or Connect
ChefTalk.com › Groups › Creative Concepts and Techniques › Discussions › Do you moisten your rice at plating?

Do you moisten your rice at plating?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

A recent dish, I used my standard rice cooker/double boiler. I know that you want rice to have the texture of individual pieces but have you experimented with adding moisture? I was just thinking a couple shots of moisture would have helped the dish.. a lot. I'd guess a stock, or spice infused liquid?

post #2 of 11
Thread Starter 

Just to clarify, it's not as if I don't know how to cook rice. One of my favorite methods recently is to cook it like pasta.. huge amount of water and salt then to al-dente.. then strain. Still it can get dry.

post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastshores View Post
 

One of my favorite methods recently is to cook it like pasta.. huge amount of water and salt then to al-dente.. then strain.

Interesting. That's the method I was taught as a child, and grew up with. It took me years of experimentation to get away from that method, and get closer to pilaf or Asian methods (I generally use a rice cooker now). With the "grande eau" method (that's what we call it in France, where that method is ubiquitous), I almost always end up with a watery overcooked rice. 

 

I still don't consider myself a good rice cooker. In fact that's probably one area where I could really improve my basics. 

post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 

FF .. I have a "rice cooker" that is basically a double boiler. It's generally safe to do a 1 to 1 ratio of rice to water in this cooker. The steam makes it a little more forgiving I guess? Even when I consider my rice perfectly cooked, when plating I feel like I should add some moisture to the rice, especially if I don't have a sauce that is designed to add moisture.

post #5 of 11

That reminds me of what I do with couscous: first cook it so that the grains are airy and separate, then laddle some of the couscous broth over the couscous to moisten (and flavor) it. Never tried that with rice though. 

post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastshores View Post
 

Just to clarify, it's not as if I don't know how to cook rice. One of my favorite methods recently is to cook it like pasta.. huge amount of water and salt then to al-dente.. then strain. Still it can get dry.


I always use the absorption method when cooking rice, using the same ratios for any kind of rice, long grain or short grain. The ratio I use is 1 part rice and 1,5 part liquid plus salt. Then, it's only a matter of not stirring at all, mastering the heat and leave the rice covered all the time while cooking and resting. Comes out perfect, all the time.

 

My experience is that resting the rice in the cooking pot for at least 5 minutes, covered and absolutely no stirring, keeps the rice nicely moist. So, I never add any other moist after cooking. You could add flavored oils or vinaigrettes or other stuff, but I really think the delicate taste of "virgin" rice, perfectly cooked in slightly salted water is something really valuable to master and to appreciate.

post #7 of 11

Good morning. Sometimes i cook the rice al dente, (Asian method) and then make a mantecatura. I mean, add two, three dices of butter and mix like making pasta.

Add some parmesan, a fried egg on top and voilá, a quick and satisfying dish. It's said it was a favorite of Jorge Luis Borges, a man of humble culinary uses.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #8 of 11

I adopted the Alton Brown method and use it regularly with lots of success.

 

rice + water + salt (+ butter / seasons / etc)

bring to a boil

cover pot

put in hot oven 15 mins (more for larger batches)

remove from oven

let stand 15 mins

 

works perfect every time, dumb & simple, no pot watching, no burnt bottoms.

 

now . . . I weigh the rice, and I weigh the water.

I can adjust the moistness from very dry to near creamy, depending on end use

 

different rice types and different rice brands require different amounts of water and yes, it sure helps to keep notes.

post #9 of 11

If you like your rice moist use a Japanese style of rice, medium grain.

 

The ones grown in California are more than acceptable and arguably better than most Domestic Japanese grown (shh don't tell anyone I know that I said that)

 

Kokuho Rose is very easy to find in the USA and Canada and will change your thoughts about dry rice. 

Contrary to what the package says... wash the rice first. 

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #10 of 11

I prefer to cook my rice like a quick risotto.  Not with all the stirring, but I melt butter/oil, then add the rice to the pan and stir until coated with oil, seasonings if any, then I add the water and let it cook.  When I need sticky rice I stop off at my nearest sushi joint.

 

I don't know if this has any purpose to your original question, but it is extremely common in Greece to mix yogurt into rice, done right at serving.  My grandmother and mother for example consider rice and yogurt a complete meal.  I've not attempted to take this any further but there is something extremely satisfying about the texture of the warm rice and the cool yogurt coming together.  

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #11 of 11

My method is close to Chris's.

I mainly use basmati rice, but use the same proportions successfully with all types of rice:

1 rice, 1.5 water.

Heat till it boils, then stir once. Turn the stove down as low as it goes and cook for 10 minutes or so.

After that, just leave it standing, don't open the pot and don't stir (you could wrap the pot in a tea towel if you want to make sure it stays hot.

After about 15 minutes standing all water is absorbed and you can open the lid.

Fluff the rice with a fork or so and serve.

 

I used to use a rice cooker, but the rice didn't come out as good as with my old method, so I binned it.

 

If I want to reheat it I steam it.

 

Maybe try cooking your rice with whatever method works for you and throw it in a steamer for 10 minutes or so.It should come out very nicely that way

 

Another thing I do, is cook rice in advance and reheat by steaming (but more often than not, the left over rice gets turned into fried rice)

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

Reply
  Return Home
ChefTalk.com › Groups › Creative Concepts and Techniques › Discussions › Do you moisten your rice at plating?