cherry and applewood bacon formed into a square pan and vacuum sealed to let set, then sliced and cooked like regular thick bacon, served on bread with tomato jam, on grits or with hash and of course for meat candy.

Out this afternoon to get chicken breasts for the chicken bacon process & pictures!

Phatch,
not to continue off topic but maybe a future one?, seafood sausage and variants. Vivid fond memory of one of my first very ambitious culinary adventures was natural cased seafood sausage over 30 years ago.
Fresh whole salmon, lobsters, yellow perch, shrimp, scallops, spinach, leeks, heavy cream, egg whites spices etc. Court bullion / stock from the fish bones and lobster & shrimp shells, sausage first gently poached in the bullion, blast chilled, then gently scored, sauced with the reduced bullion finished with heavy cream, Cognac and piquant pimentos then placed under a salamander
Since then various seafood quenelles, mousse('s, s, mice?) etc., that humbly have been very well received by guests, clients, friends and family & imho, think them some of the finest seafood dishes one can offer.

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

Reply

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

Reply
post #9 of 24

I've never done sous vide so I'm not up on the best order of doing things such as the sear step.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post
 

I've never done sous vide so I'm not up on the best order of doing things such as the sear step.

I only played around a bit with sous vide, but generally - if you sear it first, your crust gets steamed during the sous vide process and ends up soggy. Sous vide first then pan sear/put it under a salamander or sear it with a butane torch.

post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by EverydayGourmet View Post

Around the holiday's we make what we call "Death by Bacon" or a "Bacon Roast" that consists of large pieces of , tasso, Canadian bacon, bacon ends, black forest ham etc., "glued" and wrapped in house made cherry and applewood bacon formed into a square pan and vacuum sealed to let set, then sliced and cooked like regular thick bacon, served on bread with tomato jam, on grits or with hash and of course for meat candy.

Out this afternoon to get chicken breasts for the chicken bacon process & pictures!

Phatch,
not to continue off topic but maybe a future one?, seafood sausage and variants. Vivid fond memory of one of my first very ambitious culinary adventures was natural cased seafood sausage over 30 years ago.
Fresh whole salmon, lobsters, yellow perch, shrimp, scallops, spinach, leeks, heavy cream, egg whites spices etc. Court bullion / stock from the fish bones and lobster & shrimp shells, sausage first gently poached in the bullion, blast chilled, then gently scored, sauced with the reduced bullion finished with heavy cream, Cognac and piquant pimentos then placed under a salamander
Since then various seafood quenelles, mousse('s, s, mice?) etc., that humbly have been very well received by guests, clients, friends and family & imho, think them some of the finest seafood dishes one can offer.

That kind of seafood sausage works without transglutaminase, too, though - Just another emulgated sausage.

post #12 of 24

This was a course from valentines menu. We did a tasting menu based around sexy scenes from film. This was inspired by Cronenbergs The Fly, The Teleported Steak. The idea being the meat being "teleported" is broken down and reassembled, I used RM to combine tenderloin, striploin and prime ribinto a "supersteak." This turned out to be a logistical nightmare, but the results we well worth the effort.

Al
post #13 of 24

This was one of my first activa experiments, whole bone out chicken bug. I was having fun.
Al
post #14 of 24

Ha Ha nice Allan!

 

I had to do a bit of a double take on that one!  Chicken Bug!  Indeed!  I might have to do that one for the kids at halloween.

 

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One thing that I've used it for is for reshaping food that is 'un-even' ie. tapers and or has a non-standard shape.

Cooking these types of food is tricky as one part cooks faster than the rest etc.

 

Take two salmon filets from the same fish glue them head to tail - now you have an uniformly thick piece of salmon that will cook evenly.

 

Same can be done with chicken breasts, tenderloins and many other fish fillets.

 

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I've also done scallop logs in a similar style - glue end to end and then 'par-cook' them sous-vide at 50c for 30 minutes to set the proteins and firm up the flesh.

I then cooled them and sliced thinly for a quasi-raw appetizer canape. 

 

Alternatively you can sear the outside and serve warm, cutting them into perfect coins either before or after - it's very versatile.

 

The first cook in the sous-vide only firms up the texture and intensifies the flavour.   

 

A lot of this is derived from 'twice cooked scallops' in the book Ideas in Food p.25  by Aki Kamozawa and Alexander Talbot a great book for food adventurers.

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #15 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllanMcPherson View Post


This was one of my first activa experiments, whole bone out chicken bug. I was having fun.
Al

 

I have not laughed that hard in a long time. Chicken bug... that is hilarious! :lol:

post #16 of 24
Depending on the meat, I will often sear pre vac bagging, and again at the end. The first sear will soften in the water bath but it does intoduce some Maliard reaction flavour to the bad. The final sear gives a little more colour, and crust, if that is desired.

Al
post #17 of 24

This is a Lobster tail terrine I made using GS. Its accompanied with a fried oyster and tart apple slaw.
post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelGA View Post
 

One thing that I've used it for is for reshaping food that is 'un-even' ie. tapers and or has a non-standard shape.

Cooking these types of food is tricky as one part cooks faster than the rest etc.

 

Take two salmon filets from the same fish glue them head to tail - now you have an uniformly thick piece of salmon that will cook evenly.

 

Same can be done with chicken breasts, tenderloins and many other fish fillets.

 

There's a trick to skip the glue with salmon. I've seen Pepin take a filleted side of salmon. Cut it crossways about 2 inches wide. Cut again through the middle but not all the way through. Then fold the salmon so it takes on the shape of a "salmon steak", serve with the intact side up so it looks like one piece. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #19 of 24

That's pretty cool - hadn't seen that one before.

 

 

Here is another method that I've used for individual portions.

 

 

Sometimes though you just have to have that big 'whole' salmon for presentation or family style service.

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #20 of 24
Thanks for this thread everybody! I had totally forgotten about the chicken bug before this, but this has actually given me an idea for tomorrow's tiki menu! I will post pictures, assuming all goes well!
post #21 of 24


Here is a play on Rumaki,there is a bone out chicken thing, rolled around a liver farce, all attached to a chicken wing. Served on pickled water chestnuts, with a foie gras peanut sauce.
post #22 of 24
One thing I love to play with is the flavours of a Rueben sandwich. Yesterday I wanted to do a Rueben lasange but couldn't score any rye flour. Plan B was rissotto, and again I struck out on grouts. Rye bread was the only thing I could find. So I tore up a loaf, toasted it in butter and "milled" it in the vitamix. I really didn't feel like a soup dumpling or dough boy, so I tried something different.

I took the rye bread powder and combined it with whole eggs, some gelatin powder and Activia RM. I worked it like a dough, rolled like gnocchi, and rested. I boiled the pasta for about four minutes, drained and dried. These were crisped up in butter before saucing.

Really execellent result. The dumplings didn't bloat or absorb much water at all. They retained shape yet were fluffy inside.

Al


post #23 of 24
Thread Starter 

Alan! Thanks so much for continuing this topic. Your last post.. I think reminds me of a combination of gnocchi and brown bread in a can!

post #24 of 24
My pleasure, I am enjoying playing with this stuff, so its fun to share the "not ready for prime time" experiments. Colaboration and sharing is the best way forward. Here is a link to my business' FB page with some details on a recent project. Hope that's kosher.
https://www.facebook.com/alsatnight/posts/217143701815221
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