or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › National Meatball Day
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

National Meatball Day

Poll Results: What type of meatballs do you usually make?

 
  • 18% (2)
    All beef
  • 72% (8)
    A mixture of different ground meats
  • 0% (0)
    Ground Lamb
  • 0% (0)
    I use ground Chicken or Turkey
  • 9% (1)
    Other
  • 0% (0)
    None of the above, I'm a vegetarian
11 Total Votes  
post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

Today is National Meatball Day in the USA.

Our household will be celebrating at our dinner table tonight.

 

Last week I 'put up' some marinara made of san marzano tomatoes

 

I have some marinara made of San Marzano tomatoes that

I 'put up' a few weeks ago at the ready.

 

 

And some MEATBALLS!

When I make these cuties, I use a pound each of ground chuck,

ground veal and hot Italian sausage that I get in bulk.

That makes alot of meatballs for just two people.

So I "IQF"  the uncooked balls on a sheet pan in the chest freezer

and then pop them into a zip-top bag.  This way I have them

ready to go at any time, like tonight!

I'll simply heat the marinara and toss in the defrosted

(but frozen is okay too) meatballs to gently

cook through on the back burner of the range,

boil up some pasta, reheat a loaf of Italian bread and then,

MANGIAMO!

 

How will you celebrate National Meatball Day?

post #2 of 29

Well, I promised the little one it's pizza night tonight.  

 

Guess I'll have to make a meat-ball pizza!

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #3 of 29

with other ingredients added it should turn out at least 24 2ounce or 48 cocktail size meatballs.

CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #4 of 29
Thread Starter 

@ED BUCHANAN that was pretty darn close... I wound up with just shy of three dozen.

That makes about four meatball dinners for the two of us.

post #5 of 29

We haven't had a meatball thread in a while, happy meatball day!  I didn't know it was so I didn't do anything but I got some fresh mint at the market yesterday so I think I'll go ahead and make a huge batch like you and freeze some.  How do you make yours?

 

1lb chuck

1lb pork

grated onion

garlic

breadcrumbs soaked in milk

fresh grated tomato

fresh parsley and mint

scallion

olive oil

red wine

salt/pepper

 

Dusted and fried, or baked in the oven.  

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 

Meatballs Our Way

1 lb. each Ground Beef and Veal

1 lb. bulk Hot (or mild) Italian Sausage

1 C. Breadcrumbs

2-4 Tbsp. Milk, just enough to moisten the breadcrumbs

2-4 cloves of Garlic, minced

¼ C. Parmesan Cheese, grated

2-4 Tbsp. fresh Flat Leaf or Italian Parsley, chopped

1 Egg, beaten

1 Tbsp. each, dried Oregano and Basil

Salt & Pepper to taste

In a large bowl, soak the breadcrumbs in the milk for a few minutes. Add remaining ingredients, mix well and portion out your meatballs, evenly.

Heat the marinara; add the frozen (no need to defrost), cover and simmer for about 20-30 minutes, until meat registers 165º

I opted for dried, boxed Rigatnoi, my husbands fav, rather than make pasta, I was just too busy yesterday.

 

@Koukouvagia I like the sounds of your recipe!

Our niece gave me The Meatball Shop Cookbook by Daniel Holzman & Michael Chernow for Christmas and I really want to try the Mediterranean Lamb Balls.

 

post #7 of 29

A week or two ago I was in a bit of a hurry, I ended up getting some pre formed meatballs at the meat counter of the local Kroger affiliate.  We were pleasantly surprised at how good they were, better than we were expecting.

 

But I probably should whip up a home made batch soon.

 

CREATOR: XV Version 3.10a Rev: 12/29/94 (PNG patch 1.2) Quality = 75, Smoothing = 0

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #8 of 29
Thread Starter 

Interesting

I'm curious as to how everyone cooks their meatballs.

I use to pan-fry mine in olive oil (messy)

then I went to baking them (too dry, maybe I cooked them too long?)

now I just chuck them into the sauce, frozen, to cook and flavor the marinara too ... this method,

I have found, produces a moist, not too hard, not too soft, but just right meatball

post #9 of 29

From my picture you can see I brown them in a skillet before tossing them into the sauce.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #10 of 29

It really depends on a few factors.

 

- how many am I doing?   Just a few for me and the wife?  Into the sauce!   Enough for extended family or guests probably the frying pan.   Enough for a fund raiser or party - sheet trays.

 

- the type of meatball is also a factor, if it has lots of aromatics and binder or is sweet then I use sheet trays as they stick and burn too easily in a frying pan.  Straight meat goes into the sauce as they will tend to fall apart if handled too much.

 

- presentation, If being served as an appetizer with a dipping sauce i'll take the time to use a frying pan as it colours better. 

 

- size, if really big then they get seared and then into a low oven to finish or a sauce.   vs. small ones made with a tiny 3/4 oz disher these will go into the oven on trays or a sauce... too much fiddling when in a pan.

 

I've recently found a great halal butcher in my area that makes amazing beef sausages from the trim around the ribs.   These have been making an appearance in a lot of my soups, just squeeze out from the casing into a pot of pho for simple quick meat addition, twenty minutes of gentle simmering before adding the veggies and serving makes for a great dish... and the little slick of fat on top is the real treat to drag your noodles through!

 

ps - as for dryness the final cooking temp is the biggest factor

- cooking in an oven at 350 is the easiest way to overcook them. 

- cooking them in a ~210 degree sauce is the easiest to keep juicy. 

- A frying pan works in the middle because the bottom bits start to burn before you have over cooked them so you usually stop in time.

 

Best to use a thermometer ~155 from a 350 degree oven is just fine, carry over will make all safe.   This will be in the 15-25 minute range, most people go way overboard 40 minutes plus!

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #11 of 29

I always pan fry first, then finish in the sauce. This gives me the best of both worlds. I prefer the taste of a meatball that's been first colored in hot oil (just like you would a hamburger) vs one that's been dunked raw in the sauce and is only poached. Maillard is your friend! :)

post #12 of 29

I cook my meatballs either by shallow frying or baking on a sheet tray on a convection oven.  I never put them inside any sauce, I prefer them dry and crisp on the outside.  More often than not we eat meatballs plain, no sauce, perhaps some tzatziki if it's on hand.  I made some yesterday, I'll post pictures soon.  I baked them in the oven and served them with blanched chickory that was lightly dressed with olive oil and lemon.  On rare occasion I will serve them with pasta in which case they meet the sauce right around the same time the noodles do for hubby.... they never meet sauce on my plate.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #13 of 29
I quite like making small meatballs with coarsely minced beef, onions, garlic, chili paste (normally sambal badjak), sweet soy (kecap manis), bread crumbs and egg.
And then I pan fry them.
Like koukou, I seldom cook them in a sauce, although I have eaten them with satay sauce a couple of times., but normally I prefer them as they are.

I have made a Thai green curry with meatballs one time which turned out very nice. I got to see if I got some pics somewher.

Oh and I like meatballs in my tomato soup!

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

Reply
post #14 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by butzy View Post


... I have made a Thai green curry with meatballs one time which turned out very nice. I got to see if I got some pics somewher.

Oh and I like meatballs in my tomato soup!

 

uhhh, in thai green curry sauce, @butzy , please share, that sounds like it would hit all of the taste buds at once with an explosion of tastiness!

... and in tomato soup (albeit we don't care for tomato soup) I would make for my mother ... 

post #15 of 29
I adore meatballs.  I could almost eat them every day ;-) The ingredients & cooking method depends on the dish.  Meatball  ingredients can range from Italian to Asian to Swedish to Greek.I make them from scratch - it takes 10 minutes, & do not freeze. Personally, I would not freeze meatballs & plunk them into a prepared sauce - thawed or frozen).
 
When I think of fresh frozen this comes to mind
 
post #16 of 29

Thanks Kaneo,

I basically got the idea from Dave Thompson's Street Food (green curry with roti) and adjusted it quite a bit.

 

Here is a boat load of little meatballs

 

Coconut milk is being infused with ground dried chili's, lemon grass, kaffir lime leaves and a bit of palm sugar

 

The meatballs are added to the mixture

 

And keep simmering away

 

At this point I actually ate them, and I have no more pictures

But if you keep simmering, eventually the coconut milk splits in an oily fraction which then fries the meatballs

Once they are fried, you remove a lot of the oil and put the meat balls aside

 

You now fry a couple of spoons of green curry paste in some of the oil and add more coconut milk and reduce again.

The meatballs are then added to the green curry and you end up with a very rich, but also very tasty dish :)

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

Reply
post #17 of 29

I made meatballs and finally getting around to posting them.  I used the food processor for the first time.  I usually chop everything by hand or grate the onion.  The FP actually pureed my onion!  And then I tried to sweat it in a little oil but it took a very long time and it turned out more like a paste.  Not doing that again.  I also found the FP chopped my herbs too finely so there was no texture inside the meatball, it was more like a little loaf.  I like the expedience of the FP but the results of hand grating/chopping much better.  I used 1lb beef, 1lb pork and 2 cups of breadcrumbs soaked in a little milk, 2 eggs.  Next time just 1 egg and a little milk, the mixture was a little too soft.

 

I wish I could find a way to cook them so they would remain round, instead they flatten on the bottom a little.  Not enough to make a big difference to the people I serve them to, just enough to irk me!

 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #18 of 29
I agree with you on the FP. And I also love to sweat shallots and barely fry a little garlic to add to the meatballs. Next time try not adding any egg: you don't need any and IMO the result is better without. As for the flattening, I have the same result, AFAIK that's the name of the game, unless someone has a solution? Maybe frying them in an Æbleskiver pan?

post #19 of 29
Thread Starter 

@French Fries that is a fantastic idea!

post #20 of 29

Well that sparked something ... wished I'd thought of this much much sooner.

 

I've had Takoyaki from street carts dozens of times but never thought about a home pan, should have known it exists.  Crazy Japanese!

 

Needs a gas stove. 20!

 

 

 

Needs an electrical outlet. $30 !!

Electric Japanese Takoyaki Pan Sop-650(r) Octopus Dumpling from JAPAN
 
Bigger!  for $40 !!!
Japanese TAKOYAKI YAKINIKU Grill pan maker cooking plate stove food recipe

 

Biggest!!!!   hraawww

Japanese TAKOYAKI Grill pan maker cooking plate Wide stove machine food recipe
 
 

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #21 of 29

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #22 of 29
Thread Starter 

I had to google search Takoyaki,

OOHHHHH!  

Love that stuff, I had no clue that this is how they are made...

post #23 of 29

I gave it a try tonight. I was in a hurry, and not really motivated to cook. Not the best day for meatballs (which are usually a bit time consuming for me). I decided to just wing it and go fast, and it worked great!! So here it goes: all I knew going in was, I wanted to make broccoli with oyster sauce, so I was going for an Asian theme. 

 

For the meatballs: 

- Ground pork 

- Shallots

- Garlic

- Panko crumbs

- Coconut cream

- Brown sugar

- Fish sauce

- Salt

- White pepper

- Shrimp Paste

- Lemon juice

- Lemon zest

 

1) Bit of coconut oil in each hole: 

 

 

2) I couldn't be bothered forming the meatballs beforehand, so I just quickly shaped them and placed one in each hole. What's great is that if you start from the pan's handle, go clockwise and finish with the center, then you keep doing the same order for flipping them and again taking them out of the pan, you know they all spent about the same amount of time in the pan. That trick is harder to pull with a regular flat bottom pan since the balls don't stay in one spot. 

 

 

3) Flipping time. I'm using my Æbleskiver flipping tool here to show off, but a regular chop stick will do the trick just fine:

 

   

 

4) This sight makes me happy (♫ clap along if you feel like a room without a roof ♫):

 

 

5) Plated dish (in the middle, a scallion flower):

 

post #24 of 29

Very nice!

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #25 of 29

Awesome stuff! 

 

Looks great.

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #26 of 29

Round meatballs have been reinvented!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #27 of 29

Thanks guys! :)

post #28 of 29
Thread Starter 

I love that scallion flower!

I've never seen one in flower, I suppose they just get harvested to fast?

Beautiful dish, especially for a quick, throw together, not inspired to cook, meal there @French Fries

post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post
 

I love that scallion flower!

I've never seen one in flower, I suppose they just get harvested to fast?

Beautiful dish, especially for a quick, throw together, not inspired to cook, meal there @French Fries

Thanks a lot K~girl, it was the first time I saw them in flower as well, at the farmer's market. Most flowers were still budding but that one was already open, and I thought it looked beautiful (it tastes great too). 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › National Meatball Day