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Are we crazy? - Page 2

post #31 of 53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emmbai90 View Post

...i think desserts are the most fun food to make, my favorite thing to make is chocolate muffins with choc chips and buffercream, i know that's considered sweet and savory but to me that's a dessert especially with melted chocolate inside.

 

No, there's nothing savoury about muffins.  People may think that muffins are healthy but they really are sugary treats.  Funny story, a couple of weeks ago I sent hubby to run out and get us some bagels for breakfast.  He brought back a chocolate chip muffin for our son.  I said "that's no kind of breakfast for a toddler!" and let him have a bit of my bagel with cream cheese.  The next day I was busy around the house and didn't have time to make him a proper breakfast so I gave him the muffin.  My son looked at the muffin and said "that's cake!"  I answered "no, that's a muffin."  He looked at me silently and took a bite..... then he said "that's cake."  

 

This is just one of the ways we stupid adults fool ourselves into believing we're eating an appropriate breakfast sometimes when really we're just eating cake.  

 

I wish you all would not call yourselves and others fatties and lardy-arses, it's so demeaning.  People who are overweight do bear responsibility for their health but they also do face a number of challenges and should not be put down based on their appearance.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #32 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel View Post

Yes, I understand that.. I see the lardy-arses on every street!

I just find sweeping statements hard to ignore. biggrin.gif


not quite sure which of my statements were "sweeping" but they are all supported by up to date statistics from the national health service,uk government stats,market intelligence from all of the major retailers & first hand,current,personal experience in the uk voluntary aid sector.so,to return to my original reply to koukou,far from crazy we are custodians of,if not a dying,then a rapidly contracting art in the uk & all of the statistical information proves it.

"Be Passionate,Love,Dream Big,Be Spontaneous,Celebrate,Change The World......Or Go Home"
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post #33 of 53
You misunderstood. It was not YOU who made sweeping generalisations...
post #34 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel View Post

You misunderstood. It was not YOU who made sweeping generalisations...

ahh,hah...in which case i apologise unreservedly,if my reply was found to be a tad "snappy",ishbel:peace:!!

"Be Passionate,Love,Dream Big,Be Spontaneous,Celebrate,Change The World......Or Go Home"
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post #35 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonPaul View Post


not quite sure which of my statements were "sweeping" but they are all supported by up to date statistics from the national health service,uk government stats,market intelligence from all of the major retailers & first hand,current,personal experience in the uk voluntary aid sector.so,to return to my original reply to koukou,far from crazy we are custodians of,if not a dying,then a rapidly contracting art in the uk & all of the statistical information proves it.
I agree about the art of cooking bu suppose that America hit rock bottom nutrition long ago and now there is an upsurge of fad healthy cooking and options. It's hip to buy local organic, everyone is low carb high protein whole grain eating amaranth and quinoa.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #36 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonPaul View Post

ahh,hah...in which case i apologise unreservedly,if my reply was found to be a tad "snappy",ishbel:peace: !!

Dinnae fash yersel'.

The Celtic Fringe should stick thegither wink.gif
post #37 of 53

This thread has gone far astray and the exchanges between members is descending in a negative direction at a rapid rate. Please exercise restraint and common decency in replies.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #38 of 53

Ditto to @cheflayne, straighten it out, discuss the ISSUES and leave personalities out or LOCKDOWN!

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Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
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post #39 of 53

So I am in complete agreement with Pete and Layne lets get back on topic. I did a clean up of posts that were not on target with the thread. 

 

For myself @Koukouvagia yes without wanting to hurt yours anyone else feelings for that matter.I truly feel that people have forgotten what the "soul" of a good meal is. Not it is all about hype and "have you been to so and sos new restaurant". Food was about coming together at the table and that was the point. If anything the table and the food provided a well prepared canvas for good times and memories. Not is has almost become like an obsession for so many people. For me I find at this point in my life I love a well cooked simple meal with good friends and a good bottle of wine. I love when someone takes the time to cook for me and want to give up some of the busy life to share a well roasted chicken with me. I find less and less that I want to snap a ton of photos of every dish (unless it is for a cheftalk how-to: :lips:).

 

So yes I think we have all (myself included) gotten a bit crazy about food. Not necessarily a bad thing.

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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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post #40 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel View Post


Dinnae fash yersel'.

The Celtic Fringe should stick thegither wink.gif

y cytunwyd arnynt(agreed!)the old enemy would be lost without our water,whiskey,gas,oil & fine produce;)!

"Be Passionate,Love,Dream Big,Be Spontaneous,Celebrate,Change The World......Or Go Home"
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"Be Passionate,Love,Dream Big,Be Spontaneous,Celebrate,Change The World......Or Go Home"
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post #41 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post


I agree about the art of cooking bu suppose that America hit rock bottom nutrition long ago and now there is an upsurge of fad healthy cooking and options. It's hip to buy local organic, everyone is low carb high protein whole grain eating amaranth and quinoa.


......and beans i trust!!the problem for a lot of people on low incomes over here,is that they know that fresh is better but they just can't afford the gas/electric to cook it.hence,they are driven into the arms of the fast food/microwave meal brigade.i'm hoping that now that the good times are returning,these folks will return to the fold.

"Be Passionate,Love,Dream Big,Be Spontaneous,Celebrate,Change The World......Or Go Home"
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post #42 of 53

My friends know I love food. Some do enjoy seeing the food pics. I don't think it's crazy. People post what they love. I happen to love food and animals (even the ones not for eating), so my posts usually are about those topics. I don't see it as being different than people who posts about sports or family or whatever they're into. All I can say is be proud of what you love and don't let others bring you down.

post #43 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonPaul View Post
 


......and beans i trust!!the problem for a lot of people on low incomes over here,is that they know that fresh is better but they just can't afford the gas/electric to cook it.hence,they are driven into the arms of the fast food/microwave meal brigade.i'm hoping that now that the good times are returning,these folks will return to the fold.

 

Beans, maybe.  A lot of people I know are doing paleo diets and don't eat legumes.  It is believed that legumes cause leaky gut syndrome.  

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #44 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicko View Post
 

So I am in complete agreement with Pete and Layne lets get back on topic. I did a clean up of posts that were not on target with the thread. 

 

For myself @Koukouvagia yes without wanting to hurt yours anyone else feelings for that matter.I truly feel that people have forgotten what the "soul" of a good meal is. Not it is all about hype and "have you been to so and sos new restaurant". Food was about coming together at the table and that was the point. If anything the table and the food provided a well prepared canvas for good times and memories. Not is has almost become like an obsession for so many people. For me I find at this point in my life I love a well cooked simple meal with good friends and a good bottle of wine. I love when someone takes the time to cook for me and want to give up some of the busy life to share a well roasted chicken with me. I find less and less that I want to snap a ton of photos of every dish (unless it is for a cheftalk how-to: :lips:).

 

So yes I think we have all (myself included) gotten a bit crazy about food. Not necessarily a bad thing.

 

How we eat dinner is as indicative as what we eat.  Take going out for dinner for instance.  It is commonly accepted that when we sit down at a restaurant we must conscious that we leave in a timely fashion because the restaurant needs to turn over our table, the waitress wants another table to wait on and so there is a sense of urgency while eating, conscious or subconscious but it's there.  This is aided by the fact that we live in busy times, people don't necessarily enjoy lingering over their food or stretching out the courses.  In Greece when we go out to dinner for example there is no thought given to turn over.  A restaurant assumes that once a table is occupied it's the last they'll see of that table lol.  People linger over their meals. There might be an hour or more time lapsed between the end of appetizers before anyone thinks of ordering entrees.  And this is acceptable.  You can't do that here, the manager will come over and ask you to leave.  

 

Sometimes I sense that being involved with food leads others to believe we are simple or gluttonous.   

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #45 of 53

I can not say that I'm obsessed with food (I just like to cook), but I am sympathetic to such people. I like the fact that these people have in life something what gives them pleasure. Why not?  :)  

post #46 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

 

How we eat dinner is as indicative as what we eat.  Take going out for dinner for instance.  It is commonly accepted that when we sit down at a restaurant we must conscious that we leave in a timely fashion because the restaurant needs to turn over our table, the waitress wants another table to wait on and so there is a sense of urgency while eating, conscious or subconscious but it's there.

 

When Karen and I went to Forage here in Salt Lake, it was obvious that such was NOT the case.  On their web page they even suggest allowing at least 2.5 hours to appreciate the experience.  We did a 12 course tasting, took us about 3 hours.  What a wonderful experience.  If we ever go again, I'm going to opt for the wine pairing, let the chef decide, rather than just a few on my own.

 

mjb.

 

http://www.foragerestaurant.com/reservations.php

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #47 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

Take going out for dinner for instance.  It is commonly accepted that when we sit down at a restaurant we must conscious that we leave in a timely fashion because the restaurant needs to turn over our table, the waitress wants another table to wait on and so there is a sense of urgency while eating, conscious or subconscious but it's there.  This is aided by the fact that we live in busy times, people don't necessarily enjoy lingering over their food or stretching out the courses.  In Greece when we go out to dinner for example there is no thought given to turn over.  A restaurant assumes that once a table is occupied it's the last they'll see of that table lol.  People linger over their meals. There might be an hour or more time lapsed between the end of appetizers before anyone thinks of ordering entrees.  And this is acceptable.  You can't do that here, the manager will come over and ask you to leave.  

Go to a restaurant in France and your experience will be closer to the Greek experience! 

- They rarely take reservations (or serve dinner) before 7pm, sometimes 7:30pm. 

- They expect you to stay the whole night, and they don't normally reuse the same table for another party. 

- In many situations, the restaurant is your party's plan for the night. If you sit down at 7:30pm, you may be done at 9pm if you're very, very fast (for example if you intend to catch a movie at the theater), but nobody will be surprised if your party is still sitting down at the table at 1am. 

- While the law says restaurants have to close at 1am, no self-respecting restaurant owner will tell their customers it's time to go home. They'll close the doors and curtains on the street side, and the patrons can stay as long as they want. The restaurant owners may frown, but I've seen parties stay until 3 or 3:30am before. 

post #48 of 53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

 

When Karen and I went to Forage here in Salt Lake, it was obvious that such was NOT the case.  On their web page they even suggest allowing at least 2.5 hours to appreciate the experience.  We did a 12 course tasting, took us about 3 hours.  What a wonderful experience.  If we ever go again, I'm going to opt for the wine pairing, let the chef decide, rather than just a few on my own.

 

mjb.

 

http://www.foragerestaurant.com/reservations.php

 

This is clearly the exception, obviously they want their customers to enjoy an evening of dining with friends and say so.  I wish it were more common!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #49 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

Go to a restaurant in France and your experience will be closer to the Greek experience! 

- They rarely take reservations (or serve dinner) before 7pm, sometimes 7:30pm. 

- They expect you to stay the whole night, and they don't normally reuse the same table for another party. 

- In many situations, the restaurant is your party's plan for the night. If you sit down at 7:30pm, you may be done at 9pm if you're very, very fast (for example if you intend to catch a movie at the theater), but nobody will be surprised if your party is still sitting down at the table at 1am. 

- While the law says restaurants have to close at 1am, no self-respecting restaurant owner will tell their customers it's time to go home. They'll close the doors and curtains on the street side, and the patrons can stay as long as they want. The restaurant owners may frown, but I've seen parties stay until 3 or 3:30am before. 

 

I suspect this is true throughout much of Europe.  It goes along with the opposing philosophies between Americans and Europeans.

 

Europe = "Work to live"

America = "Live to work"

 

Also, greeks wouldn't be caught dead with a to-go cup of coffee.  Coffee is a sit-down experience to be enjoyed alone or shared by friends, not a beverage.  Starbucks has not done very well in Greece.  Imagine now, living in nyc it's a go go go go go type of pace all the time, eating breakfast standing at their kitchen counter or gobbling up a protein bar on the subway, eating lunch at their desks, sipping coffee throughout the day.  Then they get to their dinner and again they have to rush through it.  

 

That actually reminds me, one of the techniques I employed while trying to lose weight was mindful eating.  It's been an eye opening experience to sit down and properly savor food, bite by bite, giving thought to how it's made and how it tastes.  Mindfulness is a lost skill here in the usa.  

 

I think we're coming to the conclusion that we are indeed not crazy for enjoying the bounty of life, for taking the time to nurture ourselves and our families and enjoy the time that we spend together doing so.  

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #50 of 53

Food feeds the body.  Cooking feeds the soul.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #51 of 53
Thread Starter 
That's beautiful teamfat. It should be in your signature.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #52 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

That's beautiful teamfat. It should be in your signature.

 

Thanks.  Actually I probably should add a signature.  Maybe I can remember how to do it!

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #53 of 53

I like the saying.. but IMO food also feeds the soul. There are many food lovers who can't boil water. 

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